Society for Creative Anachronism
College of Arms

427 W Ave
Spokane, WA 99203
+1 509 570 4189
laurel@heraldry.sca.org

For the February 2020 meetings, printed April 14, 2020

To all the College of Arms and all others who may read this missive, from Juliana Laurel, Alys Pelican, and Cormac Wreath, greetings.

* From Laurel: Virtual KWHSS 2020

As you've doubtless already heard, Known World Heraldic and Scribal Symposium for 2020 has been cancelled as a face to face event due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. We were so looking forward to meeting in Lochac -- but we'll have to settle for seeing each other virtually instead. The details of a virtual event, included classes, meetings, and the traditional roadshow, will be announced shortly -- keep your eyes on https://kwhss.lochac.sca.org/ for details and we'll pass them along as we get them.

We want to thank the event team for their hard work in organizing this international event and translating between Lochac and the Laurel office. It's been a learning experience for me as I've learned a lot of interkingdom anthropology but also made new friends. We're looking forward to the virtual event and all that will go with it.

Given the many limitations on the ability of hotels to respond to our request for proposals and our ability to visit them, we're extending the deadline for 2021 KWHSS bids to September 1. We know it will make planning harder, but we see little alternative when events are not happening and many people working from home. Please feel free to reach out for assistance or to ask questions.

* From Wreath: Migrant -- This Bird Has Flown

This month, we were asked to consider a submission with an eagle in a migrant posture. The posture of migrant for birds carries a step from period practice because there is no documentation for it in period as a heraldic posture. It is very similar to the well-documented posture displayed, except that the feet are tucked out of sight, the head faces to chief rather than to dexter or sinister, and the viewer sees back of the bird rather than the breast. Each of these changes hinder identification of the type of bird from the viewer, as most identifying features (shape of the beak and any cresting on the head, size and shape of the feet and length of the legs, and conspicuous breast plumage) are all obscured.

Over the last few years, we have considered discontinuing individual postures and orientations that carry a step from period practice due to lack of documentation, including winged quadrupeds displayed and wolves' heads ululant. In these cases, the motivating factor was that use of the posture was causing issues of identification for the charge or its orientation, whether it was the forelimbs of the dragon frequently overlapping the wings and the belly being depicted in trian posture, or ululant wolf's heads blurring the distinction between fesswise, bendwise, and palewise. Migrant runs into a similar issue.

Therefore, given that the differences between migrant and any other bird posture with displayed wings only serve to obscure the identity of the charge, use of the migrant posture will be discontinued. Items with migrant postures appearing on external Letters of Intent published after June 30, 2020 will either be pended and redrawn in a period posture that approximates the original art or returned for further work.

* From Palimpsest: Administrative Handbook Form Letters Update

We recently updated Appendix D of the Administrative Handbook to incorporate guidance from the January, May, and December 2019 Cover Letters. The new Appendix D incorporates cross-references between similar types of letters. We have also made the pronoun options consistent: "[his / her / their]" appears in all Appendix D form letters where such a choice is relevant.

* From Pelican: Lingua Societatis Summary

We propose the adoption of the following new sections of SENA, replacing the existing NPN1A1, NPN1B (Designators), NPN1C2c (Lingua Anglica Allowance), NPN1C2f (Branch Name Allowance), and Appendix E:

NPN1A1

Proposed Text

Lingua Societatis, as used in the following rules, allows the translation of certain elements of a name into a modern language. The modern languages that may be used under lingua Societatis vary depending on the location of the submitter. Standard modern English is always an option for lingua Societatis translations.

Individual submitters may also use lingua Societatis translations in the modern language of their country of residence, as determined by the address listed on the submission form. The language of the submitter's country of residence is not limited to language(s) designated by that country as an "official" language. Multiple factors may be considered to determine whether a particular language is the "language of the submitter's country of residence," including but not limited to the language(s) used by the local SCA groups to hold business meetings, the language(s) spoken by the local SCA groups in court or at events, the language(s) in which reports, newspapers and media are published within the local area, and the percentage of the population that speaks the particular language.

If the submitter is a branch, in addition to standard modern English, it may use lingua Societatis translations in the modern language of a country or countries within that branch's territory. The branch's modern language is not limited to language(s) designated as "official" national languages. As in the case of individuals, multiple factors may be considered to determine whether a particular language qualifies for use under lingua Societatis, including but not limited to the language(s) used by the branch to hold business meetings, the language(s) spoken by members of the branch in court or at events, the language(s) in which reports, newspapers and media are published within the local area, the percentage of the branch's members that speaks the particular language, and the percentage of the general population within the branch's territory speaking that language.

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NPN1B

Current Text

B. Designators: The designators which may be used are determined by the type of non-personal name submission. In general, if the lingua Anglica form of a designator is used, the prepositions and articles which join the designator to the substantive element will also take the lingua Anglica form. Lingua Anglica allows English translations of certain elements; it is discussed in greater detail in C.2.c below.

Proposed Text

B. Designators: The designators which may be used are determined by the type of non-personal name submission. In general, if the lingua Societatis form of a designator is used, any prepositions and articles which join the designator to the substantive element must be in the language of the designator. Lingua Societatis is discussed in greater detail in A.1 above and in C.2.c below.

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B. Designators: The designators which may be used are determined by the type of non-personal name submission. In general, if the lingua AnglicaSocietatis form of a designator is used, the any prepositions and articles which join the designator to the substantive element will also take the lingua Anglica formmust be in the language of the designator. Lingua AnglicaSocietatis allows English translations of certain elements; it is discussed in greater detail in A.1 above and in C.2.c below.

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NPN1B1

Current Text

1. Branch Designators: The designators for branches (local SCA groups) are fixed by the Governing Documents. The list may be found in Appendix E of this document. These designators are considered to be compatible with any place name construction. This is true whether or not period forms can be found with such a designator. Shires are not limited to the forms of English shires, nor baronies to the kinds of names found for baronies in period. In addition, each type of branch may be registered with other designators suitable for that branch type. A college may be named following the pattern of medieval colleges. These designators may take the lingua Anglica form, using the form Designator of X regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternately, a translation for the appropriate type of branch may be proposed. A list of translations that have been registered can be found in Appendix E.

In general, changes of status for a branch, such as changing from shire to barony, do not need to be submitted. The Laurel office does not track those changes in status (that being a duty of the Seneschal and Board of Directors). However, it will acknowledge them when a new submission is made. The exception is when a branch wants the approval of a new alternate form of the branch designator, such as a non-English form. Such approval requires Laurel approval, but is an administrative action (which does not require fees) and does not delay the change in status.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we only allow non-personal names from locations beyond Europe when the entity in question could have traveled to Europe. As branches could not have so traveled, designators for branch names may only be in languages used in medieval and Renaissance Europe.

Proposed Text

1. Branch Designators: The standard English designators for branches (local SCA groups) are established by the Governing Documents. The list may be found in Appendix E of this document. These designators are considered to be compatible with any place name construction. This is true whether or not period forms can be found with such a designator. Shires are not limited to the forms of English shires, nor baronies to the kinds of names found for baronies in period. In addition, each type of branch may be registered with other designators suitable for that branch type. In particular, a college may be named following the pattern of medieval colleges.

The standard English designators may be used in the lingua Societatis form Designator of X regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation of a standard English designator may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Translations of the designator for the appropriate branch type into a medieval language may also be used; however, in this case, the documented form of the designator should be consistent in language with the substantive phrase. A list of the standard English designators and some previously registered translations can be found in Appendix E.

In general, changes of status for a branch, such as changing from shire to barony, do not need to be submitted. The Laurel office does not track those changes in status (that being a duty of the Seneschal and Board of Directors). However, it will acknowledge them when a new submission is made. The exception is when a branch wants the approval of a new alternate form of the branch designator, such as a newly documented medieval spelling of the designator. Such approval requires Laurel approval, but is an administrative action (which does not require fees) and does not delay the change in status.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we only allow non-personal names from locations beyond Europe when the entity in question could have traveled to Europe. As branches could not have so traveled, designators for branch names may only be in languages used in medieval and Renaissance Europe or in modern, lingua Societatis forms.

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1. Branch Designators: The standard English designators for branches (local SCA groups) are fixed established by the Governing Documents. The list may be found in Appendix E of this document. These designators are considered to be compatible with any place name construction. This is true whether or not period forms can be found with such a designator. Shires are not limited to the forms of English shires, nor baronies to the kinds of names found for baronies in period. In addition, each type of branch may be registered with other designators suitable for that branch type. A In particular, a college may be named following the pattern of medieval colleges. These designators may take colleges.

The standard English designators may be used in the lingua AnglicaSocietatis form, using the form Designator of X regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternately, a Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation for the of a standard English designator may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Translations of the designator for the appropriate branch type of branch may be proposed. into a medieval language may also be used; however, in this case, the documented form of the designator should be consistent in language with the substantive phrase. A list of the standard English designators and some previously registered translations that have been registered can be found in Appendix E.

In general, changes of status for a branch, such as changing from shire to barony, do not need to be submitted. The Laurel office does not track those changes in status (that being a duty of the Seneschal and Board of Directors). However, it will acknowledge them when a new submission is made. The exception is when a branch wants the approval of a new alternate form of the branch designator, such as a non-English form. newly documented medieval spelling of the designator. Such approval requires Laurel approval, but is an administrative action (which does not require fees) and does not delay the change in status.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we only allow non-personal names from locations beyond Europe when the entity in question could have traveled to Europe. As branches could not have so traveled, designators for branch names may only be in languages used in medieval and Renaissance Europe or in modern, lingua Societatis forms.

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NPN1B2

Current Text

2. Order and Award Designators: The designators for order names must follow a documented pattern for medieval order names. The standard designators are Order and Award. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take the lingua Anglica form, using the forms above regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternately, they may take the language of the substantive element. A list of some translations of these designators is listed in Appendix E. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Order of the Levrier or Ordre du Levrier is registerable for the meaning 'order of the hound', but Order du Levrier and Ordre of the Levrier are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Order of the Levrier is registerable as an order name, but not as a household name. On the other hand, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name.

Proposed Text

2. Order and Award Designators: The designators for order names must follow a documented pattern for medieval order names. The standard English designators are Order and Award. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may be used as a lingua Societatis form, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation of Order or Award may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternatively, designators may take the language of the substantive element. A list of some translations of these designators is listed in Appendix E. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Order of the Levrier or Ordre du Levrier is registerable for the meaning 'order of the hound', but Order du Levrier and Ordre of the Levrier are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Order of the Levrier is registerable as an order name, but not as a household name. On the other hand, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name.

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2. Order and Award Designators: The designators for order names must follow a documented pattern for medieval order names. The standard English designators are Order and Award. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take the be used as a lingua AnglicaSocietatis form, using the forms above standard English forms, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation of Order or Award may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Alternately, they Alternatively, designators may take the language of the substantive element. A list of some translations of these designators is listed in Appendix E. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Order of the Levrier or Ordre du Levrier is registerable for the meaning 'order of the hound', but Order du Levrier and Ordre of the Levrier are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Order of the Levrier is registerable as an order name, but not as a household name. On the other hand, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name.

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NPN1B3

Current Text

3. Household and Association Names: The designators for household names must be documented as a form describing a group of people in a particular culture. It must be compatible with the substantive element in terms of content and style. There is no standard designator which is considered compatible with all types of names for groups of people.

Several kinds of groups of people have served as models for household names. They include a noble household, a military unit, a guild, a group of people associated with an inn or tenement house, a university or school (noting that the word college is reserved for branches), clans, and an organized group of musicians or actors. Designators may be registered in the original language or may take the lingua Anglica form. Suitable substantive elements (like simple descriptions) may take the lingua Anglica form as well. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Compagnia di Santa Lucia or Company of Santa Lucia is registerable for the meaning 'company of Saint Lucia', but Company di Santa Lucia and Compagnia of Santa Lucia are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name. On the other hand, Order of San Philippe is registerable as an award or order name, but not a household name.

Proposed Text

3. Household and Association Names: The designators for household names must be documented as a form describing a group of people in a particular culture. It must be compatible with the substantive element in terms of content and style. There is no standard designator which is considered compatible with all types of names for groups of people.

Several kinds of groups of people have served as models for household names. They include a noble household, a military unit, a guild, a group of people associated with an inn or tenement house, a university or school (noting that the word college is reserved for branches), clans, and an organized group of musicians or actors. Designators may be registered in the original language or may take the lingua Societatis form. Suitable substantive elements (such as simple descriptions) may take the lingua Societatis form as well. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Compagnia di Santa Lucia or Company of Santa Lucia is registerable for the meaning 'company of Saint Lucia', but Company di Santa Lucia and Compagnia of Santa Lucia are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name. On the other hand, Order of San Philippe is registerable as an award or order name, but not a household name.

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3. Household and Association Names: The designators for household names must be documented as a form describing a group of people in a particular culture. It must be compatible with the substantive element in terms of content and style. There is no standard designator which is considered compatible with all types of names for groups of people.

Several kinds of groups of people have served as models for household names. They include a noble household, a military unit, a guild, a group of people associated with an inn or tenement house, a university or school (noting that the word college is reserved for branches), clans, and an organized group of musicians or actors. Designators may be registered in the original language or may take the lingua AnglicaSocietatis form. Suitable substantive elements (such as simple descriptions) may take the lingua AnglicaSocietatis form as well. Documenting a designator for an order name does not show it is appropriate for household names, and documenting a designator for household names does not show it is appropriate for orders.

For example, either Compagnia di Santa Lucia or Company of Santa Lucia is registerable for the meaning 'company of Saint Lucia', but Company di Santa Lucia and Compagnia of Santa Lucia are not; in each one, the preposition and article do not match the language of the designator.

For example, Galeón San Pedro y San Philippe is registerable as a household name (for a group of sailors), but not as an order name. On the other hand, Order of San Philippe is registerable as an award or order name, but not a household name.

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NPN1B4

Current Text

4. Heraldic Titles: The designators for heraldic titles must follow a documented pattern for heraldic titles. The standard terms for heraldic titles for kingdoms and local branches are Herald and Pursuivant. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take the lingua Anglica form, using the forms above regardless of the language of the substantive phrase, or they may take the language of the substantive element. The designator Principal Herald is restricted to the chief herald of a kingdom. The designator King/Queen/Sovereign of Arms is restricted to the Laurel office. In general, changes of designator, for example from pursuivant to herald, do not need to be submitted to the Laurel office; if submitted, they are administrative actions, which do not require fees.

For example, a heraldic title based on the German placename Funffprun could be Funffprun Herold or Funffprun Herald, as Herold is found as a German term for heralds, but it could not be Funffprun Herault, as Herault is a French term for heralds.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles. This applies to both the designator and the substantive elements of such heraldic titles.

Proposed Text

4. Heraldic Titles: The designators for heraldic titles must follow a documented pattern for heraldic titles. In English, the standard lingua Societatis terms for heraldic titles for kingdoms and local branches are Herald and Pursuivant. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take a lingua Societatis form, or they may take the language of the substantive element. The designator Principal Herald and its translations are restricted to the chief herald of a kingdom. The designator King/Queen/Sovereign of Arms and its translations are restricted to the Laurel office. In general, changes of designator, for example from Pursuivant to Herald, do not need to be submitted to the Laurel office; if submitted, they are administrative actions, which do not require fees.

For example, the Kingdom of the West could register a heraldic title based on the German placename Funffprun either in the entirely German form Funffprun Herold or in the lingua Societatis form Funffprun Herald. However, the West could not register Funffprun Herault, as Herault is a French term for heralds. On the other hand, because French is one of the national languages of Canada, the Kingdom of Ealdormere could register Funffprun Herault with a French designator by using Lingua Societatis.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles. This applies to both the designator and the substantive elements of such heraldic titles.

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4. Heraldic Titles: The designators for heraldic titles must follow a documented pattern for heraldic titles. The In English, the standard lingua Societatis terms for heraldic titles for kingdoms and local branches are Herald and Pursuivant. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take the a lingua AnglicaSocietatis form, using the forms above regardless of the language of the substantive phrase, or they may take the language of the substantive element. The designator Principal Herald is and its translations are restricted to the chief herald of a kingdom. The designator King/Queen/Sovereign of Arms is and its translations are restricted to the Laurel office. In general, changes of designator, for example from pursuivant to herald, Pursuivant to Herald, do not need to be submitted to the Laurel office; if submitted, they are administrative actions, which do not require fees.

For example, the Kingdom of the West could register a heraldic title based on the German placename Funffprun could be either in the entirely German form Funffprun Herold or in the lingua Societatis form Funffprun Herald. However, the West could not register Funffprun Herault, as HeroldHerault is found as a German a French term for heralds, but it heralds. On the other hand, because French is one of the national languages of Canada, the Kingdom of Ealdormere could not be register Funffprun Herault, as Herault is with a French term for heralds.designator by using Lingua Societatis.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles. This applies to both the designator and the substantive elements of such heraldic titles.

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NPN1C2c

Current Text

c. Lingua Anglica Allowance: We also allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed household names, heraldic titles, and order names into standard modern English, which we call the lingua Anglica rule. We allow this because the meanings of these names would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation must be a literal, plausible and complete translation. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

For example, Blanche Sanglier Pursuivant can be translated as White Boar Pursuivant, but not White Sanglier Pursuivant, Snowy Boar Pursuivant, or White Piggy Pursuivant.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua Anglica form is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning.

Proposed Text

c. Lingua Societatis Allowance: We also allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed household names, heraldic titles, and order names into standard modern languages appropriate to the submitting individual or branch, as described in NPN.1.A. We allow this because the meanings of these names would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation must be a literal, plausible and complete translation. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule.

For example, Blanche Sanglier Herald can be translated into standard modern English as White Boar Herald, but not White Sanglier Herald, Snowy Boar Herald, or White Piggy Herald. A barony located in the Netherlands could register the modern Dutch form Witte Everzwijn Heraut, using the lingua Societatis rules for Dutch.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua Societatis form in English is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning.

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c. Lingua AnglicaSocietatis Allowance: We also allow the registration of translations of attested and constructed household names, heraldic titles, and order names into standard modern English, which we call the lingua Anglica rule. languages appropriate to the submitting individual or branch, as described in NPN.1.A. We allow this because the meanings of these names would have been clear to the speakers of these languages, but may be unclear to modern speakers. The translation must be a literal, plausible and complete translation. Under no circumstances will translations of the meanings of given names or placenames be registerable under this rule. rule.

For example, Blanche Sanglier PursuivantHerald can be translated into standard modern English as White Boar PursuivantHerald, but not White Sanglier PursuivantHerald, Snowy Boar PursuivantHerald, or White Piggy PursuivantHerald. A barony located in the Netherlands could register the modern Dutch form Witte Everzwijn Heraut, using the lingua Societatis rules for Dutch.

For example, the Spanish byname de Castilla may be translated as of Castile. The Arabic byname al-Dimashqi may be translated as of Damascus or the Damascene. However, while Cairo is derived from a word which means "the victorious", its lingua AnglicaSocietatis form in English is of Cairo, not of The Victorious, as "The Victorious" is a translation of the meaning.

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NPN1C2f

Current Text

f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. Only the exact registered form of the branch name may be used, in the lingua Anglica form "of Branchname". Translated forms will not be registered under this allowance.

For example, we would allow the forms of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected lingua Anglica forms. However, this would not allow von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the rest of the submission was in German. Similarly, it would not allow de la Fontaine dans Sable as a fully French version of "of Fontaine dans Sable", even though the branch name is French. That is, we would allow Ordre du Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable or Order of the Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable, but we would not allow Ordre du Levrier de la Fontaine dans Sable under this rule, as this is not the lingua Anglica form of the branch name, even though it matches the intended origin of the submission. If Fontaine dans Sable can also documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French order name; however that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance. For example, we would not allow of the Midrealm, as this is not the registered form of the Kingdom of the Middle.

Proposed Text

f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. The name phrase must use a lingua Societatis form meaning 'of Branchname' or 'from Branchname'. In English, the usual lingua Societatis form incorporating an SCA branch name is 'of Branchname'.

Name phrases should stay as close to the exact registered name of the branch as possible, while obeying the grammatical requirements of the language used for lingua Societatis. Translated forms based on the meaning of branch names will not be registered under this allowance, even if the translated form matches the intended origin of the submission or of the branch.

For example, we would allow the forms of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected lingua Societatis forms in English. However, this rule would not allow the Kingdom of the East to use von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the rest of the submission was in German. Similarly, although the branch name Fontaine dans Sable is French, the branch in question is located in the United States. Thus, the branch could not use lingua Societatis to register the phrase de la Fontaine dans Sable as a fully French version of "of Fontaine dans Sable". That is, the branch could use Ordre du Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable or Order of the Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable, but it could not justify Ordre du Levrier de la Fontaine dans Sable under this rule, as this is not the lingua Societatis form of the branch name, even though it matches the intended origin of the submission. If Fontaine dans Sable can also be documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French order name; however that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance.

For example, the branch of Aarnimetsä in Finland could register Aarnimetsän Ordre du Levrier, transforming the branch name according to the rules of modern Finnish grammar.

For example, we would not allow of the Midrealm, as Midrealm is not the registered form of the Kingdom of the Middle.

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f. Branch Name Allowance: Name phrases may be created from the registered forms of SCA branches. Only The name phrase must use a lingua Societatis form meaning 'of Branchname' or 'from Branchname'. In English, the usual lingua Societatis form incorporating an SCA branch name is 'of Branchname'.

Name phrases should stay as close to the exact registered form of the branch name may be used, in the lingua Anglica form "of Branchname". name of the branch as possible, while obeying the grammatical requirements of the language used for lingua Societatis. Translated forms based on the meaning of branch names will not be registered under this allowance.allowance, even if the translated form matches the intended origin of the submission or of the branch.

For example, we would allow the forms of the East or of Fontaine dans Sable, as these are the expected lingua AnglicaSocietatis forms. in English. However, this rule would not allow the Kingdom of the East to use von Osten as a German translation of "of the East", even if the rest of the submission was in German. Similarly, it would not allow although the branch name Fontaine dans Sable is French, the branch in question is located in the United States. Thus, the branch could not use lingua Societatis to register the phrase de la Fontaine dans Sable as a fully French version of "of Fontaine dans Sable", even though the branch name is French. Sable". That is, we would allow the branch could use Ordre du Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable or Order of the Levrier of Fontaine dans Sable, but we would not allow it could not justify Ordre du Levrier de la Fontaine dans Sable under this rule, as this is not the lingua AnglicaSocietatis form of the branch name, even though it matches the intended origin of the submission. If Fontaine dans Sable can also be documented as an attested or constructed French name, de Fontaine dans Sable could be used in forming a fully French order name; however that would not be through the use of the branch name allowance. allowance.

For example, the branch of Aarnimetsä in Finland could register Aarnimetsän Ordre du Levrier, transforming the branch name according to the rules of modern Finnish grammar.

For example, we would not allow of the Midrealm, as this Midrealm is not the registered form of the Kingdom of the Middle.

***

Appendix E

Add

Any modern English language designator in the following lists may be used as a lingua Societatis designator.

to the beginning of Appendix E.

Throughout Appendix E, replace "English language and the lingua Anglica" or "English and lingua Anglica" by "modern English language".

* Society Pages

Please send information about happenings to major heralds and major happenings to all heralds to Laurel, so that it can be published here.

* Send What to Whom

Letters of Intent, Comment, Response, Correction, et cetera are to be posted to the OSCAR online system. No paper copies need be sent. All submission forms plus documentation, including petitions, must be posted to the OSCAR online system. While black-and-white emblazons must be included in the Letter of Intent, only colored armory forms need to be posted in the forms area.

Cheques or money orders for submissions, payable to "SCA Inc.-College of Arms" are to be sent to Trent Le Clair, 928 Frazier Dr, Walla Walla WA 99362

Send roster changes and corrections to Laurel. College of Arms members may also request a copy of the current roster from Laurel.

For a paper copy of a LoAR, please contact Laurel, at the address above. The cost for one LoAR is $3. Please make all checks or money orders payable to "SCA Inc.-College of Arms". The electronic copy of the LoAR is available free of charge. To subscribe to the mailings of the electronic copy, please see the bottom of http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/lists.html#lists for more instructions.

For all administrative matters, please contact Laurel.

* Scheduling

Items listed below in square brackets have not been scheduled yet. For information about future scheduling, please review the status table located on the Web at http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=137.

The February Laurel decisions were made at the Pelican meeting held on Sunday, February 16, 2020 and the Wreath meeting held on Sunday, February 9, 2020. These meetings considered the following letters of intent: Calontir (05 Nov, 2019), Æthelmearc (07 Nov, 2019), Middle (11 Nov, 2019), Lochac (14 Nov, 2019), Laurel (15 Nov, 2019), Northshield (24 Nov, 2019), Atenveldt (25 Nov, 2019), Ealdormere (25 Nov, 2019), Atlantia (26 Nov, 2019), Outlands (27 Nov, 2019), Ansteorra (29 Nov, 2019), An Tir (30 Nov, 2019), Artemisia (30 Nov, 2019), Caid (30 Nov, 2019), Drachenwald (30 Nov, 2019), East (30 Nov, 2019), Gleann Abhann (30 Nov, 2019), Gleann Abhann (30 Nov, 2019), Meridies (30 Nov, 2019), Middle (30 Nov, 2019), Trimaris (30 Nov, 2019), West (30 Nov, 2019), Laurel LoPaD (01 Dec, 2019), and Laurel LoPaD (31 Dec, 2019) (redraws). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Friday, January 31, 2020.

The March Laurel decisions were made at the Pelican meeting held on Sunday, March 8, 2020 and the Wreath meeting held on Sunday, March 15, 2020. These meetings considered the following letters of intent: Æthelmearc (07 Dec, 2019), Calontir (07 Dec, 2019), Avacal (18 Dec, 2019), An Tir (20 Dec, 2019), Ealdormere (24 Dec, 2019), Lochac (28 Dec, 2019), Artemisia (29 Dec, 2019), Caid (29 Dec, 2019), Atenveldt (30 Dec, 2019), Outlands (30 Dec, 2019), An Tir (31 Dec, 2019), Atlantia (31 Dec, 2019), Drachenwald (31 Dec, 2019), East (31 Dec, 2019), Meridies (31 Dec, 2019), Northshield (31 Dec, 2019), Laurel LoPaD (01 Jan, 2020), and Laurel LoPaD (03 Feb, 2020) (redraws). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Saturday, February 29, 2020.

The April Laurel decisions will be made at the Pelican meeting held on Saturday, April 11, 2020 and the Wreath meeting held on Saturday, April 18, 2020. These meetings will consider the following letters of intent: Calontir (03 Jan, 2020), Æthelmearc (04 Jan, 2020), An Tir (08 Jan, 2020), West (20 Jan, 2020), Middle (22 Jan, 2020), Æthelmearc (24 Jan, 2020), Ealdormere (24 Jan, 2020), Northshield (26 Jan, 2020), Artemisia (27 Jan, 2020), Avacal (29 Jan, 2020), Outlands (29 Jan, 2020), Atenveldt (30 Jan, 2020), Lochac (30 Jan, 2020), Ansteorra (31 Jan, 2020), Atlantia (31 Jan, 2020), Caid (31 Jan, 2020), Drachenwald (31 Jan, 2020), East (31 Jan, 2020), Gleann Abhann (31 Jan, 2020), Laurel LoPaD (31 Jan, 2020), Meridies (31 Jan, 2020), Trimaris (31 Jan, 2020), and Laurel LoPaD (01 Mar, 2020). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Tuesday, March 31, 2020.

Not all letters of intent may be considered when they are originally scheduled on this cover letter. The date of posting of the LoI, date of receipt of the Laurel packet, or other factors may delay consideration of certain letters of intent. Additionally, some letters of intent received may not have been scheduled because the administrative requirements (receipt of the forms packet, receipt of the necessary fees, et cetera) have not yet been met.

REMINDER: Until all administrative requirements are met, the letter may not be scheduled.

Pray know that I remain,

In service,

Juliana de Luna
Laurel Queen of Arms


Created at 2020-04-14T21:23:35