Society for Creative Anachronism
College of Arms

601 S Washington #137
Stillwater OK 74074
+1 405 428 3662
laurel@heraldry.sca.org

For the July 2021 meetings, printed September 12, 2021

To all the College of Arms and all others who may read this missive, from Emma Laurel, Elisabetta Pelican, and Oddr Wreath, greetings.

* From Laurel: Another Virtual Heralds Point Done!

Our second Virtual Heralds Point has been a success. As before, still more tweaks to the forms program, policies, and proceedures were made before the event, and more will be made after. Every time we do this, we hope to be improving the experience for everyone, submitters and heralds alike! And yes, this has been sufficiently popular that we will likely continue to do more VHPs in the future, although we have not yet decided when the next one will be. I know several kingdoms are working on allowing electronic payments for heraldic submissions directly, so the demand may lessen somewhat, but I suspect the usefulness (and fun!) of getting so many heralds and artists from across the Known World together will be sufficient to keep regular VHPs an ongoing concern.

I've asked Lillia de Vaux to give me the rundown. She reports:

We had 134 submitters from 18 kingdoms put through 259 submissions (Ansteorra won again!).

Key staff were Marie de Blois, Juliana de Luna, þorkell Palsson, Owen Tegg, and Groza Novgorodskaia. On the Discord side, we also had some help from Alexandra (Shandra) Vazquez de Granada and Joscelin le esqurel. Tanczos Istvan made a lot of huge improvements to the forms program that helped cut down on repetitive and unnecessary work. Our seniors (not counting staff already listed) were Alys Mackyntoich, Alisoun MacCoul of Elphane, Jeanne Marie Lacroix, Iago ab Adam, Ursula Georges, Seraphina Delfino, Herveus d'Ormonde, Elsbeth Anne Roth, Beatrice Domenici della Campana, Shauna of Carrick Point, and Konstantia Kaloethina. And our clerks were Ollivier Le Floch and Alaric MacConnal. And lastly, Arwyn of Leicester and Li Xia from Avacal provided Zoom event advice.

All told, there were well over seventy volunteers in total who worked on this event, which is fantastic. This is amazing, and I thank each and every one of you.

* From Laurel: Updates to the Glossary of Terms and SENA

This month there are a number of updates to the Glossary of Terms and to SENA. Updates to the Glossary of Terms and SENA appendices will be available at http://heraldry.sca.org/coagloss.html and http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html within a day or two of publication of this Cover Letter. However, updates to the main sections of SENA require approval from the Board of Directors prior to publication of those updates on the website. Names and armory submitted between now and that approval will be evaluated in accordance with the updates below on the assumption that the Board will approve the changes.

* From Laurel: Updates to the Glossary of Terms

Based on the proposed updates found in Palimpsest's April 17th and April 28th Rules Letters and the commentary received, the Glossary of Terms has been updated. The revised Glossary of Terms will be published within the next several days. In summary, these changes include:

* From Laurel: Update to SENA GP3

We are updating SENA GP3 as proposed by Palimpsest on the April 17, 2021 Rules Letter. These changes align GP3 with the current SCA Governing Documents (as revised March 3, 2021). The new wording:

GP.3. Definition of Period

Various rules, especially the content and style rules, refer to the idea of period. This section explains what the term period means for the purposes of these rules.

The center of the Society is medieval and Renaissance Europe. As in the Governing Documents, period is defined as "pre-17th Century". Elements and patterns of names and heraldry found in the Middle Ages and Renaissance are allowed. While the focus is on the Middle Ages and Renaissance, we register documentable elements and patterns from before the Middle Ages so long as they can adequately be described by standard SCA terms (for armory) and Latin characters (for names). Thus while we will register, for example, classical Greek, Arabic, and Japanese names, they must be transliterated into Latin characters.

Elements and patterns documented in use during the "grey period," between 1600 and 1650, are generally allowed. This is on the grounds that they might have been in earlier use. The use of a name element by a human being during the grey period is generally sufficient to allow this use, even if it is the name of an infant. However, if there is evidence that the element or pattern could not have been in use before 1600, such as documentation for a name in 1615 which specifically says that it was coined in that year, then it will not be allowed.

In any case, elements and patterns are only allowed when they do not otherwise violate the rules, such as offense or presumption rules.

The insert/delete version:

GP.3. Definition of Period

Various rules, especially the content and style rules, refer to the idea of period. This section explains what the term period means for the purposes of these rules.

A. Temporal Definition: The center of the Society is medieval and Renaissance Europe. As in the Governing Documents, period is defined as "pre-17th Century". Elements and patterns of names and heraldry found in the Middle Ages and Renaissance (in those places defined below) are allowed. While the focus is on the Middle Ages and Renaissance, we We register documentable elements and patterns from before the Middle Ages, but require them to be from cultures that were known to medieval and Renaissance Europeans. Therefore, classical Greek and Roman names are registerable, but names recorded only in Egyptian hieroglyphs are not. so long as they can adequately be described by standard SCA terms (for armory) and Latin characters (for names). Thus while we will register, for example, classical Greek, Arabic, and Japanese names, they must be transliterated into Latin characters.

Elements and patterns documented in use during the "grey period," between 1600 and 1650, are generally allowed. This is on the grounds that they might have been in earlier use. The use of a name element by a human being during the grey period is generally sufficient to allow this use, even if it is the name of an infant. However, if there is evidence that the element or pattern could not have been in use before 1600, such as documentation for a name in 1615 which specifically says that it was coined in that year, then it will not be allowed.

As we require elements and patterns to be temporally compatible, artistic designs that are only in use before a heraldic tradition existed may not be registered as part of armory.

In any case, elements and patterns are only allowed when they do not otherwise violate the rules, such as offense or presumption rules.

B. Geographic Definition: The center of the Society is medieval and Renaissance Europe.

In names, elements and patterns found in Europe (in the times defined in Section A above) are allowed for all types of personal and non-personal names. We allow elements and patterns for personal names from beyond Europe, but we require them to be from cultures that were known to medieval and Renaissance Europeans or whose members might reasonably have traveled to Europe. We allow non-personal names from places beyond Europe only when the entity in question could have traveled to Europe. Thus, we allow household names of non-European origin, but not branch names. For the same reason, we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles.

In armory, we allow elements and patterns from European heraldic traditions. We also allow elements and patterns from "heraldic" traditions from other regions when their owners might have reasonably traveled with that armory to Europe. However, we do require those elements to follow more stringent rules. As we require elements and patterns to be from the same location, artistic designs that are not part of a heraldic tradition may not be registered as part of armory.

As we require elements and patterns to be temporally compatible, artistic designs that are only in use before a heraldic tradition existed may not be registered as part of armory.

In any case, elements and patterns are only allowed when they do not otherwise violate the rules, such as offense or presumption rules.

* From Pelican: Updates to NPN1B, Designators

The removal of GP3.B, discussed above, requires removal of references to that section in SENA NPN1B, Designators. The first change is under Branch Designators and the second is under Heraldic Titles. The revised wording of those two sections is:

1. Branch Designators: The standard English designators for branches (local SCA groups) are established by the Governing Documents. The list may be found in Appendix E of this document. These designators are considered to be compatible with any place name construction. This is true whether or not period forms can be found with such a designator. Shires are not limited to the forms of English shires, nor baronies to the kinds of names found for baronies in period. In addition, each type of branch may be registered with other designators suitable for that branch type. In particular, a college may be named following the pattern of medieval colleges.

The standard English designators may be used in the lingua Societatis form Designator of X regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation of a standard English designator may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Translations of the designator for the appropriate branch type into a medieval language may also be used; however, in this case, the documented form of the designator should be consistent in language with the substantive phrase. A list of the standard English designators and some previously registered translations can be found in Appendix E.

In general, changes of status for a branch, such as changing from shire to barony, do not need to be submitted. The Laurel office does not track those changes in status (that being a duty of the Seneschal and Board of Directors). However, it will acknowledge them when a new submission is made. The exception is when a branch wants the approval of a new alternate form of the branch designator, such as a newly documented medieval spelling of the designator. Such approval requires Laurel approval, but is an administrative action (which does not require fees) and does not delay the change in status.

4. Heraldic Titles: The designators for heraldic titles must follow a documented pattern for heraldic titles. In English, the standard lingua Societatis terms for heraldic titles for kingdoms and local branches are Herald and Pursuivant. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take a lingua Societatis form, or they may take the language of the substantive element. The designator Principal Herald and its translations are restricted to the chief herald of a kingdom. The designator King/Queen/Sovereign of Arms and its translations are restricted to the Laurel office. In general, changes of designator, for example from Pursuivant to Herald, do not need to be submitted to the Laurel office; if submitted, they are administrative actions, which do not require fees.

For example, the Kingdom of the West could register a heraldic title based on the German placename Funffprun either in the entirely German form Funffprun Herold or in the lingua Societatis form Funffprun Herald. However, the West could not register Funffprun Herault, as Herault is a French term for heralds. On the other hand, because French is one of the national languages of Canada, the Kingdom of Ealdormere could register Funffprun Herault with a French designator by using lingua Societatis.

We do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles. This applies to both the designator and the substantive elements of such heraldic titles.

The insert/delete version of these changes:

1. Branch Designators: The standard English designators for branches (local SCA groups) are established by the Governing Documents. The list may be found in Appendix E of this document. These designators are considered to be compatible with any place name construction. This is true whether or not period forms can be found with such a designator. Shires are not limited to the forms of English shires, nor baronies to the kinds of names found for baronies in period. In addition, each type of branch may be registered with other designators suitable for that branch type. In particular, a college may be named following the pattern of medieval colleges.

The standard English designators may be used in the lingua Societatis form Designator of X regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Similarly, following the guidelines in NPN.1.A, a lingua Societatis translation of a standard English designator may be used, together with any appropriate prepositions, regardless of the language of the substantive phrase. Translations of the designator for the appropriate branch type into a medieval language may also be used; however, in this case, the documented form of the designator should be consistent in language with the substantive phrase. A list of the standard English designators and some previously registered translations can be found in Appendix E.

In general, changes of status for a branch, such as changing from shire to barony, do not need to be submitted. The Laurel office does not track those changes in status (that being a duty of the Seneschal and Board of Directors). However, it will acknowledge them when a new submission is made. The exception is when a branch wants the approval of a new alternate form of the branch designator, such as a newly documented medieval spelling of the designator. Such approval requires Laurel approval, but is an administrative action (which does not require fees) and does not delay the change in status.

As discussed in GP.3.B, we only allow non-personal names from locations beyond Europe when the entity in question could have traveled to Europe. As branches could not have so traveled, designators for branch names may only be in languages used in medieval and Renaissance Europe or in modern, lingua Societatis forms.

4. Heraldic Titles: The designators for heraldic titles must follow a documented pattern for heraldic titles. In English, the standard lingua Societatis terms for heraldic titles for kingdoms and local branches are Herald and Pursuivant. Any pattern suitable for one such designator is suitable for the other. These designators may take a lingua Societatis form, or they may take the language of the substantive element. The designator Principal Herald and its translations are restricted to the chief herald of a kingdom. The designator King/Queen/Sovereign of Arms and its translations are restricted to the Laurel office. In general, changes of designator, for example from Pursuivant to Herald, do not need to be submitted to the Laurel office; if submitted, they are administrative actions, which do not require fees.

For example, the Kingdom of the West could register a heraldic title based on the German placename Funffprun either in the entirely German form Funffprun Herold or in the lingua Societatis form Funffprun Herald. However, the West could not register Funffprun Herault, as Herault is a French term for heralds. On the other hand, because French is one of the national languages of Canada, the Kingdom of Ealdormere could register Funffprun Herault with a French designator by using Llingua Societatis.

As discussed in GP.3.B, wWe do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles. This applies to both the designator and the substantive elements of such heraldic titles.

* From Laurel: Updates to SENA GP4F

SENA GP4F, Definitions of Terms Used in these Rules, is updated to change the terminology from step from period practice to step from core practice and to match the definition found in the Glossary of Terms. This replaces the existing definition for step from period practice:

F. Step From Core Practice: This term refers to the idea that while certain armorial elements were not used in period core style armory, as defined in SENA A2 and A3, they are close enough to period elements as to be allowed for use or have been declared registerable in the past on the basis of their great popularity in the SCA. A step from core practice is an element or combination of elements not found in period armory that we nonetheless allow.

* From Pelican: On the Given Name Rhiannon

This month we considered a submission using the given name Rhiannon. This given name was originally declared "SCA-compatible" on the June 1996 Cover Letter. The May 2008 Cover Letter then disallowed SCA-compatible names from registration as of the May 2009 Pelican decision meeting, including Rhiannon, that could not be otherwise be documented to period. This Cover Letter allowed that names previously ruled SCA-compatible could be registered if suitable documentation was provided.

Riannon was documented on the Letter of Intent as a literary name, and there is a pattern of Welsh literary names entering the Welsh naming pool [Drystan ap Ercwlff, 10/2020, A-Avacal]. As was noted by Alys Ogress in commentary, "Given that we have examples of normal humans using the names Arawn, Gwri, Gwythyr, Mabon, Gwyn, and Gwion, it makes no sense to hold the more famous (but no less legendary) Rhiannon to a higher standard. Our operating theory that normal humans were not named after fictional characters from Welsh mythology has been disrupted by data." We agree. Therefore, as of this Cover Letter, the given names Riannon (pre-16th and 16th century Welsh) and Rhiannon (16th century Welsh) may be registered as Welsh literary names.

* From Pelican: Documenting Names from Sources in the Admin Handbook Appendix F

Of late, we have seen several submissions that documented some or all elements of a name from sources listed in the Administrative Handbook, Appendix F: Names Sources to Be Avoided in Documentation. As consulting heralds, we need to be cognizant of the quality of our sources as the standards for registration evolve and change. Using sources that the College of Arms has already evaluated as "not good documentation" does a disservice to your submitters and your fellow commentary heralds. Names documented from Appendix F sources such as Hanks & Hodges must be redocumented, which takes up time and energy that could be spent on other submissions. Sometimes the heralds at the Pelican meeting are able to save such submissions and sometimes they aren't. Registration of a name originally documented from one of these sources does not mean that the source itself was good to begin with.

The Laurel team recently completed a large update to the Administrative Handbook, Appendices F and H. We remind heralds that this information was published on the April 2021 Cover Letter, with the note "Over 50 sources are being added to Appendix H and many of the existing and new sources now have urls for ease of access." This work was done to make it easier to find good sources for documentation.

Some confusion has been noted with Appendix F as there are two sections - sources that should not be used at all and sources that should be used with caution. To help eliminate that confusion Palimpsest has been directed to update the title and introduction of the appendix to clarify the purpose of those two sections.

All active heralds should be deeply familiar with the contents of the Administrative Handbook (http://heraldry.sca.org/admin.html), including the Appendices. These resources are made available for both your benefit and your submitters' benefit. Please utilize them for this purpose.

* From Wreath: Update to SENA A1A - Definitions of Rule Sets

SENA A1A is updated to reflect the change from "steps from period practice" to "steps from core practice" as proposed on Palimpsest's Rules Letter of April 17, 2021. The new wording:

A.1. Armory Style Principles

A. Definitions of Rule Sets: We require an armorial submission to be compatible with period armorial content and style. We consider a design that follows attested patterns for armorial content and style within our period to meet this requirement. There are two ways to follow attested patterns:

1. Core Style Rules: Designs that follow the rules in A.2 and A.3 below meet this requirement. These sections comprise our core style. Our core style is not identical to the style of any single specific place and time, although it is based on the dominant style in medieval Western Europe, the Anglo-Norman style.

Some of those rules require documentation of an element, demonstrating that it is attested or constructed. In some cases, these rules or the Appendices are sufficient documentation. For example, a submitter might demonstrate that a plant was known to period Europeans.

Submissions that are documented under the core style rules are allowed to have a single step from core practice, sometimes denoted as SFCP. In older rulings this same concept was described as a weirdness or a step from period practice. A step from core practice is an element not found in period, core style armory that we nonetheless allow. Some types of elements which are designated as a step from core practice are mentioned in the style rules. In addition, a partial list of elements that are a step from core practice is found in Appendix G. Any armorial submissions with more than one step from core practice will not be registered under the core style rules.

2. Individually Attested Patterns: Designs which follow period examples but do not fall within the core style rules in A.2 and A.3 may instead meet the style standards of the Individually Attested Pattern rules as explained in A.4.

Under the Individually Attested Pattern rules, all elements (including charges, arrangement, complexity, etc.) of the armorial design must be documented as appropriate for the armorial style of a single time and place within the temporal scope of the Society. Elements which would be considered a step from core practice under the core style rules may only be used under the Individually Attested Pattern rules when documented as being used in the time and place as the rest of the submission.

Non-European armorial designs often do not fit into the core style rules, and thus may need to use the Individually Attested Pattern rules in order to be registered.

The insert/delete version:

A.1. Armory Style Principles

A. Definitions of Rule Sets: We require an armorial submission to be compatible with period armorial content and style. We consider a design that follows attested patterns for armorial content and style within our period to meet this requirement. There are two ways to follow attested patterns:

1. Core Style Rules: Designs that follow the Core Style rules in A.2 and A.3 below meet this requirement. These sections comprise our core style. Our core style is not identical to the style of any single specific place and time, although it is based on the dominant style in medieval Western Europe, the Anglo-Norman style.

Some of those rules require documentation of an element, demonstrating that it is attested or constructed. In some cases, these rules or the Appendices are sufficient documentation. For example, a submitter might demonstrate that a plant was known to period Europeans.

Submissions that are documented under the Ccore Sstyle rules are allowed to have a single step from periodcore practice, sometimes denoted as SFPPSFCP. In older rulings this same concept was described as a weirdness or a step from period practice. A step from periodcore practice is an element not found in period, core style armory that we nonetheless allow. Some types of elements which are designated as a step from periodcore practice are mentioned in the style rules. In addition, a partial list of elements that are a step from periodcore practice is found in Appendix FG. Any armorial submissions with more than one step from periodcore practice will not be registered under the Ccore Sstyle rules.

2. Individually Attested Patterns: Designs which follow period examples but do not fall within the core style rules in A.2 and A.3 may instead meet the style standards of the Individually Attested Pattern rules as explained in A.4.

Under the Individually Attested Pattern rules, all elements (including charges, arrangement, complexity, etc.) of the armorial design must be documented as appropriate for the armorial style of a single time and place within the temporal scope of the Society. Elements which would be considered a step from periodcore practice under the Ccore Sstyle rules may only be used under the Individually Attested Pattern rules when documented as being used in the time and place as the rest of the submission.

Non-European armorial designs often do not fit into the core style rules, and thus may need to use the Individually Attested Pattern rules in order to be registered.

* From Wreath: Update to SENA A2B - Standard for Elements

SENA A2B1, A2B2, and A2B4 are updated to change the references from "steps from period practice" to "steps from core practice" and to remove the geographic limitations in line with the March 3, 2021 revision to the SCA Governing Documents. These changes were on Palimpsest's April 17th Rules Letter. The revised text:

B. Standards for Elements: To be used in armorial submissions without penalty, armorial elements must meet one of the following standards.

1. Attested Elements: Armorial elements are registerable if they are attested in period armory. Designs found in a period roll of arms or a treatise on armory meet this standard, even if it is unclear from the treatise if the element was used in actual heraldry. Elements used in arms, in badges, and in crests all meet this standard. Elements must be used and combined in the same ways they were used in period armory and must be describable in standard SCA terms.

For example, while both bees and the rampant posture are found in period armory, we do not allow a rampant bee, because only quadrupeds were found in the rampant posture in period armory.

Tinctures and their classifications are discussed in A.3.B.1 below. Discussions of charges and other elements that do not need to be further documented can be found in Appendix F.

2. Constructed Elements: Elements that follow a pattern for the formation of period charges are registerable. Some patterns that have been documented include:

a. Tools: There is a pattern of creating new charges from tools and other everyday artifacts. Thus, an item that can be documented as this sort of period artifact is registerable.

b. Plants and Animals: There is a pattern of creating new charges from plants and animals. Thus an item that can be documented as a plant or animal known in period is registerable.

Plants and animals that did not appear until after 1600, such as many breeds of dogs, are not registerable. Those attested during the grey period receive the benefit of the doubt, unless there is a reason to believe they first appeared after 1600.

c. Constructed Monsters: There is a pattern of creating monsters by combining elements from different animals and monsters used in heraldry. Thus, a new monster that follows these patterns is registerable. Items which can be constructed using this rule are registerable, even if it recreates a named heraldic monster which is demonstrated to be a wholly post-period invention in real-world heraldry.

For example, there is a pattern of combining the top half of quadrupeds with a fish tail to make a creature, as in a heraldic sea-horse. This pattern can be used to create an unattested sea-camel.

Note: section A2B3 is unchanged.

4. Elements which are a Step from Core Practice: Some elements are allowed but are considered a step from core practice. An armorial design may have no more than one such step. A design submitted under the core style rules with more than one step from core practice will be returned. For charges, a single example of that charge used in armory during our period is usually sufficient to allow its use without being a step from core practice.

a. Plants and Animals: Plants and animals which cannot be documented to before 1600 (from the interior of Africa, northern Asia, or parts of the Americas that were not systematically explored by Europeans before 1600, for example) but can be shown to have likely been known to period people are registerable with a step from core practice. While grey period citations will be considered, the great expansion of knowledge gained about the world between 1600 and 1650 means that the burden of proof of pre-1600 knowledge here is slightly higher.

Attested depictions of fantastical plants or animals are also registerable with a step from core practice under this rule, if they can be shown to be known before 1600 and have a standard enough depiction to be identifiable. However, their postures and orientations must be describable in standard blazon in order to be registered.

b. Other Artifacts: There is no pattern of using artifacts other than tools and general, everyday artifacts in core style armory. The use of such an artifact, such as an aeolipile, as a charge is considered a step from core practice.

c. Post-Period Elements: A handful of elements not found in period heraldry have been explicitly allowed, though their use is a step from core practice. A partial list of them is included in Appendix G.

The insert/delete version:

B. Standards for Elements: To be used in armorial submissions without penalty, armorial elements must meet one of the following standards.

1. Attested Elements: Armorial elements are registerable if they are attested in period European armory. Designs found in a period roll of arms or a treatise on armory meet this standard, even if it is unclear from the treatise if the element was used in actual heraldry. Elements used in arms, in badges, and in crests all meet this standard. Elements must be used and combined in the same ways they were used in period armory and must be describable in standard SCA terms.

For example, while both bees and the rampant posture are found in period armory, we do not allow a rampant bee, because only quadrupeds were found in the rampant posture in period armory.

Tinctures and their classifications are discussed in A.3.B.1 below. Discussions of charges and other elements that do not need to be further documented can be found in Appendix F.

2. Constructed Elements: Elements that follow a pattern for the formation of period charges are registerable. Some patterns that have been documented include:

a. Tools: There is a pattern of creating new charges from European tools and other everyday artifacts. Thus, an item that can be documented as this sort of period artifact is registerable.

b. Plants and Animals: There is a pattern of creating new charges from European plants and animals. Thus an item that can be documented as a plant or animal foundknown in period Europe is registerable.

European plantsPlants and animals that did not appear until after 1600, such as many breeds of dogs, are not registerable. Those attested during the graygrey period receive the benefit of the doubt, unless there is a reason to believe they first appeared after 1600.

c. Constructed Monsters: There is a pattern of creating monsters by combining elements from different animals and monsters used in heraldry. Thus, a new monster that follows these patterns is registerable. Items which can be constructed using this rule are registerable, even if it recreates a named heraldic monster which is demonstrated to be a wholly post-period invention in real-world heraldry.

For example, there is a pattern of combining the top half of quadrupeds with a fish tail to make a creature, as in a heraldic sea-horse. This pattern can be used to create an unattested sea-bearcamel.

Note: section A2B3 is unchanged.

4. Elements which are a Step from PeriodCore Practice: Some elements are allowed but are considered a step from periodcore practice. An armorial design may have no more than one such step. A design submitted under the Ccore Sstyle Rrules with more than one step from periodcore practice will be returned. For charges, a single example of that charge used in Europeanarmory during our period is usually sufficient to allow its use without being a step from periodcore practice.

a. Non-European Armorial Elements: Elements found only in non-European armorial traditions (e.g., Islamic and Japanese heraldry) are registerable but a step from period practice. The use of two such elements requires the use of the Individually Attested Pattern rules, discussed in A.4. These elements must still be describable in standard SCA heraldic terms. The use of elements found in period European armory is not a step from period practice, even if they were also used in non-European contexts.

b. Non-Europeana.Plants and Animals: Plants and animals from outside Europe which were known to Europeans in period are registerable but a step from period practice. This includes plants and animals from the New World, Africa, and Asia. The few such animals used as period charges or crests are registerable as period charges, without a step from period practice. However, there are not enough of them to allow a general pattern for the use of any non-European animals and plants. Plants and animals which cannot be documented to be known to Europeans before 1600 (from the interior of Africa, northern Asia, or parts of the Americas that were not systematically explored by Europeans before 1600, for example) but can be shown to have likely been known to period people will not be registered are registerable with a step from core practice. While grey period citations will be considered, the great expansion of knowledge Europeans gained about the rest of the world between 1600 and 1650 means that the burden of proof of pre-1600 knowledge here is slightly higher.

Attested depictions of fantastical plants or animals from outside Europe are also registerable with a step from periodcore practice under this rule, if they can be shown to be known to Europeans before 1600 and have a standard enough depiction to be identifiable. However, their postures and orientations must be describable in standard blazon in order to be registered.

cb. Other European Artifacts: There is no pattern of using European artifacts other than tools and general, everyday artifacts in core style armory. The use of such an artifact, such as an aeolipile, as a charge is considered a step from periodcore practice.

dc. Post-Period Elements: A handful of elements not found in period heraldry have been explicitly allowed, though their use is a step from periodcore practice. A list of them is included in Appendix G.

* From Wreath: Updates to SENA Appendices

SENA Appendix F, Some Armorial Elements that Do Not Need Further Documentation, is revised as proposed in Palimpsest's April 17th Rules Letter to replace the term step from period practice with step from core practice.

SENA Appendix G, Some Specific Elements that are a Step from Core Practice, is revised as proposed in Palimpsest's April 17th Rules Letter to replace the term step from period practice with step from core practice. It also removes non-European plants, animals, and armorial charges from the list of elements that are considered to be a step from core practice.

SENA Appendix M, Some Resources for Conflict Checking, is revised as proposed in Palimpsest's April 27th Rules Letter. The appendix has been reformatted for ease of use and to add information from precedent to various sections. This includes:

Heralds are encouraged to use this appendix when conflict checking.

* From Wreath: Charges Crowned Proper

Five items appear in the O&A as crowned proper - four important non-SCA badges and one important non-SCA arms. Crowns do not have a proper defined in the SCA and various depictions of these crowns are found in period (and modern) sources. As the presence of the crown does not contribute to difference, their tincture likewise does not contribute to difference. Therefore we decline to define the exact tincture of the crowns in these cases. The protected armory is:

These charges are also listed as restricted charges in the Glossary of Terms. While the crown doesn't contribute to difference for conflict purposes, the uncrowned charges are not restricted.

* Society Pages

On July 11, 2021, at the Ethereal Court of Their Majesties Tindal and Alberic of the East Kingdom, Audrye Beneyt, currently Eastern Crown Herald, was elevated to the Order of the Pelican.

On August 21, 2021, at Crown Tournament, Their Majesties of {AE}thelmearc Maynard and Liadain bestowed on Forveleth Dunde, herald-at-large, an Award of Arms.

At East Kingdom Etherial Court on August 26, Their Majesties Magnus Tindal and Alberic elevated Rosina von Schaffhausen, Jongleur Herald, to the Order of the Laurel.

At Meridian Virtual Court on August 26, Their Majesties Timothy and Ysmay invited Sara al-Garnatiyya, Spark Herald, into the Order of the Velvet Owl, the kingdom's grant-level arts and sciences honor.

At this same Meridian court, Their Majesties invited Catylyn Wen, Cypher Herald, into the Order of the Burning Trumpet. The Burning Trumpet is a Meridian Order which specifically recognizes heraldic service.

At Carolingia's Virtual Court on September 6, Their Excellencies Thomas and Raziya entered Ané{zv}ka Li{sv}ka z Kolína, Pantheon Herald, into the Order of the Daystar. The Daystar is the Barony of Carolingia's service award.

Please send information about happenings to major heralds and major happenings to all heralds to Laurel, so that it can be published here.

* Send What to Whom

Letters of Intent, Comment, Response, Correction, et cetera are to be posted to the OSCAR online system. No paper copies need be sent. All submission forms plus documentation, including petitions, must be posted to the OSCAR online system. While black-and-white emblazons must be included in the Letter of Intent, only colored armory forms need to be posted in the forms area.

Cheques or money orders for submissions, payable to "SCA Inc.-College of Arms" are to be sent to Trent Le Clair, 928 Frazier Dr, Walla Walla WA 99362

Send roster changes and corrections to Laurel. College of Arms members may also request a copy of the current roster from Laurel.

For a paper copy of a LoAR, please contact Laurel, at the address above. The cost for one LoAR is $3. Please make all checks or money orders payable to "SCA Inc.-College of Arms". The electronic copy of the LoAR is available free of charge. To subscribe to the mailings of the electronic copy, please see the bottom of http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/lists.html#lists for more instructions.

For all administrative matters, please contact Laurel.

* Scheduling

Items listed below in square brackets have not been scheduled yet. For information about future scheduling, please review the status table located on the Web at http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=137.

The July Laurel decisions were made at the Pelican meeting held on Sunday, July 18, 2021 and the Wreath meeting held on Saturday, July 3, 2021. These meetings considered the following letters of intent: Trimaris (01 Apr, 2021), Meridies (02 Apr, 2021), Calontir (07 Apr, 2021), Laurel LoPaD (11 Apr, 2021), An Tir (12 Apr, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (17 Apr, 2021), Æthelmearc (22 Apr, 2021), Atlantia (24 Apr, 2021), Ealdormere (24 Apr, 2021), Atenveldt (25 Apr, 2021), Gleann Abhann (25 Apr, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (27 Apr, 2021), Lochac (28 Apr, 2021), Outlands (28 Apr, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (28 Apr, 2021), Atlantia (29 Apr, 2021), Caid (29 Apr, 2021), Ansteorra (30 Apr, 2021), Avacal (30 Apr, 2021), Drachenwald (30 Apr, 2021), Northshield (30 Apr, 2021), West (30 Apr, 2021), Laurel LoPaD (19 May, 2021) (redraws), Laurel LoPaD (02 Jun, 2021) (redraws). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Wednesday, June 30, 2021.

The August Laurel decisions were made at the Pelican meeting held on Sunday, August 8, 2021 and the Wreath meeting held on Sunday, August 1, 2021. These meetings considered the following letters of intent: Middle (05 May, 2021), An Tir (10 May, 2021), Calontir (11 May, 2021), Artemisia (16 May, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (18 May, 2021), Atlantia (22 May, 2021), Ealdormere (24 May, 2021), Gleann Abhann (24 May, 2021), Lochac (24 May, 2021), Ealdormere (25 May, 2021), Æthelmearc (28 May, 2021), Avacal (28 May, 2021), Outlands (28 May, 2021), Caid (29 May, 2021), Atenveldt (30 May, 2021), Drachenwald (31 May, 2021), East (31 May, 2021), Northshield (31 May, 2021), West (31 May, 2021). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Saturday, July 31, 2021.

The September Laurel decisions were made at the Pelican meeting held on Sunday, September 12, 2021 and the Wreath meeting held on Saturday, September 11, 2021. These meetings considered the following letters of intent: Meridies (01 Jun, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (01 Jun, 2021), Trimaris (01 Jun, 2021), Calontir (02 Jun, 2021), Palimpsest Rules Letter (02 Jun, 2021), Ansteorra (03 Jun, 2021), West (03 Jun, 2021), Atlantia (04 Jun, 2021), Middle (07 Jun, 2021), An Tir (10 Jun, 2021), Artemisia (17 Jun, 2021), Æthelmearc (19 Jun, 2021), Northshield (21 Jun, 2021), Outlands (23 Jun, 2021), Ealdormere (24 Jun, 2021), Atenveldt (25 Jun, 2021), Atlantia (28 Jun, 2021), Avacal (30 Jun, 2021), Caid (30 Jun, 2021), Drachenwald (30 Jun, 2021), East (30 Jun, 2021), Lochac (30 Jun, 2021). All commentary, responses, and rebuttals should have been entered into OSCAR by Tuesday, August 31, 2021.

Not all letters of intent may be considered when they are originally scheduled on this cover letter. The date of posting of the LoI, date of receipt of the Laurel packet, or other factors may delay consideration of certain letters of intent. Additionally, some letters of intent received may not have been scheduled because the administrative requirements (receipt of the forms packet, receipt of the necessary fees, et cetera) have not yet been met.

REMINDER: Until all administrative requirements are met, the letter may not be scheduled.

Pray know that I remain,

In service,

Emma de Fetherstan
Laurel Queen of Arms


Created at 2021-09-12T20:25:50