PRECEDENTS OF THE S.C.A. COLLEGE OF ARMS

The Tenure of Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme

Returns by Name

Aaron Clearwater. Device. Or, a winged talbot passant vert, in chief two dragon's tongues addorsed gules, a ford proper.


The one registration of a "dragon's tongue" in the SCA, back in 1973, does not make it an identifiable charge. Nor does it seem in keeping with period armory: tongues were not used as charges, so far as I know.


Several commenters suggested that these be reblazoned "dragon's tails". Conceptually, this would be much more acceptable: lion's tails and fox's tails were used as period charges, and I'd have no problem with correctly drawn dragon's tails. But the feature that marks these charges as dragon's tails are the barbs at the ends -- which were not found on period dragons. (See the dragons and wyverns in Dennys' Heraldic Imagination, pp.190-191 and the plate opposite p.177; or the Oxford Guide to Heraldry, pp.102, 109, and plate 16.) I might consider tail's barbs to be artistic license, when the tail is part of a full dragon; but I cannot accept a charge whose identifying feature is a post-period artistic detail.


Either as dragon's tongues or dragon's tails, the charges here may not be registered. Dragon's tails drawn in a period style should be acceptable. You might also try to persuade him to simplify the design as well. 08/92

Aaron de Hameldene. Device. Sable, on a pale argent a hippopotamus statant contourny azure, overall a mount rayonny counterchanged.


The rayonny line on the mount is not drawn in a bold medieval style, but in a modern "pinking shears" style. This has been a reason for return ere now (v. College of Caer Daibhidh, July 90). There are a few period examples of overall charges counterchanged: e.g. Alwell, c.1586, Argent, a pile sable, overall a chevron counterchanged. These examples all seem to use ordinaries surmounting ordinaries. I am perfectly willing to permit overall charges in the SCA to be counterchanged, so long as they too are ordinaries (or charges of similar simplicity, such as roundels). 07/92

Adrian O'Kells. Name.


Kells is a patronymic surname, derived from the given name Kel, Chel (from the ON Kettil): "Kell's [son]". Therefore, it should not be used in a patronymic construction such as O'[given name]; either the O' or the final s should be deleted. Judging from the submitter's forms, he might have intended to be "from Kells", the Kilkenny monastery noted for its scribes; that would have made the byname of Kells or possibly o' Kells. Unfortunately, the submitter disallowed any changes whatsoever to the name, so we couldn't perform even the minor surgeries noted above. The name must therefore be returned. 06/93

Adrianna MacAverr. Badge. (fieldless) A garden rose azure, slipped and leaved argent.


This conflicts with Alys of the Midnight Rose (SCA): Or, a rose slipped and leaved azure. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for garden rose vs. heraldic rose; and we have traditionally granted no difference for a flower's slipping and leaving (either its existence, or its tincture), believing this to be little more than artistic license.


A similar argument brings this into conflict with Alyanora of Vinca (SCA): Argent, a periwinkle proper. Alyanora's flower is indistinguishable from an heraldic rose azure.


If someone can provide evidence that slipping and leaving was considered a cadency difference by period heralds, we'll reconsider these conflicts. Until then, they must stand. 01/93

Aedhán Brecc. Device. Vair, on a bend Or a wolf passant sable.


This conflicts with the device of William of Jutland (SCA): Vair, on a bend Or a label of seven points sable. It also conflicts with the mundane arms of Norman McCaskie (Lyon Ordinary II, p.26): Vair, on a bend Or three crosses urdée gules. In each case there's a single CD, for the changes to the charges on the bend.


It also conflicts with the device of Ceri of Glanymorniwi (SCA): Potent in point, on a bend Or in chief a garden rose slipped and leaved azure. Again, there's a CD for the changes to the tertiary charge; but we grant no difference for the artistic distinctions among the vair-type furs. That is, no difference for vair vs. vair ancient (indeed, we don't even blazon this, leaving it to the artist), no difference for vair vs. potent, no difference for vair in pale vs. vair in point vs. counter-vair, etc. 03/93

Aelfric the Kestrell. Household name for House Kestrell.


The household name submission was withdrawn by Lord Dragon, having been placed on the LOI by accident. 10/92

Aengus Ó Néill. Argent, in pale a hound rampant and a Catherine's wheel gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Jagow (Rietstap): D'argent à une roue de six rayons de gueules (Argent, a wheel of six spokes gules). There's a CD for adding the hound, but none for the changes to the wheel.

Aethelwine Aethelredson. Company name and badge for the Golden Swarm. (fieldless) A locust volant affronty Or.


The name lacks a designator (such as House, Guild, or Company), as required by Rule III.1.b. I don't believe Swarm can be used to refer to a group of humans. (If Swarm were considered the group designator, this would conflict with the Golden Horde.)


Though blazoned on the LOI as displayed, the locust is in fact volant affronty, which was deemed unacceptably non-heraldic on the LoAR of Oct 92. Even were it displayed, this would conflict with Freppel (Woodward 284): Azure, a bee Or. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but not for type of insect. 11/92

Aethelwine Aethelredson. Device. Sable, six locusts volant affronty Or.


Though blazoned on the LOI as displayed, the locusts are in fact volant affronty, which was deemed unacceptably non-heraldic on the LoAR of Oct 92.


Even were they displayed, this would conflict with Sceleros (Woodward 284); Gules, semy of bees volant Or. There's a CD for the field, but not for number or type of insects.


It also conflicts with the badge of the Emperor Napoleon: Azure, semy of bees Or. The badge was used on his coronation robes, and granted by him as an augmentation to Grand Dignitaries of the Empire. (von Volborth's Little Manual of Heraldry, p.59) There's again a single CD, for the field. 11/92

Aetheric Lindberende. Device. Per chevron throughout argent and gules, a gauntlet fesswise issuing a wing from the cuff and sustaining a shamshir, the whole in annulo counterchanged.


This submission suffers from a lack of recognizability of the design. The gauntlet is not winged but rather has an unrecognizable wing issuing from the cuff. The former would have eagle's wings [the default, according to Parker, pp. 622-3] from either side, whereas the latter seems to be a stylized feather in a nonstandard placement. If the sword, gauntlet and wing are considered one charge, since visually they are, this violates the provision against complex counterchanging. If considered as three distinct charges, they are of equal visual weight and this becomes "slot machine" heraldry, which is also prohibited. For all these reasons, this must be returned for redesign. 9/93

Aidan Aileran O'Comhraidhe. Badge change (resubmission). Per fess wavy azure and barry wavy Or and azure, two scythes in saltire argent.


A similar submission (Per fess wavy azure and argent, in base a bar wavy azure, overall two scythes in saltire argent) was returned May 92 for lack of contrast, and for conflict with the arms of Prayers (Papworth 1088), Gules, two scythes in saltire argent. Laurel held that "the visual effect of the bottom half of the field ... is of a field Per fess wavy azure [and] barry wavy argent and azure"; there was a single CD for field tincture.


The client has resubmitted in slightly different tinctures, providing sufficient contrast; but, although the LOI blazoned this again as a per fess field with a wavy bar in base, the visual effect is still of a per fess azure and barry wavy field. It was not unusual for barry or paly fields in period to be drawn with an odd number of traits (which we'd blazon as bars or palets); see, for example, the arms of Mouton (Multon, Moleton) found both as Barry argent and gules and Argent, three bars gules (DBA, pp 59, 88; Foster, p. 145). The distinction is even less noticeable when covering only a portion of the shield, as here; see, for example, the arms of von Rosenberg, whose Per fess field has in base either three bends or bendy depending upon the artist's whim (Siebmacher, p. 8; Neubecker and Rentzmann, p. 290). Even when the distiction is worth blazoning, it's worth no difference.


This remains a conflict with the arms of Prayers. The submitter might consider changing the number of scythes. Should he resubmit with this background, please have him draw the waves larger and bolder; this alone would have been sufficient reason for return. 9/93

Aine Callaghan. Badge. Vairy argent and purpure, semy of honeybees Or.


Conflicts with Sceleros (Woodward 284): Gules, semy of bees volant Or. There's a single CD, for the field.


It also conflicts with the badge of the Emperor Napoleon: Azure, semy of bees Or. The badge was used on his coronation robes, and granted by him as an augmentation to Grand Dignitaries of the Empire. (von Volborth's Little Manual of Heraldry, p.59) There's again a single CD, for the field. 11/92

Akilina O'Cinndeargain. Name.


The use of the Russian given name with the Irish patronymic violates our requirements for cultural contact, as outlined in Rule III.2. We need some evidence of period interaction between Russia and Ireland. (The device was registered under Jessica of Atenveldt.) 10/92

Akiyama Yoshiie.Device. Gules, on a "cherry blossom" within an octagon voided argent, four katanas in cross, tips to center sable.


The primary charge looks nothing like a cherry blossom, or indeed like any kind of flower. As drawn in Japanese Mon, the cherry blossom has five petals, each with a notch in the end. As drawn here, the charge looks more like a roundel invected -- with invecting shallow enough to warrant return, were it so blazoned. Please have the client resubmit with an identifiably drawn cherry blossom. 03/93

Al-Ishtiaq Khaalid bin al-Kaazim. Device. Gules crusily, on a roundel invected, its chief and base flory Or, a wingless boar-headed demon statant affronty, facing to sinister and maintaining a sword and an axe sable.


While the treatment of the bezant is a standard Persian artistic motif (documented by the submitter from a Turkish carpet), it isn't compatible with European heraldic style, and isn't reproducible from the blazon. (The above is the best we could do, and it's far from perfect.) Moreover, the flory bits of the bezant are not sufficiently identifiable on the crusily field. Given also its high complexity count (three tinctures, and five types of charge even if the demi-fleurs aren't counted separately), we have no compunction about returning this for simplification. 01/93

Alaric Greythorn of Glen Mor. Badge. (fieldless) An equal-armed Celtic cross quarter-pierced sable.


This conflicts, alas, with the mon of Hiyoki (Hawley 93): Dark, an equal-armed Celtic cross quarter-pierced light. (That's how it would be blazoned in European terms. I believe the Hiyoki charge is based on the kanji for the number 10.) There is a single CD, for tincturelessness; a comparison of the emblazons show the charges are identical. 9/93

Alaric Liutpold von Steinman. Device change resubmission. Gules, an antelope rampant between three crosses formy argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Buxtorf (Rietstap): De gueules au bouquetin rampant d'argent (Gules, an ibex rampant argent). According to Franklyn & Tanner (Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Heraldry, p.179), "the heraldic ibex is indistinguishable from the heraldic antelope and may even be merely an alternative term." There is thus a single CD, for adding the secondary charges.


I would grant a CD between a correctly drawn antelope and a deer; the two charges were distinct in period armory (unlike, say, the heraldic dolphin and the bottlenosed dolphin, between which we grant no difference). This would thus be clear of Geoffrey de Bradelei, cited in the LOI (Gules, a stag springing and in chief three crosses paty argent), though there's a strong visual echo.


If the client should resubmit with an antelope, please instruct him on the correct depiction of the horns: swept back, not forward. See Dennys' Heraldic Imagination, p.148. 09/92

Alaric of Wyvernwood. Household name for House RamSword.


RamSword does not appear to be a valid construction for a household name: the internal capitalization is implausible, and the word seems to have no meaning. By our rule of thumb on such names, if we wouldn't accept John RamSword (and we wouldn't!), we shouldn't accept House RamSword.


Moreover, if Ram is considered a modifier to the substantive element Sword, this conflicts with the Order of the Sword, a Swedish order of knighthood founded in 1522 (Franklyn & Tanner, p.322). The designator (House/Order) is transparent, and carries no difference; and the addition of the modifier is insufficient, per Rule V.2. 10/92

Alaric von Rottweil. Device. Gyronny of six gules and argent, a triskelion gammadion in annulo counterchanged.


The triskelion gammadion in annulo was one of the symbols of the Nazi SS, and is currently used in the logo of the pro-apartheid Afrikaaner Weerstandsbeweging. Its symbolism caused it to be disallowed on the LoAR of Sept 92, p.39. 11/92

Alberic Kentigern. Device. Per pale vert and argent, a torteau charged with five rays issuant from base throughout argent.


Returned for stylistic problems. While it is true that roundels may be charged with rayed objects in the SCA, those rayed objects are not normally issuant from the inner edge of a roundel. To have charges issuant from the edge of a roundel is to give the roundel the appearance of an inescutcheon of pretense. This appearance is heightened by the use of five tertiaries on the roundel. This is therefore returned for appearance of marshalling. Furthermore, the argent rays blend with the argent portion of the field, further hampering the identifiability. We suggest he resubmit with a single charge (we suggest a sunburst) entirely on the roundel, not issuant from it. 10/93

Alden Pharamond. Badge. (fieldless) A fountain palewise.


There is no evidence that fountains were ever borne in other than their default orientation. I consider the "rotation" of a fountain to be a change in its partition, from barry to (in this case) paly. By definition, it then ceases to be a fountain -- just as it would if the tinctures were changed, say, to gules and Or. This submission must therefore be considered a display, on a roundel, of Paly wavy argent and azure; and it thus conflicts with the arms of Amesley (Papworth 1017), Paly of six argent and azure, as cited in the LOI. 09/92

Aldric of Galway. Device. Azure, a pall inverted embattled Or between three natural dolphins naiant in annulo argent


As emblazoned, the pall is far too narrow, its embattlements too small. Medieval ordinaries were drawn with large, bold lines, the better to be seen from a distance. This must be returned for redrawing. 7/93

Aldric of Wolfden. Device. Sable, a wolf's head erased contourny within a bordure indented argent.


This armory was already registered, on the LoAR of Dec 91. Please instruct the submitter to draw the bordure, and its indentations, larger. 01/93

Aldwin Wolfling. Device. Or, a fish naiant sable and a base indented azure.


Prior rulings notwithstanding, there is no difference between naiant and naiant "embowed": the naiant posture often includes a slight embowment. This conflicts with Hayman (Rietstap), Or, a fish naiant sable. 07/92

Alec Tristan d'Avignon. Name and device. Azure, in saltire a lute and a sword within a bordure argent.


No documentation has been presented to show Alec as a period diminutive of Alexander; indeed, such evidence as exists suggests it to be a purely modern diminutive. Without evidence of period use, we cannot register Alec. The submitter has disallowed any changes to his name.


The lute is characterized by its angled pegbox; the instrument drawn here is not a lute. More important, it's been drawn in trian aspect, which has been grounds for return ere now: v. Tomas Luis Rodrigues de Segovia, LoAR of Oct 91. This must be returned for redrawing, and (if he intends to use this long-necked instrument, instead of a lute) some documentation for the charge. 12/92

Alessandra Rodríguez de León. Device. Argent, a ram's head cabossed proper, a bordure purpure.


The "ram's head proper" was colored argent, which has zero contrast on an argent field. When she resubmits, please instruct the submitter to draw the bordure much wider. 10/92

Alex of Kintail. Device. Per pale sable and Or, a two-headed double-queued eagle-winged wyvern displayed counterchanged.


The device conflicts with Mikhail Reubenovic Kopaczewski (SCA): Per pale sable and Or, a double headed eagle displayed counterchanged, a chief embattled gules. The changes to the wyvern (notably, the use of eagle's wings) prevent finding difference between the primary charges, leaving only one CD for the addition of the chief. 05/93

Alexander Fortescue. Device. Quarterly purpure and Or, a chain bendwise argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Chetner (Rietstap): De gueules à une chaîne de trois chaînons d'argent, posée en bande (Gules, a chain of three links bendwise argent). There's a single CD, for the field. 06/93

Alexander Godfrey. Badge. Sable, a cross formy sable fimbriated, within and conjoined to an annulet, all within a bordure embattled Or charged with crosses formy sable.


The badge suffers from serious problems of identifiability. The central cross was blazoned on the LOI as on a cross formy ... Or, a cross formy sable; but the emblazon showed the corners of the Or 'cross' merging. A more accurate blazon would be a cross form sable fimbriated Or, which is at best a borderline practice. Conjoined to the annulet, it loses what little identifiability it still had.


The effect of the crosses on the embattled bordure depends on exact placement of each cross on a crenellation. As a test, we gave the blazon to an experienced heraldic artist, asking her to reproduce the emblazon; and we gave the emblazon to an experienced herald, asking him for the blazon. Neither one could reproduce the submitted form.


This is being returned for violation of Rule VIII.3, Armorial Identifiability, and VIII.4.d, Modern Style. 09/92

Alexander of Kiev. Name.


The name conflicts with Alexander, Grand-Duke of Kiev (1220-1263), better known as Alexander Nevsky. He is cited in several general references (e.g. Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.29), so is important enough to protect. The submitter's armory was registered under the holding name Carl of Carolingia. 05/93

Alexandra de la Mer Verte.Badge resubmission. Argent, on a pale wavy azure between two Latin crosses botonny vert, in pale a Latin cross botonny and two sea-anchors in saltire Or.


The design suffers from severe problems of identifiability. The worst problem was the "sea-anchors", which did not resemble any anchor we were able to document. For one thing, there was no place to attach the line or chain from the boat. The OED does mention sea-anchors, but dates them only from the 17th Century; and the term refers to a float with a sail, nothing like the charges shown here. We need some documentation for the charge as depicted.


Also, the wavy lines on the pale need to be drawn much deeper. Please instruct the submitter, should she resubmit with this motif. 8/93

Alexandra de la Mer Verte.Device resubmission. Or, on a bend embattled-counterembattled vert between a mortar and pestle and an inkwell with quill pen issuant sable, three escallops inverted palewise argent.


There are several problems with the submission. First, the embattled line of the bend is drawn far too shallow on the full-sized emblazon to be seen from any distance. (There also seems to be a "frequency shift" in the crenellations: the center of the bend would be better blazoned bretessed. It counts for no difference, but it's awkward nonetheless.)


Second, this is at the extreme of acceptable complexity, with four tinctures and five types of charge, even counting the mortar & pestle as a single charge. (I don't make that allowance for the pen and inkwell; they are not usually found as a unit in armorial art, as the mortar & pestle are.) Combined with the complex line on the bend, this becomes unacceptable.


Finally, unlike the previous submission, which used a documented period form of inkpot, the current submission uses what appears to be an 18th Century form. We'd like some documentation of its use in period before we register it. 04/93

Alexandra of Raderschloss. Name and device. Quarterly azure and vert, a sea-horse argent.


No documentation was provided for either Rader or Raderschloss, and we couldn't find it in our sources. We need some evidence of its use in period before we can register it. The device conflicts with Rowan of Windtree Tower (SCA): Per saltire sable and vert, a sea horse erect argent. There's a single CD, for the field. 10/92

Alexandria of Mazzara. Badge. (fieldless) In bend sinister a bow and a shepherd's crook bendwise, fretted with an arrow bendwise sinister inverted proper.


Technically, the design uses a single group of three dissimilar charges, in violation of Rule VIII.1.a. Even stipulating that a bow and arrow could be considered a single charge (in the same way a mortar and pestle, or a penner and inkhorn, might be), the design uses an excessive amount of proper coloration, disallowed per VIII.4.c. Finally, the arrow is drawn in an unidentifiable style, with miniscule fletching and points. This must be returned for redesign and redrawing. 10/92

Alicia Kyra Avelin. Household badge for Caer Ariandan. (fieldless) A flame sable voided argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Aonghais Dubh MacTarbh (SCA): Argent, a flame sable voided Or. Voiding can be considered equivalent to adding a tertiary charge; Alicia's submission can be equally well reblazoned On a flame sable another argent, and Aonghais's badge reblazoned On a flame sable another Or. By those blazons, the conflict is clearer: Rule X.4.j does not grant a CD for change of tertiary tincture alone. 12/92

Alistair of Avalon. Device resubmission. Azure, a bear's head affronty erased erminois within a mascle of swords proper.


The submitter has changed the bear's head in his device from Or to erminois, to avoid the conflict from his previous submission. Unfortunately, the ermine spots render the bear's head totally unrecognizable. A test of every person at the Laurel meeting (including Laurel staff, spouses of staff, and herald-symps) failed to find one who could identify the bear's head; guesses ranged from "lion's face" to "trilobite". In general, beasts and beast parts should not be of an ermine fur, unless the silhouette is distinctive (as with a lion rampant). The bear's head cabossed does not meet that criterion, and is unidentifiable when erminois. He might consider, say, a bear's head per pale Or and argent. 07/92

Alistrina de Mann. Device. Pean, a wolf sejant erect guardant within a bordure engrailed argent.


Device returned for two reasons. First, the engrailing is drawn far too shallowly to be seen at a distance. Second, the device conflicts with Pourton (Papworth 114), Sable, a greyhound rampant within a bordure engrailed argent, with only one CD for the field. We grant no difference between sejant erect and rampant. 10/93

Allen of Moffat. Device resubmission. Per chevron Or and azure, a pall inverted between three shamrocks counterchanged.


Though blazoned as "new" on the LOI, this is in fact a resubmission. The previous submission (Per chevron inverted sable and Or, a pall counterchanged Or and gules between in chief a bezant charged with a cross formy fitchy at the foot, and in base two crosses formy fitchy at the foot gules, each within an annulet sable) was returned Sept 83 for over-complexity and non-period style. Laurel suggested at the time that the submitter "Please use a simple pall gules", implying that the counterchanging of the pall over the field division was part of the non-period style.


This resubmission, though greatly simplified, still has a pall (this time inverted) counterchanged over a Per chevron field division. We have in the past registered solidly-tinctured palls inverted over Per chevron divisions (or the same motif inverted); the pall is then understood to overlie the line of the field. The same understanding cannot apply when the pall is counterchanged: the line of the field could legally be under the center of the pall, under one of its edges, or even extending beyond the pall on the other side.


Moreover, the visual effect is that of a pall inverted (the lower limbs narrower than that in chief) and a point pointed azure, all on an Or field. The visual confusion, combined with the problems of reproducibility, combine to make this motif unacceptable.


We offer the same suggestion as in his previous return: he might try making the pall gules (assuming no conflicts, of course). 06/93

Alysandria of the Fosse Way. Device. Gules, an ounce rampant Or spotted of diverse tinctures, on a chief Or three roses gules.


This has several conflicts, of which the arms of Gillow are typical (Papworth 106): Gules, a lion rampant Or, on a chief of the last three fleurs-de-lis of the first. There's a CD for the changes to the tertiary charge group. The creature is not a panther, as blazoned on the LOI (for it isn't incensed of flame), but an ounce or maneless lion. As such, it gets no difference from a standard lion; and its spots here count for no more than the spots on any other spotted cat (e.g. a natural leopard). If she resubmits with a genuine panther, charged with large roundels -- better yet, with a Continental panther -- it should be clear of these conflicts. 03/93

Amabel d'Avignon. Device. Per pale sable and argent, on a heart gules a four-leaved shamrock slipped Or.


This conflicts with Galin Flamebeard, reblazoned elsewhere on this LoAR: Paly sable and Or, on a heart gules a flame Or charged with a fist affronty sable. There's a CD for the field, but for a tertiary on a charge such as a heart, we grant no difference for type alone, per Rule X.4.j.ii. Quaternary charges (e.g. the fist on Galin's device) count for no difference at all. 01/93

Amanda of Coldcastle. Device. Sable, a gurges couped in base, a bordure Or.


It has previously been ruled (LoAR of Oct 90) that the gurges may not be couped: "Whirlpools or gurges are used as a single, throughout charge on a field." This must be returned; if she resubmits with a standard throughout gurges, this will be a striking device. 7/93

Anastasia dello Scudo Rosso. Device. Gules, on a bend sinister between a sun and a winged lion couchant guardant, wings addorsed, maintaining an open book Or, three roses gules.


This conflicts with Anastasia Ivanovna (SCA): Gules, on a bend sinister between two candles enflamed Or, three mullets of six points gules. There's a CD for type of secondary; but because the secondaries are not identical, X.4.j.ii doesn't apply to the tertiaries. The single tertiary change (of type), is not enough for the second needed CD.


The lion of St. Mark is characterized by a halo, as well as wings; it is usually, but not invariably, also shown with a book. (Vinycombe, Fictitious and Symbolic Creatures in Art, with special reference to their use in British heraldry, 1906, pp.53-55.) The monster in this submission is simply a winged lion, more literate than most. 09/92

Anastasia Germain. Name and device. Per fess engrailed gules and Or, a phoenix and a hulk counterchanged.


The engrailed line is drawn far too small to be visible at any distance. Complex lines should be drawn in a bold heraldic manner, so they can be recognized, per Rules VII.7.a and VIII.3. This must be returned for redrawing.


A hulk is a boat's hull, without sails, mast, or oars ( Franklyn & Tanner 179). 10/92

Ander Vargskinn. Device. Argent, two herons statant counter-statant in saltire, and a bordure flory azure.


This is not really drawn in a period style. The ripples around the (couped) legs of the herons, and the Art Deco bordure that doesn't follow the line of the shield, combine to warrant a return for redrawing. 09/92

Anderewe Fouchier of the White Dove. Device. Per chevron Or and sable, two wood planes in chevron and a bear dormant contourny counterchanged.


As has been noted in the past, the dormant posture should be used cautiously, as it all too often obscures the beast's head, tail and feet, rendering it unidentifiable. That's the case here: the bear is indistinguishable from a "meatloaf". This must be returned for redrawing.


When he resubmits, please instruct the submitter to supply documentation for the wood plane. As his submission would be the defining instance of the charge, we need some evidence of this form in period. My quick check of a handy source (Singer et al, A History of Technology, vol.II, pp.230-231 and plate 30-A) showed period planes rather more like the modern form than the form shown here. 03/93

Andras Truemark. Name and device. Per chevron embattled gules and Or, three pheons inverted Or and a bear passant sable.


The byname doesn't seem to be validly derived. The LOI attempted to derive Truemark as a toponymic, from OE trêow-mearc "tree boundary". However, the examples in Ekwall's Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place Names suggest that Trowmark or Tremark would be more likely evolutions of such a construction. Nor does the submitter's intended meaning of "true to the [archery] mark" appear to be correct, for two reasons. First, I could find no citations of true to the mark as a period idiom, for archery or anything else. Second, the submitted construction could only have derived from trêowe-mearc "faithful [archery] target". In other words, instead of the submitter always hitting the target, the submitter would always be the target -- which is far enough from his intent that I'd hesitate to register the name without consulting with him first.


The submitter did not permit any changes, so we could neither alter the submitted spelling nor form a holding name. The device must therefore be returned as well. The miniscule size of the embattled line might have necessitated a return in any event; should he resubmit with this motif, please be sure he draws the embattlements larger. 8/93

Aneala, Barony of. Badge. Per fess argent and azure, a double-headed demi-swan displayed sable, conjoined with a demi-sun inverted argent.


The conjoining of the demi-charges tends to render both unidentfiable; in particular, most of the commenters found it difficult to recognize the sun. This must be returned for redesign. 01/93

Angela Sara María Díaz de Valdés. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A finger ring Or set with an emerald vert, overall a galleon sable, sails gules.


Her previous submission, with six emeralds set around the ring's circumference, was returned Oct 91 for a non-period charge. In this resubmission, she has used a period form of gemmed-ring -- but has now drawn the galleon so large as to completely obscure it, rendering it once again unidentifiable. She might consider having the ship entirely within the ring, conjoined to its inner edge. 08/92

Angeline of the Grove. Badge. Azure, a ferret salient to sinister argent.


This conflicts with Aleksandr Bogoliubskii (SCA): Gyronny vert and Or, a ferret statant bendwise sinister to sinister argent. There's a single CD, for the field; the postures are equivalent. 10/92

Angus Murdoch Stewart. Device. Argent, a cow statant erect purpure within a bordure gules.


The bordure on the submission forms (unlike that on the LOI's miniature emblazon) is far too narrow to register. We're normally content to instruct a client to "draw the bordure wider henceforth" -- but this bordure is too narrow for us to do so in good conscience. If this is resubmitted with a correctly emblazoned bordure, it should be acceptable. 06/93

Angus Sinclair. Badge. (fieldless) On a sun Or eclipsed sable, an anchor Or.


The badge has two problems, either of which is sufficient for return. The first is the use of quaternary charges, or charges entirely on tertiaries. A sun eclipsed is considered equivalent to a sun charged with a roundel; the two are interchangeable blazons, and yield the same emblazon. The anchor atop the roundel is therefore a quaternary charge, forbidden per Rule VIII.1.c.ii.


The other problem is conflict. The Rules grant no difference whatsoever for the addition, removal, or changes to quaternary charges. This therefore conflicts with the device of Kourost Bernard of the East Woods (SCA), Sable, a sun eclipsed Or [i.e. a sun Or eclipsed sable]. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for the anchor.


It also conflicts with the device of Stefan of Seawood (SCA), Azure, upon a sun Or an eagle displayed sable. Again, there's a CD for fieldlessness, but since the sun is not a simple geometric charge, Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply; there is no difference for type only of the tertiary charge, and again no difference for the quaternary charge. 8/93

Ania Dahlbergh. Device. Argent, a goblet sable with ribbons issuant from its mouth gules, within an orle of grapevine proper.


This conflicts with Cleuere (Papworth 676), Argent, a cup covered sable. There's a CD for the vine, but the "maintained" ribbons count for no difference. 03/93

Anna de Battista. Device. Or, a garden rosebud gules, slipped and leaved vert within a bordure flory gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Rosenmann (Rietstap): Or, a rose gules. There's a CD for the bordure, but no difference for garden rose(bud) vs. heraldic rose, and we've yet seen no evidence that period heralds granted difference for slipping and leaving. 05/93

Anna Dimitriova Belokon. Name and device. Gyronny azure and Or, a mullet of eight points counterchanged.


This conflicts with the Ansteorran Chronicler's seal (SCA): A mullet of five greater and five lesser points distilling gouts. While the five lesser points are "lesser", they are still points; Ansteorra's mullet is technically of ten points, from which we grant no difference from a mullet of eight points. As Ansteorra's seal is tinctureless, there is a single CD for all the changes of tincture -- including lines of partition.


The name for this submission was stated to be on the East Kingdom LOI of 22 June 1992. It was not; nor have we received forms, documentation, or payment for it. We cannot accept the device without a registerable name. 11/92

Anna Tanner. Device. Per chevron sable and vert, two mullets and a crescent argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Clerc (Rietstap): D'azur à deux étoiles (5) d'argent en chef et un croissant du même en pointe (Azure, two mullets [of five points] and a crescent argent). There's a single CD, for the field. 03/93

Anne Chavelle of Silver Oak. Badge. (fieldless) Four oak leaves in cross vert, fructed Or.


Visual conflict with the badge of Tatjana vom Hülst (formerly Tatjana von Adlerheim): (fieldless) Four holly leaves conjoined in cross vert, fructed with four berries gules. We have hitherto granted a CD for type of a single leaf: oak leaf vs. maple leaf (Karl the Meek and Mild), or oak leaf vs. elm leaf (Siobhan O Riordain). But this is offset here by the identical motifs: the arrangement and conjoining in cross add to the visual similarity. 07/92

Anne Elaina of River's Bend. Device. Argent, three bars wavy and on a chief azure, two hawks displayed Or.


This conflicts with the Herne Bay Urban District Council (Public Heraldry, p.64): Barry wavy of six argent and azure, on a chief azure, a heron Or between two crosses formy fitchee argent. There is only one CD for the changes to the tertiaries. We grant no difference between argent, three bars wavy azure and barry wavy argent and azure.


Also, if we consider argent, three bars wavy azure to be interchangeable with barry wavy azure and argent, the device conflicts with Weeks (Papworth 568), Paly of eight Or and gules, on a chief azure three eagles displayed double-headed of the first, with one CD for the change to the "field". There is nothing for the changes to the tertiaries. 10/93

Anne of Carthew. Device. Azure, a goblet Or, on a chief argent three roses gules.


This technically conflicts with the arms of Lawrie, cited in the LOI (Papworth 676): Azure, a cup Or with four laurel branches issuant argent, the center ones orlewise, on a chief of the third a lion passant gules between two mullets of the first. The blazons of similar designs in Lawrie/Laurie armory convince us that the laurel branches are not "maintained" charges but significant secondary charges; their removal is worth a CD. However, we couldn't see giving the second needed CD for the changes to the tertiaries on the chief.


Between this submission and Lawrie, there have been changes to type of all three charges on the chief, and to tincture of two of them. Since Lawrie's armory is not simple, Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply; change of type alone of the tertiaries isn't worth a CD. Rule X.4.j.i states that "Generally, such changes must affect the whole group of [tertiary] charges to be considered visually significant." [Emphasis mine.] The word "generally" gives us some leeway, true, but the cases where that leeway can be exercised are few.


It has been ruled (LoAR cover letter of 16 Oct 90) that "in certain particularly simple cases, changes to type or number plus change of tincture of one-half of tertiary charge(s) will be sufficient difference for a CVD." The defining case closest to the current submission was that of Éibhleann O'Ceileachair, Sept 90: her submission of Azure, a demi-sun issuant from base Or, on a chief argent three shamrocks vert was deemed clear of the Barony of Aneala, Azure, a demi-sun issuant from chief Or, on a chief argent a laurel wreath vert between two swan's heads and necks erased respectant sable. That case, and the case of Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme on the same LoAR, set the standard for "certain particularly simple cases": all the armories considered had at most a single charge beneath the chief. While the client's submission meets that standard, the arms of Lawrie do not; Lawrie has twisty branches, half of which form an orle. I therefore cannot consider this a simple case, and so cannot grant the needed CD for the tertiary changes.


To summarize: between this submission and the arms of Lawrie, there's a CD for the secondary charges (the laurel branches); but Lawrie's armory is too complex to allow us to get another CD for the changes to the tertiaries. This must be returned, with regrets. 7/93

Anne Sinclair. Per bend embattled argent and azure, two dolphins naiant counterchanged.


Conflicts with Ríoghnach MacLeod: Per bend argent and azure, two dolphins naiant counterchanged (SCA, July 93). There is only one CD for the line of partition. 9/93

Anne-Marie d'Ailleurs. Device. Azure, three ducks passant in fess between two bars wavy argent.


The name was returned on the LoAR of Oct 92, and the submitter did not permit us to form a holding name. The device submission must therefore be returned as well.


A check of the emblazon showed the ducks to be the primary charges in this case; the bars are secondaries, having been moved far enough to chief and base to no longer dominate the design. Rule X.2 thus brings this clear of the arms of Brooksbank ( Papworth 16), Azure, two bars wavy argent. 04/93

Anne-Marie d'Ailleurs. Name.


The French byname literally means "of Elsewhere", which seems highly improbable as a period locative. (Its more common idiomatic meaning is "on the other hand", which makes even less sense.) We have previously returned names whose locatives were this unspecific: v. Dughal MacDonnel of Kennaquhair ("of Know-Not-Where"), LoAR of Oct 91. This must be returned as well. The submitter disallowed any changes to her name. 10/92

Annys de Vernun of Kettering. Badge. (fieldless) An annulet wreathed Or and gules.


Conflicts with the badge of King James of Scotland: (tinctureless) An annulet (Fox Davies' Heraldic Badges), Abe: Dark an annulet light (Hawley's Mon, p.85), and with Lonsdale: Gyronny of eight gules and Or, an annulet counterchanged (Papworth, p.4). There is only one CD for the fieldless nature of this submission. In the first two conflicts, there is no difference granted for charge tincture versus tinctureless badges. In the third conflict, the tincture of the a nnulet is essentially the same, multiple segments of alternating gules and Or. 9/93

Ansteorra, Kingdom of. Title for Aubergine Pursuivant.


The earliest citations for aubergine "eggplant" are from 1750 (in French) and 1794 (in English). We need evidence of period usage before the word can be registered as an heraldic title. 06/93

Antonietta Zampa del Gatto. Name change to Tandre Catspaw.


The evidence does not support Catspaw, in that spelling, as a period English term. The OED cites the idiom cat's paw to 1657, outside our 50-year "grey area" for documentation, and cat's-paw to 1817. It does not cite catspaw at all.


This may seem petty and pharasaic -- especially since her currently registered byname zampa del gatto means "paw of the cat", and has the same idiomatic meaning in Italian that cat's-paw has in English. But the story that inspired the idiom came from Italy c.1510; zampa del gatto appears to be a period idiom for that tongue. Without similarly good evidence that catspaw (in any spelling) is period for English, we cannot accept it -- certainly not in the very modern spelling submitted here. This is not pettiness, but our best effort at fairness and consistency.


The submitter has disallowed any changes to her name whatsoever, so we must return this. You might suggest she try Cat's Foot, an earlier form of the idiom that can be argued to 1623, and which does date to period in a different meaning. 07/92

Aonghus Lochlainn of Loch Fyne. Device. Pily bendy sinister argent and vert.


Considered as a field-only device with a simple division (i.e., one without a complex line), this conflicts with several armories: Hammerton (Papworth 1035), Quarterly argent and vert; Harthell (Papworth 53), Barry of six argent and vert; Langley (Papworth 1018), Paly of six vert and argent; Lawson (Papworth 1018), Paly of six argent and vert, and Lillington (Papworth 371), Checky argent and vert. In each case there's a single CD, for the field division; Rule X.4.a.ii requires two changes to field-only armory.


If the field is considered as an exaggerated Per bend indented (sometimes misblazoned dancetty), the device clears the above conflicts, but new conflicts are then introduced: Ferne (Papworth 182), Per bend dancetty argent and gules; Kendall (Papworth 182), Per bend dancetty argent and sable; and Markington (Papworth 182), Per bend indented sable and argent. In each case, there's a CD for tincture, but not for the field division or its complex line. Either way, this must be returned. 06/93

Aquila Blackmore. Device resubmission. Argent vêtu ployé gules, a mullet sable within a bordure argent.


This conflicts with a badge of the Luftwaffe, quoted from the Combined Ordinary II, p.162: Gules, on a lozenge ploye argent the number 1 headed of an eagle and between two wings gules, within a bordure argent. There's one CD for the change of tertiary charge. We regret this conflict wasn't cited in his previous submission, but Combo II was not yet published then. 12/92

Arabella Moira of Heatherhill. Device. Vert, a stag trippant and on a chief embattled argent, three roses purpure.


This conflicts with the device of Brian Angus McDonald (SCA): Azure, a stag passant maintaining a gonfannon and on a chief embattled argent, three roses azure. There's a CD for the field, but no difference for the maintained charge, or for changes to only the tincture of the tertiaries. 7/93

Ard Thir, Shire of. Name.


This conflicts with the Kingdom of An Tir (SCA). Per Rule V.2, the addition of the adjective ard "high" is not enough to bring it clear. Nor can the definite article an in An Tir be considered an adjective; even though the Kingdom name is never used without the article, it's still an article, not an adjective. (A similar example in modern English might be South Bronx vs. The Bronx.)


Since Ard Thir means "high land", it also conflicts with the Scottish Highlands; Árd-Thir is their name for the region, in their own tongue. 10/92

Arianna Gunnarsdottir. Name.


The Italian given name does not seem compatible with the Old Norse patronymic. Per Rule III.2, we need evidence of period Old Norse/Italian interaction before we can register this name. 09/92

Aric Thomas Percy Raven. Name and device. Quarterly Or and lozengy azure and Or, in bend two ravens contourny sable.


The use of four elements in an English name is anomalous (a "weirdness"), costing the submitter the benefit of the doubt (LoAR of July 92, p.18); it's permissible only if there are no other problems with the name. In this case, the use of Aric is a problem; it is not directly attested (although similar names, such as Arich and Airic, are), and it appears to date from three centuries earlier than the rest of the name. The accumulated weirdnesses are too much to register; we suggest he delete one of the names.


After much soul-searching, I must agree with the commenters who saw an appearance of marshalling in the device. Rule XI.3.b states that quarterly may be used only "when no single portion of the field [appears] to be an independent piece of armory." In general, complexity in any of the quarters makes it look like independent armory; for example, XI.3.b explicitly cites the use of multiple charges in a quarter as unacceptable. The motif Quarterly X and Y, in bend two [charges] is allowable when the uncharged quarters are plain tinctures; we don't protect plain tinctures. But when the uncharged quarters are complex fields, we lose that rationale; and the complexity then begins to make it look like an independent coat. This, beneath all the subtext, is exactly what XI.3.b is meant to prevent.


This must be returned for the appearance of quartered armory. He might consider using plain tinctures in all four quarters, or using a charge overall. 10/92

Ariel de Courtenay. Device. Per pall argent, gules, and paly argent and sable, in chief a thistle proper.


This conflicts with the Royal badge of James III of Scotland (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.117): A thistle proper. There is a single CD, for fieldlessness; placement on the field cannot be counted against a fieldless badge. 09/92

Arinwald Rotstein. Device. Vair, a tower and on a chief dovetailed gules, three eagles displayed Or.


The dovetailing on the chief is drawn far too small to be identifiable from any distance. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 03/93

Arlys of Gordon. Name resubmission.


The previous submission, Arlyss o Gordon, was returned on the LoAR of July 86 for using a surname as a given name, and for the appearance of an incorrect patronymic. The submitter has solved the second problem by substituting of for o -- though we note that o and o' are valid period forms of of and would now be acceptable. (See the registration of James o' Gordon, elsewhere on this LoAR.) The first problem, however, remains. The argument in the LoI does not support deriving Arlys from Arlindis. The case is not parallel to the derivation of Alice from Adalheidis. In the name Arlindis, -lind- is a complete theme; you cannot simply eliminate part of that theme. Arlindis is more likely to have evolved into Ariza or Arys, dropping the them altogether. Given that Arlys, Arliss is documented as a surname, we need better justification before it can be registered as a given name. Lord Palimpsest has shown that Arliza would be a valid given name, but such a change would exceed the submitter's permitted alternatives. You might see if she'll accept Arliza. 10/93

Armand le Rouge. Device. Gules, two escallops argent and a fleece Or.


Conflicts with William de Acre (Papworth 681), Gules three escallops argent. There is a single CD, for the cumulative changes to the charge in base. 9/93

Arnbiørn Bassi Dansson. Device. Per fess azure and vert, a bear statant erect affronty, sinister forepaw upraised Or.


This conflicts with the Barony of Adiantum's badge for the Collar and Chain Award (SCA), Gules, a two-headed bear statant erect affronty, forelegs raised, heads addorsed Or collared and chained sable. There's a CD for the field, but nothing for the number of heads, the "maintained" chain, or the slight difference in posture. 10/93

Havelward of Bourne. Name.


We have no documentation for the use of Havelward as a given name. We need evidence of the transition from the documented Haylwardus to the submitted Havelward before we can accept the name as given. The armory is registered under the holding name Howard of Bright Hills. 10/93

Artemisia, Principality of. Badge resubmission for the Order of the Golden Feather. (fieldless) A feather palewise Or surmounted by a gryphon's head erased sable.


Fieldless badges may no longer use overall charges, except in cases where the overlap area is small; this is usually restricted to long, skinny charges such as a sword (LoAR cover letter of 15 Jan 93). As drawn, the feather in this badge doesn't meet that standard. 05/93

Artemisia, Principality of. Badge resubmission for the Order of the Gryphon's Talon. (fieldless) A "talon" palewise sable issuant to base from a "garb of feathers" argent.


Neither the "talon" nor the "garb of feathers" was identifiable by any of the commenters, or by anyone at Laurel's meeting. Possible reblazons included a radish, a hot pepper, a badminton shuttlecock, and a featherduster. The primary purpose of heraldry is identifiability; this must be redrawn to fulfill that purpose. (Moreover, feathers don't normally come in garbs.) 05/93

Arthur Bromere. Device. Per fess enarched sable and gules, a lion passant guardant Or maintaining a heart, in chief three broad arrows inverted argent.


Two-color fields with complex lines of division should not have charges overlying them, per Rule VIII.3. The enarched line is considered a complex line in SCA armory, though no difference is granted between it and an untreated (straight) line. If this is resubmitted with a simple per fess field, it should be acceptable style. 12/92

Ashlin d'Ypres. Name.


Ashlin does not appear to be a valid given name. Instead, it's the modern spelling of a period surname (Asshelyn) based on the given name Ascelin. We will permit modern spellings of period names (e.g. Dafydd), but we draw the line at modern spellings of surname derivations of period names, used as given names. The submitter might consider resubmitting as Ascelin. 04/93

Asne Whitewolf. Badge. (fieldless) A wolf sejant argent.


This conflicts with the arms of de Wolf (Woodward 228): Vert, a wolf sejant argent. There's a single CD, for fieldlessness. 7/93

Asne Whitewolf. Device. Vert, a wolf sejant argent and a bordure dovetailed Or.


This conflicts with the arms of de Wolf (Woodward 228): Vert, a wolf sejant argent. There's a single CD, for the bordure. 05/93

Astrid Esbjörnsdotter. Device. Per bend sinister Or and azure, a quill pen issuant from an ink bottle vert and a rose argent.


The device has a single group of three dissimilar charges, all of equal visual weight. This is disallowed, per Rule VIII.1.a. 05/93

Astrid Radulfsdottir. Household name for House von Neunkirchen.


This conflicts with the city of Neunkirchen, in the Saar region between France and Germany. By our standards, the city is important enough to protect: it's a center for the European iron industry, and appears in at least two general references (New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.III, p.2919; 1911 Encyclopedia Brittanica, vol.XIX, p.426). The fact that it is a "generically formed name" does not detract from its importance: Iceland is a generically formed name, too. Nor does the fact that several other towns share the same name reduce the importance of this one. Neunkirchen meets the criteria for protection under the Administrative Guidelines; this must therefore be returned. 08/92

Atenveldt, Kingdom of. Name and badge for the Order of the Radiant Rose of Atenveldt. Azure, on a sun Or a rose purpure, a bordure embattled Or.


The name conflicts with the SCA's Order of the Rose. Our general policy is that the addition of an adjective plus the territorial branch name is sufficient difference between names -- that is, a hypothetical Order of the White Star of the Middle would not conflict with France's Order of the Star. But we make an exception for the SCA Orders of Peerage, due to their universal application and importance within the Society. We suggest choosing some other noun for the order's name.


The badge conflicts with the device of Tatiana of the Swans (SCA), Azure, on a sun Or, a mullet of four points purpure charged with a swan naiant argent. There's a CD for the bordure, but per Rule X.4.j.ii, type alone of tertiary charge is not worth a CD on a complex primary such as a sun; and the quaternary charge (the swan on Tatiana's device) isn't considered a difference in SCA armory. 05/93

August Kroll. Device. Argent maily sable, on a chief azure an open scroll fesswise argent charged with two quill pens fesswise sable.


This was blazoned on the LOI as Per fess azure, and argent maily sable, in chief on an open scroll fesswise argent two quill pens fesswise sable. However, the full emblazon didn't quite show a Per fess division, but rather a charged chief. The quill pens are therefore quaternary charges, which are disallowed per Rule VIII.1.c.ii.


The distinction between, say, Argent, a chief gules and Per fess gules and argent was not often observed in early heraldry; indeed, the first examples of Per-fess emblazons were blazoned a chief. (See Wagner's Historic Heraldry of Britain, plate II, for such an example.) However, the distinction was observed by the mid-15th Century, and is observed in the SCA. This may make it easier for us to avoid conflict, but it also requires us to insist on correct emblazons. If this is resubmitted with an undoubted Per fess field, there should be no stylistic problems. 09/92

Aurelia du Coeur Sincère. Device. Per pale gules and argent, a goblet bendwise distilling a gout, within a bordure "nebuly" counterchanged.


The nebuly line of partition is unidentifiable on the emblazon; it more strongly resembles a potenty line with the corners rounded off. This must be returned for redrawing.


If she resubmits with this motif, also instruct her to draw the gout larger. Even as a "maintained" charge, it should be drawn large enough to see. 8/93

Aurora Ashland of Woolhaven. Device. Vert semy of rams statant argent armed Or, on a sinister canton Or an ash tree proper.


Charged cantons may not be used except in the case of augmentations of arms. This prohibition dates from at least 28 Dec 82 and is still in force. This must be returned, per Rule XI.1.


The 1984 Rules for Submission did not permit semy charges to be fimbriated, proper, or of divided tinctures (IX.2). While that specific clause is not found in the current Rules, those usages remain poor style, and in extreme cases may be grounds for return under Rule VIII.3. The submitter would be well advised to use single-tinctured rams in her semy, when she resubmits. 01/93

Aurora Gillybary. Device. Purpure semy of compass stars, a moon in her plentitude argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Baillie de Walstoun (Rietstap): Azure, a moon in her plenitude between nine mullets of eight points, rays adorned at the angles, three, two, three and one argent. There's a CD for the field, but no difference for type of mullets -- and Baillie's mullets are negligibly different from a semy. 03/93

Azaleja Imrah Antoniades. Name.


Azaleja is a common noun, Serbo-Croatian for the azalea flower. Its use as a given name is based on Bosanac's Prosvjetin Imenoslov, which is apparently a Serbo-Croatian baby-name book (on a par with most of its American counterparts). We need evidence of the flower's use as a period given name before we can register this.

Balian de Brionne. Badge. (fieldless) On a flame Or a salamander gules.


This is a technical conflict with the arms of William of Sark (SCA): Sable, a flame proper. There's a CD for fieldlessness. Since a flame proper is, on a dark field, equivalent to on a flame Or another gules, the only other change is to type of tertiary charge -- which on a complex primary is worth no difference, per Rule X.4.j.ii.


Possible conflict was also cited with the badge of Dundas (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.96): (fieldless) A salamander proper. Technically speaking, the medieval heraldic salamander would have been a reptile with spurts of flame, or at most lying on a bed of flame; in any event, the reptile would have been the primary charge. Here, the flame is the primary charge, and the salamander a tertiary. We might still have called a visual conflict, all other things being equal, had we been able to ascertain the tincture of a salamander "proper". We still aren't sure what that might be, but it doesn't seem to have been gules: Franklyn & Tanner, for instance, state that the salamander is "Generally argent or Or, and occasionally vert." In any event, we can give the submitter the benefit of the doubt on this conflict -- as the other one cited renders it moot. 7/93

Balian de Brionne. Badge. (fieldless) A spearhead azure surmounted by a bee Or.


The bee, as drawn, is halfway between a true overall charge (which would significantly overlap the edges of the spearhead) and a tertiary charge (which would lie entirely on the spearhead). Barely-overall charges were disallowed on the LoAR of 17 June 83. We suggest he resubmit this with the bee as a tertiary charge. 10/92

Balin an Claidheamh. Device. Or, a double-bitted axe sable, its handle grasped by a hand gules, between flaunches azure.


This conflicts with the badge of Ulric von Ravensway (SCA), Or, a double-bitted bearded axe sable. There's a CD for the addition of the flaunches; but the hand is too minor a detail to be worth the second needed CD. (Visually it's equivalent to a maintained charge -- but we can't really call it that, since the hand grasps the axe, not the other way around. However, its visual weight is certainly too small to be worth any difference here.) 06/93

Balin Catherwood. Device. Gules, a trillium blossom and a chief invected argent, overall a label sable.


The submitted blazon had the label on the chief. In fact it is not: it is overall, lying over the chief and the field. Overall charges are required to have good contrast with the field, not the underlying charge. Additionally, the points of the label tended to obscure the chief's line of division.


If he resubmits with the label entirely on the chief, it should be acceptable. 07/92

Balthasar of Eastwick. Name and device. Per bend sinister Or and azure, a wingless dragon displayed and facing sinister sable.


The displayed posture is not applicable to non-winged creatures, just as rampant is no longer applicable to birds (LoAR of May 91). No other blazon adequately describes this posture (although if the dragon's back were to the viewer, instead of its belly, it might be tergiant).


Moreover, since the dragon's posture (however blazoned) is indistinguishable from tergiant, this conflicts with the badge of the Barony of Bhakail (SCA): Or, a natural salamander tergiant sable. There's a CD for the field, but putting the dragon in this posture greatly reduces any difference to be granted for type of reptile. 03/93

Balthazar fitz Gryphon. Device. Azure chapé ployé, a griffin segreant contourny argent.


This conflicts with the device of Tnek the Ainissestor (SCA): Per bend sinister sable and gules, a griffin segreant to sinister argent. There's a single CD, for the field. 06/93

Barbara ni Sheaghdha of Tir Chonall. Device. Per chevron Or crusily botonny and azure, in base a cross botonny Or.


The use of a charge of the same type as a semy on the shield has previously been ruled unacceptable. "The most serious [stylistic problem] is the fact that a single secondary charge is placed on a field strewn with the same charge (in the same tincture!). Such a differentiation is not period style..." (AMoE, LoAR 2/25/90, p. 19) This was extended by Master Dau'd to include a charge of a different tincture from the semy. (LoAR 9/90, p. 16). 9/93

Beatrice Celestine of Normandie. Device. Argent, a winged demi-boar displayed facing sinister sable, issuant from and grasping an open book gules.


This conflicts with Wulfred Haraldsson (SCA): Argent, in pale a wolf's head erased contourny sable and an open book gules. There's a CD for changing the type of charge in chief, but nothing for the conjoining of the charges. 7/93

Béatrix du Lac Noir. Device. Pily barry sable and argent, three feathers in fess gules.


Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 7/93

Bengta Rolfsdotter. Device. Azure, on a mullet of four points argent, a Viking longship sable.


This conflicts with the device of Yerek the Inert (SCA), Sable, a mullet of four points voided argent. This could as easily be blazoned Sable, on a mullet of four points argent another sable, and by that blazon the conflict is clearer: there's a CD for the field, but none for change of type of the tertiary charge.


It also conflicts with the badge of Astra Christiana Benedict (SCA), (tinctureless) On a mullet a cross crosslet. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for type only of tertiary charge; and we grant no difference between mullet of four points and mullet of five points.


Beornwynn the Curmudgeon. Device. Vair, a brock's head cabossed proper within a bordure sable.


The brock's head, as drawn here, is equally argent and sable. On a field equally argent and azure, there is insufficient contrast to permit ready identification. He might try another field. 07/92

Beornwynn the Curmudgeon. Device resubmission. Or goutty de sang, a brock's head caboshed proper within a bordure rayonny sable.


The bordure has "pinking-shear" rayonny. The rayonny needs to be drawn larger with wavier rays. If the submitter resubmits this design he should make it clear that the gouts are not in orle. 9/93

Berenger Fitz Gerard. Name change (from Berenger Fitz Gerald).


This correction has already been made, on the LoAR of 23 Aug 92. 10/92

Berengière Fortescue. Device resubmission. Argent, an eagle displayed purpure, on a chief wavy sable three roses argent.


On the full-sized emblazon, the waves on the chief were not as bold as those on the miniature emblazon in the LOI. Indeed, the waves were so small as to be indistinguishable from a distance. This must be returned for redrawing.


When you instruct her how to draw the chief, you might also instruct her to draw her hawk with sleek feathers, and perhaps bells and jesses (so that it won't be reblazoned an eagle). 7/93

Berley Court, Canton of. Device change. Azure, a human head contourny, wearing a jester's cap, within a laurel wreath, on a chief indented Or a humpback whale naiant to sinister vert.


As drawn, the charge on the chief is most definitely not a humpback whale; it doesn't have the characteristic dorsal fin of the humpback. Moreover, it hasn't yet been established that the humpback whale (as a distinct species) was known in period; the OED's first citation of humpback whale dates to 1725. We can't simply blazon this a whale, because the heraldic whale is a fabulous monster looking nothing like the charge drawn here; see Woodcock & Robinson's Oxford Guide to Heraldry, pp.64-65. And I hesitate to blazon it as anything else, since the submitters were adamant that their fish be a humpback whale.


This must be returned for redrawing, and (if they intend to use a humpback whale) documentation of the charge. When they resubmit, please ask them to draw the indented chief with bold indents, as on their current device. 09/92

Bernworth von der Hüp. Name.


Both the given name and the byname are insufficiently documented. While Bernward is a valid given name, we don't see how Bernworth could be a plausible variant; the final TH would more probably have been simply T. The byname Hüp is on even shakier ground: it's documented only as a protheme in some German placenames (Hüpstedt, Hüpede), with the suggestion that it might be "a water word". Its use as an independent noun, and its exact meaning, remain uncertain. We need further evidence before this name can be registered. 12/92

Big Bear of Haven. Name and device. Azure, a drawn bow fesswise, nocked of a double-bitted axe, and sustained by two bears combattant Or.


By the submitter's own documentation, neither Big nor Bere (Bear) is a period given name: big is an epithet that happens to be used at the start of a name, and bere- is documented only as a name theme, not a name in itself. If the submitter wishes an "Icelandic Viking" name, as his forms suggest, he might consider Björn Mikill af Höfn.


The device has a single group of charges, of three different types, in violation of Rule VIII.1.a. This must be returned for simplification. 09/92

Blackhawk, Shire of. Badge. Argent, in bend two hawk's gambes bendwise sinister couped sable.


This conflicts with the arms of Prime (Papworth 962): Argent, an eagle's leg erased à la quise sable armed Or. The gambes shown here are not inverted: eagle's legs, unlike lions' legs, have their claws to base by default. However, since eagle's legs à la quise are somewhat embowed, they are often depicted with a bendwise sinister slant; so we can't get a CD for posture. The only countable difference here is for the number of legs. 01/93

Blackmoor Keep, Shire of. Device. Sable, on a pale argent a tower sable, within a laurel wreath overall counterchanged, in chief two fleurs-de-lys argent.


Our general policy (LoAR of July 92, p.20), based on period practice, is that only ordinaries (or similarly simple charges, such as roundels) may be counterchanged across ordinaries. The laurel wreath is not a simple charge, and may not be counterchanged here. While we were tempted to be lenient in this case (considering the arms of the Shire's parent Kingdom contain a laurel wreath counterchanged across a pale), I decided that making an exception here would open a larger can of worms than I could contemplate with equanimity. 10/92

Blackwood, Shire of. Name.


The name was already registered on the LoAR of March 93. 7/93

Blaise de la Loire. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a sword Or, blade enflamed gules fimbriated Or, a bordure argent.


The main charge was blazoned on the LOI as a sword Or enflamed proper. However, the flames were not equally gules and Or, but almost entirely gules with Or fimbriation. Such complex fimbriation is not permitted. (I might note that, if the flame were equally gules and Or, the sword Or in its center might be too visually confusing to be registered. The submitter would be better advised to choose different colors altogether.) 10/92

Bleddyn Hawk. Device. Per bend sinister azure and gules, an opinicus statant contourny Or.


This conflicts with the badge of Nerissa Meraud de la Fontaine (SCA): Gules, a griffin passant to sinister bearing in its sinister talon a goblet Or. There's a CD for the field, but the difference between the griffin-variants is too small to be worth a second CD. The Rules specifically grant no heraldic difference for the "held" charge or slight change in posture. 8/93

Borimir Dimitrian. Device resubmission. Per pale gules and vert, a horse passant and a bordure embattled argent.


While adding the complex line to the bordure has removed the conflict of the previous return, the embattled line is not drawn in a period style: the embattlements are too small to be easily seen. Since the embattled line brings the device clear of conflict, it's important that it be seen. When the gentle resubmits, please have him draw a much thicker bordure, with more prominent embattlements. 09/92

Boris Brighthill. Device. Or, an anvil sable atop a mount invected vert, a chief enarched rayonny azure.


(The name was returned Oct 92.) There are two stylistic problems with the device. First, the chief combines two complex lines of division, which has been grounds for return ere now (LoAR of Dec 92, p.20). Second, the device has a strong appearance of landscapism, disallowed under Rule VIII.4.a. While each of these is not quite sufficiently bad enough for return -- the enarched line is one of the few that might be combined with other complex divisions, and the landscape effect is not as blatant as it could have been -- the combination of the two is enough to have this returned for non-heraldic style. Both problems might be solved by using a plain chief. 01/93

Boris Brighthill. Name.


The use of the Russian given name with the English surname violates our requirements for cultural contact, as outlined in Rule III.2. We need some evidence of period interaction between Russia and England. 10/92

Bran na Fé. . Device. Sable, a natural tiger rampant argent marked sable, an orle Or.


The device has multiple conflicts, such as the arms of Verdon (Chesshyre and Woodcock 138), Sable, a lion argent, and Wasteneys (Chesshyre and Woodcock 179), Sable, a lion queue-forchy argent. In each case, there's a CD for the addition of the orle, but no heraldic difference between big cats, nor for the artistic markings. 10/93

Brand the Black. Device. Checky sable and Or, three wolves rampant argent.


Device conflicts with Faolan of Dundalk (SCA), Vert masoned Or, three wolves rampant, each maintaining a sword bendwise sinister argent. There's a single CD, for the field. 10/93

Brangwain Forrestier. Name (see PENDED for device).


Brangwain does not appear to be a valid given name; Morgan & Morgan cites it as a surname only. We need evidence of its use as a period given name before we can register it. We might have substituted a similar name (e.g. Branwen), but the submitter disallowed corrections to her name. Her armory was pended under the holding name Sonya of Stan Wyrm. 03/93

Brendan Hugh Guarin. Device. Sable, an equal-armed Celtic cross and in sinister chief three bendlets argent.


The device is excessivly imbalanced, which is not period heraldic style. A similar device (Penelope of the Quill, Vert, a quill pen bendwise and three bendlets enhanced Or) was returned Jan 92 for the same reason. He might try putting another set of bendlets in sinister base to balance the design. 09/92

Briallen o Llanrwst. Name.


Briallen is the Welsh for "primrose", and does not seem to have been a given name in period; nor does it belong to a class of common nouns that were regularly used as names in period Welsh. The submitter needs a given name.


When she resubmits, she should know that Welsh placenames didn't usually use a preposition; when they did, they were often mutated. In this case, she could be X Llanrwst or X o Lanrwst, but not o Llanrwst. 08/92

Brian Broadaxe. Device. Per pale gules and argent, two battleaxes in saltire counterchanged.


Conflicts with Akutagawa: Dark, two battleaxes in saltire light (Hawley's Mon, p.67). The tincture of the field counts for one CD, but according to Rule for Submission X.4.d, tinctureless armory may not count difference for the tincture of the charges. 9/93

Brian di Caffa. Device. Or, a slip eradicated joined to a snake's head vert, on a base rayonny gules an increscent Or.


The monster doesn't appear to have been formed in a period style; the only comparable example in period (non-armorial) art was the vegetable lamb, a tree that bore sheep as its "fruit". It was described by Sir John Mandeville, c.1371, and was evidently an attempt to describe cotton, not a mythical beast. The example of the vegetable lamb does not support the monster shown here.


The College of Arms was nearly unanimous in declaring this monster to be obtrusively modern: the references to triffids (from Day of the Triffid) and Audrey (from Little Shop of Horrors) were very strong. Laurel hasn't seen any of the productions of either, but is willing to accept the opinions of those who have. 09/92

Briana ní óda. Device. Argent, an enfield salient to sinister reguardant and biting its tail sable, a bordure embattled gules.


This conflicts with Sofiye Darkhawk (SCA): Argent, a wolf statant erect contourny reguardant sable, breathing flames and sustaining a finger ring gules, gemmed azure. Sofiye's ring is a significant secondary charge; changing it to a bordure is worth a CD. But the main difference between a wolf and an enfield is in the front legs; when one of the beasts is holding a charge with those legs, it becomes impossible to tell the two creatures apart. We cannot give a second CD for type of primary here. 07/92

Briana O'Laighin of Galway. Badge. Azure, three hares salient, heads to center, argent.


This conflicts with Leverton (Papworth 159), Azure, three hares argent; and with Leverington (ibid), Azure, three leverets courant in pale argent. In each case there's a single CD, for posture (against Leverton) or for placement on the field (against Leverington). 10/92

Brianna ní Dhonnachaidh. Badge. Azure, seven bees in annulo, tails outward Or.


Conflicts with the arms of Freppel (Woodward 91): Azure, a bee Or. There's a single CD, for number of bees.


It also conflicts with the badge of the Emperor Napoleon: Azure, semy of bees Or. The badge was used on his coronation robes, and granted by him as an augmentation to Grand Dignitaries of the Empire. (von Volborth's Little Manual of Heraldry, p.59) There is at best a single CD for placement on the field, and even that may be argued. 10/92

Brighid Aileen O'Hagan. Device. Gules, on a pale wavy between in chief a decrescent and an increscent argent, three mullets azure.


This sort of wavy ordinary, with the waves opposed instead of parallel ("wavy bretessed" instead of "wavy-counter-wavy"), was returned on the LoAR of Dec 91 as a non-period depiction. The strangeness of the motif would have been more obvious here, had the wavy lines been drawn in a bold medieval style; the fact that they weren't contributes to the non-period depiction.


If this is resubmitted with correctly drawn wavy lines, it should be acceptable style. You might also suggest to the submitter that the crescents would be better centered, not in chief. 07/92

Brighid Aileen O'Hagan. Badge. Per bend gules and azure, a mullet within a decrescent argent.


This conflicts with the flag of the Republic of Turkey: Gules, a decrescent and between its points a mullet argent. There's a CD for the field, but the slight movement of the mullet from between the points to within the horns is not worth the second needed CD. 06/93

Brighid Charthach. Device. Per chevron vert and argent, in base a fret vert.


This conflicts with Eaton of Dunmoyline (Rietstap): Or, a fret vert. There's a CD for the field, but since the vert fret cannot overlie the vert portion of the field, there's no second CD for moving it to base.


A similar argument brings this in technical conflict with Dena (Papworth 882): Argent fretty vert. There's again a CD for the field. Per the LoAR cover letter of 10 Nov 92, we count no difference between fretty and a fret. Fretty would not move on the field, but the vert fretwork on the vert portion of the field would be invisible; the visual effect would be as drawn here, without even a possible CD for change of placement. 12/92

Brion Domhnall MacGhille Brighde. Badge. Azure, a thistle argent within four claymores fretted as a delf Or.


This conflicts with the badge of the British 9th Division (Milord #689): Azure, a thistle slipped and leaved all argent. There's a single CD for the addition of the swords. 05/93

Bronwen O'Riordan. Device. Argent, a raven rising, wings addorsed sable, on a chief dovetailed azure three portcullises argent.


No one who saw this emblazon could identify the tertiary charges as portcullises. (Guesses ranged from "beehives" to "demi-Goodyear tires affronty".) Portcullises in heraldic art are generally identified by their square grillwork and their dangling chains. Omitting one of those aspects might be dismissed as artistic license; omitting both of them renders the portcullises unidentifiable, and so unregisterable. If this is resubmitted with correctly drawn portcullises, it should be acceptable style. 07/92

Bronwyn ferch Arial. Name.


Arial is not a valid Welsh given name, but a common noun meaning "vigor, liveliness". It must be documented as a given name before it may be used in a patronymic construction. Although Ar- and -ial are Welsh name themes found in Lady Harpy's monograph (Caidan KWHS Proceedings), neither of them is (to quote the monograph) a "substantial" element. Names coined from the themes in that monograph must include a substantial element. (To invent some English equivalents for illustration purposes: if Strong, Black and Spear were name themes, then Strongspear and Blackspear would be fine, but Strongblack would not.) Without documentation, Arial may not be used.


As long as we're returning the name anyway, the submitter should be told that Bronwyn is the masculine form of the name; the feminine form is Bronwen. Please let her know this before she resubmits. 07/92

Brychen Silverfist. Device. Gules, on a pale sable fimbriated Or between two cubit arms argent, an arrow inverted surmounted by two axes in saltire Or.


The device is overly complex. It uses four tinctures and four types of charge, which by Rule VIII.1.a makes it marginal at best; the use of the fimbriation pushes it over the edge. This must be returned for simplification.


Moreover, the arrow was drawn with small, nigh-invisible point and fletching, which has been reason for return ere now. If he uses an arrow in his resubmission, please instruct the client to draw it with large, visible fletching and point. 05/93

Brynjolfr Myrkjartanarson. Household name for Compaignie Mercurie.


The name is a technical infringement on the planet Mercury; according to the OED, it was spelled as Mercurie in period and was known to be a place. It's certainly famous enough to protect. We might have argued jesuitically that, per the Administrative Handbook (p.3), the College protects only "geographical locations" -- with emphasis on geo-, "earth". But that line of reasoning would seem to open the door for such submissions as House of Antares, and we have a long history of returning extra-terrestrial names.


There were some comments about the electronic nature of the household, but the College doesn't concern itself with households' exact organization. And while the name might be argued to conflict with the Roman god Mercury -- who, like the planet, meets the criteria for protection in the Handbook -- allusions to supernatural guardians were common enough to allow us to call it clear. That is, Compaignie Mercurie no more conflicts with the god Mercury than, say, the Company of St. Jude conflicts with St. Jude. 10/92

Caelin of Applecross. Device. Purpure, a saltire between four apples slipped and leaved Or.


Conflicts with Bonbrut (Papworth 1060): Purpure, a saltire Or. There is only once CD for the addition of the secondary charges. This also conflicts with Katya Wanderer (SCA): Purpure, a saltire between in pale two mullets of four points and in fess an increscent and a decrescent Or. In this case, there in only one CD for the change in type of secondary charges. 9/93

Caelina Lærd Reisende. Device resubmission. Or vêtu ployé vert fretty of arrows Or, an open book argent bound sable.


The device suffers from multiple problems, each sufficient for return. First, vêtu fields should not have charges in the "vested" portions of the field -- and although this was blazoned on the LOI as a lozenge concave throughout, the latter two adjectives almost mandate this be considered a vêtu field. Second, the arrows in the fretwork pattern are not throughout, as a true fretty pattern should be, but only as long as the span between intersections. We are aware of no such "fretty" of charges, other than the standard fretty of bendlets and scarpes. Even were the arrows drawn with substantial points and fletching (which these are not), they would be unidentifiable when conjoined in this pattern.


Finally, the book is essentially argent on Or, in violation of the Rule of Contrast. The black binding does not remove the problem, as fimbriation might -- for it doesn't completely surround the charge. We suggest a complete redesign. 12/92

Caerthe, Barony of. Badge for the Order of the Sable Lion of Caerthe. (fieldless) Two rapiers crossed in saltire gules surmounted by a lion's head erased sable.


Returned for being heraldically identical with the already registered badge of the Order, registered August 1991: (fieldless) Two swords crossed in saltire gules surmounted by a lion's head erased sable. The rapiers are swords; the designs are identical for all practical purposes. The current badge can be drawn in this form if they please, using a specific style of sword (rapiers, shamshirs, or whatever), but the distinction cannot be registered. (Note: they can submit something that's at least a CD away from this as an additional badge for the order, however. There's nothing to prevent an Order from having more than one badge; the Order of the Garter has multiple badges, and so does the SCA's Order of the Rose.) 10/93

Cailean McArdle. Device. Vert, on a pile indented argent a sword inverted gules.


The indentations on the pile are too small to be considered good medieval style. For an example of a medieval pile indented, see the arms of Sire John de Forneus, 1322 (Foster, p.91). 09/92

Caitlin Davies. Household badge for House Windsmeet. (fieldless) A seeblatt gules.


The badge conflicts with the arms of van Huls (Rietstap): Or, a water-lily leaf [in some blazons a linden leaf] gules. There's a single CD, for the field.


Lord Leveret (now Lord Brachet) has brought up a possible conflict with the badge of Douglas, Earls of Douglas (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges): (fieldless) A heart gules. His staff has found evidence that the blazon seeblatt could be emblazoned either in its standard form, or in a form indistinguishable from a heart (in the arms of the Duchy of Engern, 16th Century). I've found corroboration in Neubecker & Rentzmann's 10000 Wappen von Staaten und Städten, pp.147, 285: the arms of the Bishopric of Vyborg, in Finland, were blazoned (and emblazoned) either as three hearts conjoined in pall inverted or three seeblätter conjoined in pall inverted.


There are still enough distinct renditions of seeblätter and hearts in period (e.g. the Armorial de Gelre, or Siebmacher) that I hesitate to rule them purely artistic variants. However, there can clearly be cases of visual conflict involving the charges, and the badge of Douglas is such a visual conflict. This is another reason for return. The submitter might consider changing the charge's tincture. 05/93

Caitlin de Fernon. Device resubmission. Per pale azure and argent, a tree blasted and eradicated counterchanged.


This is a visual conflict with Roewynne Langley (SCA): Per pale azure and argent, a rowan tree eradicated and sundered in pale counterchanged argent and vert. There's a CD for tincture to half the tree, but the sundering of Roewynne's tree is very slight; and the tree is drawn with so few leaves as to be indistinguishable from blasted. 09/92

Caitlin Magwynne of Dolwyddelan. Name.


The submitter justifies Magwynne as a Welsh name (Gwynne) with an Irish patronymic particle, which is disallowed per Rule III.2.a. There are several possible alternatives -- e.g. the Irish surname Mac Guinn, or the Anglo-Saxon Mægwynn -- but the submitter forbade any spelling changes to her name. 01/93

Caitlyn Emrys. Badge. Azure, a peacock in its pride argent.


This conflicts exactly with the arms of Peterswaldski: D'azur à un paon rouant d'argent (Azure, a peacock in its pride argent) (Rietstap). 9/93

Caitlyn Emrys. Argent, a peacock pavonated to base and a dexter tierce azure.


This conflicts with the badge of Tannis of Tir-y-Don (SCA): Argent, a peacock passant reguardant pavonated to base proper. There being little difference between a peacock proper and a peacock azure, there is a single CD, for the tierce. 9/93

Cala of Savatthi. Device resubmission. Gules, in pale a butterfly and a lotus flower in profile argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Rancrolles (Rietstap): Gules, a butterfly argent, marked sable. There's a CD, for adding the lotus flower.


The blazon on the LOI had omitted the tincture of the charges. Normally, the submission would be pended to allow for commentary under the correct blazon; however, having discovered the above conflict, it seemed unfair to make the submitter wait longer than needful. We regret not having noted this conflict during her previous submission. 03/93

Calum MacDhaibhidh. Device. Vair, a mermaid proper crined gules maintaining two swords and on a chief sable, three mullets of seven points argent.


This has a complexity count of ten, with four types of charges and six tinctures (counting flesh proper, vert, and the gules hair separately). In addition, the mermaid is drawn in a naturalistic posture; not a heraldic one. This submission needs to be simplified and the mermaid needs to be drawn correctly. 9/93

Caoimhín Fionnbharr Mac Siúrtáin. Device. Per bend sinister Or and vert, a bull's head cabossed counterchanged, in chief an annulet of Celtic knotwork sable, the interstices filled vert.


The charge in chief was blazoned simply as an annulet in the LOI. In fact, it is a ring of Celtic knotwork -- not even knots conjoined in annulo, but actual Celtic knotwork as found in the Book of Kells, with the plaits sable and the spaces between the plaits vert. As such, it is not period heraldic style: for one thing, it cannot be blazoned in a way that permits the emblazon to be reproduced. Celtic knotwork has been banned from Society armory for many years (v. the LoAR of 10 March 78). This must be returned. 7/93

Caolaidhe mac Ceaird. Device. Pean, on a chief Or two "Norse serpents" respectant, conjoined at the tail gules.


The charges on the chief are not Norse serpents, which by definition are nowed (and usually have head lappets and forelegs). We spent some time trying to devise an accurate reblazon, without success: snake's heads conjoined they are not, for they have crests; dragon's heads conjoined they are not, for there is a solid bar between them; double-headed drakkar it is not, for there's no sail, shields or oars. Eventually, I decided that a charge requiring so much effort to blazon is probably not a reasonable charge. This is being returned for either documentation or redrawing. 08/92

Caomhghin O'Ruairc. Name change (from Caomhghin O'Rourke).


As far as we can determine, the purely Irish Ruairc would not have been used with the anglicized particle O' (with an apostrophe); the correct Irish spelling of the anglicized "O'Rourke" is Ó Ruairc, with a fada. The submitter allowed no grammatical corrections to the name. 06/93

Caradoc Cadwgan Douglas. Device. Sable, a staff bendwise sinister between a falcon rising contourny, wings addorsed and a fish haurient argent.


The three charges are of roughly equal visual weight, making this a single group of three dissimilar charges (so called "slot-machine heraldry"). This is not permitted, per Rule VIII.1.a. He might try deleting the staff, and rearranging the remaining charges in a more heraldic placement. 10/93

Carlwyn George Ordragoun of Canterbury. Badge. Azure, on a pall argent, three Canterbury crosses gules.


This conflicts with Collet (Woodward 150): Azure, a pall argent. There's a single CD, for the tertiary charges. 12/92

Caroline de Chesnei. Device. Azure, on a bend argent between two griffins segreant Or, three acorns palewise azure.


Conflicts with Jean-Marc de Folleville (SCA): Azure, on a bend argent between a mace erect and a barrel palewise Or, three fleurs-de-lys palewise azure. There's a CD for the change in type of secondary charge. Since Jean-Marc's secondaries are dissimilar, Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply to this case; it requires both the armories under comparison to be simple. We thus cannot grant a CD for the single change (of type) of the tertiary charges. 03/93

Carolingia, Barony of. Name for the Guild of Calligraphers of Carolingia.


The earliest citation for the word calligrapher in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1753 (v. 2, p. 38). Even the root word calligraphy is dated only to 1613, post period (though it is in the SCA's gray period). Therefore, the word calligrapher is two logical steps removed from period usage and is therefore unacceptable. 9/93

Caslan a Saint Keverne. Name.


Caslan does not appear to be a valid given name. The LOI derives it from the surname Ó Caisealáin, but not all surnames of that form are patronymics derived from the father's name: e.g. Ó Gabhann (O'Gowan) is derived from the Irish for "smith", not a given name. Moreover, Ó Caisealáin may not be the original form of the surname: Woulfe gives it as a variant of Ó Caiseadáin, which Lord Palimpsest suspects derives ultimately from the given name Caiside; but that wouldn't be anglicized as Caslan, and we have no similar sounding names to substitute. The submitter might consider the Cornish given name Caswyn; and, if he desires a truly Cornish toponymic, he might use the Cornish name for Saint Keverne, which is Lanhevran. 04/93

Cathair Dhaibhaidh, College of. Device resubmission. Argent, on a pale azure a plate indented, overall a laurel wreath vert.


This conflicts with the badge for the King of Caid (SCA): Argent, on a pale azure a crescent argent. There's a CD for the addition of the laurel wreath, but the case is not simple enough for Rule X.4.j.ii to apply; change of tertiary type alone is not enough for the second needed CD.


Some commenters had wondered whether the presence of an overall charge automatically brings a design outside the scope of X.4.j.ii. As currently worded, Rule X.4.j.ii.b applies to "an ordinary ... accompanied only by a single group of identical charges on the field." Overall charges, in most cases, are not considered in the same class as charges on the field: they are separate categories of difference (X.4.b and X.4.c), for instance, and VIII.2.b.i refers to contrast between the field and "every charge placed directly on it and with charges placed overall", implying these are separate. Since the Rules don't seem to consider overall charges to be "directly on the field", X.4.j.ii.b doesn't apply to overall charges.


Lord Owen gives another argument: Rule X.4.j.ii.b only applies if the ordinary is charged, not the accompanying secondary charge. If the secondary charge were to overlie the ordinary, it would crowd the tertiaries and render them harder to identify. That seems to contradict the intended purpose of the Rule, that simple armorial design meet less stringent difference standards. I have to agree with this. The presence of the overall charge prevents this design from being considered "simple armory" within the meaning of Rule X.4.j.ii. No CDs can be granted for type alone of tertiary. This remains a conflict with the badge of Caid. They might consider changing the tincture of the tertiary, or of the field. 03/93

Cathan MacCullaich. Device. Sable, on a chief dovetailed argent, in pale a pineapple inverted and a bar vert.


Unfortunately, even in the full-sized emblazon, the charge on the chief was not identifiable as a pineapple. Laurel's staff couldn't tell whether the submitter intended the period meaning of the term (= "pine cone") or the modern meaning (= spiky fruit from Hawaii); we couldn't even tell if it was inverted or not.


Assuming the submitter intended the period meaning of the term, we suggest he redraw this so that the pinecone, and its posture, can be identified. Better still would be a slight redesign, using three pinecones and deleting the bar on the chief. 03/93

Catherine Elizabeth Anne Somerton. Device. Per fess azure and vert, a pansy Or marked sable.


This conflicts with the Mon of Imabori (Hawley 37): Dark, an ivy blossom light. Comparing the emblazons showed no visible difference in the shapes of the two flowers; there is thus a single CD, for tincturelessness of the Mon.


It also conflicts with the arms of Cossington (Papworth 859): Azure, a rose Or. There's a CD for the field, but I cannot grant another CD for type of flower in this case. It's true that flowers of genus Viola have three large petals and two small ones; but in the case of the pansy, the size change is very hard to see. The petals' shape is the same for pansies as heraldic roses. Pansies don't seem to have been used as charges in period, so I must fall back on visual difference; and I must rule that pansies and roses are too close to yield a CD.


The same arguments bring this clear of Lisa of Toad Hall (SCA), Azure, a sunflower proper; and Ragna Dzintara of Amberhall (SCA), A rue flower Or, slipped and leaved vert. 08/92

Catherine Elizabeth Holly Winthrop of Lincolnshire. Name.


This name has too many elements to be considered period style. Withycombe (p.xliii) mentions "very rare, isolated examples" of period names with multiple name elements: they grow more common in the late 16th Century, but don't become abundant until the 17th Century. Of those rare instances that do occur, three elements seem to have been the norm: e.g. John William Whytting, c.1386; Robert Browne Lilly, b.1593; Arthur Rous Russhe, b.1564. English names with four elements are so rare in period that I would consider the usage a "weirdness", costing a submitter the benefit of the doubt; and English names with five elements, like this submitter's, I must consider over the edge of acceptability. We might have deleted an element, but it seemed better that the submitter make her own choice. 07/92

Catlin Elisabeth Feverfalke. Name.


The byname is German for "fire hawk", which doesn't seem to match period exemplars for bynames. In the recent case of Gaius Firehawk MacLeod (LoAR of Jan 93), Firehawk was acceptable only because of its meaning of "proud hawk" (fire is an alternate spelling of ME fere, "proud"). No such justification can apply to the current submission; it can only mean "hawk [made] of fire", a highly suspect meaning. We have no evidence that a bird made of flame is a reasonable period concept -- even the phoenix was only issuant from flame, not composed of it -- and we need such evidence before we can register the epithet. 03/93

Catraoine ni Risteaird. Badge. (fieldless) A cat sejant tergiant vert.


Sejant tergiant is not an heraldic posture, previous registrations notwithstanding. It renders the cat unrecognizable, where the whole purpose of heraldry is identification. 09/92

Catriona Mairghread nic Dhuibh of Moray. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) On a flame proper, a closed pair of scissors inverted argent.


The previous submission had the flame Or, outlined gules; the argent scissors thus had no contrast with the (mostly Or) flame. This resubmission now has the flame gules, outlined Or, providing sufficient contrast -- but introducing conflicts. This conflicts with Grimm the Hele-bourne (SCA), Sable, on a flame gules fimbriated Or, a skull argent; and with Reginleif the Unruly (SCA), Sable, on a flame gules fimbriated Or a rough-legged draught horse forceny argent. In each case, there's a CD for fieldlessness, but change of tertiary type alone isn't enough for the second CD. 11/92

Catriona nicHugh McLae. Device change. Argent, three cinquefoils and a chief wavy azure.


The flowers were blazoned on the LOI as gillyflowers, but were drawn as cinquefoils. Under that blazon, this conflicts with the arms of Chokke (Papworth 871): Argent, three cinquefoils azure. There's a single CD, for the chief. 03/93

Cearnach of Stonemarche. Device. Gules, on a demi-sun issuant from base Or a turtle vert.


This conflicts with the badge of the Oregon National Guard (Military Ordinary #98): Gules, the setting sun issuant of twelve rays throughout Or, thereupon a beaver sejant erect proper. There is a CD, for the changes to the tertiary on the demi-sun. (Note that, while the badge has a specified shape for its display surface -- a demi-roundel -- that isn't part of the badge, any more than the inescutcheon-shaped display surface is part of the arms of England.) 08/92

Cecelia Cormary. Device. Per bend sinister vert and azure, a sea-horse contourny argent.


This conflict with the device of Elspeth Grizell of Dunfort (SCA): Quarterly vert and purpure, a sea-horse contourny argent. There's a single CD, for the field. 8/93

Cecilia MacInnes. Badge. (fieldless) On an eagle displayed argent, a rose azure.


This conflicts with Sebastian Alexander Stormmane (SCA): Sable, an owl displayed argent holding on its breast a rose gules. The owl and the eagle are both raptors, and the main difference between them -- the head posture -- is specifically worth no CDs per Rule X.4.h. Tincture alone of tertiary charge is likewise worth no CDs. The only countable difference is for fieldlessness. 09/92

Cecilia MacInnes. Device. Sable, an eagle close and on a chief argent, three roses azure.


This conflicts with the arms of White (Papworth 307): Sable, a dove argent and on a chief of the second, three crosses paty gules. There's a CD for the changes to the tertiaries, but prior Laurel precedent (LoAR of Nov 90, p.16) has granted no difference for bird type, when the birds are in identical postures. In this case, when the eagle isn't displayed, it loses most of the traits that let it be identified as an eagle. Almost the only such trait visible on an eagle close is its head crest -- and the heraldic dove has one, too. 09/92

Ceidyrch ap Llywelyn. Device. Per pale argent and sable, a pair of flaunches counterchanged.


This conflicts, alas, with the arms of Baringham (Papworth 1001): Per pale argent and sable. Flaunches do not appear to be primary charges, so Rule X.1 does not apply here; there is a single CD for their addition.


This was a very tough decision; evidence was available supporting either side of the question. The main issue boiled down to whether flaunches can ever be primary charges. If they can't, then the conflict is valid (as discussed in the LoAR of July 92, pp.23-24). Like the bordure, our prime example of a peripheral charge that can never be primary, the addition of flaunches need not disturb the placement of other charges on the field (July 92, p.6). On the other hand, unlike the bordure, flaunches can legitimately extend quite a ways into the field, increasing their visual dominance over a design.


In the end, the fact that flaunches are usually considered ordinaries (or sub-ordinaries, depending on the text) proved decisive. Ordinaries may be classed either as central ordinaries (e.g., the pale, fess, cross, etc.) or as peripheral ordinaries (e.g., the bordure, chief, base, etc.). No matter how they intrude into the field, flaunches do not cross its center, as central ordinaries would; therefore, they must be peripheral ordinaries. (Another peripheral ordinary, the chief, can legitimately extend into an unoccupied field quite as much as can flaunches.)


In the case of Eleonora Vittoria Alberti di Calabria (LoAR of Dec 92), it was decided that Rule X.4.j.ii applies to charged flaunches alone on the field. Since flaunches aren't in the center of the field, the only examples of the Rule that support the decision are those of X.4.j.ii (d), the examples involving peripheral charges. This confirms the general impression among the College that flaunches are peripheral -- and therefore cannot be primary, and cannot invoke Rule X.1.


The submitter might try a slight change of field: tincture, perhaps, or a complex line of division. When he resubmits, please instruct him to draw the flaunches correctly: issuant from the corners of the chief. 06/93

Ceridwen Maelor verch Gruffydd. Device. Argent, a horse rampant and a chief rayonny pean.


The rayonny line of the chief is drawn far too small to be seen at any distance. Medieval armory used boldly drawn lines, the better to be seen and identified. This must be returned for redrawing. 12/92

Cerridwen du Potier. Device. Purpure, a snowflake within a bordure argent.


This conflicts with Cerelia de Lacy of Sherborne (SCA), Purpure, an escarbuncle argent. There is only the CD for adding the bordure. 10/93

Cerridwen nic Alister. Badge. Purpure, "three leaves conjoined in pall" within an annulet fracted in pall argent.


The blazon and emblazon given in the LOI did not match that on the forms we received. On the LOI emblazon, the central charge would be better blazoned three leaves conjoined in pall inverted. On the forms, the central charge looks to be some type of lotus or lily flower, which we couldn't identify. Normally, given a discrepancy between the forms and the LOI, we would pend the submission; but that can't be done here, without a blazon for the unidentifiable central charge. This must therefore be returned. 01/93

Cerridwen nic Alister. Device. Vert, on a pale purpure fimbriated ermine two axe-heads, blades to chief, overall a lion passant Or.


The device is overly complex. Ermine fimbriation is disallowed (LoAR of 3 Aug 86, p.17), as are overall charges surmounting fimbriated ordinaries (9 March 86, p.12). Reblazoning this as Vert, on a pale ermine a pallet purpure charged with two axe-heads ... overall a lion passant Or would remove those objections, but then the axe-heads would be obvious quaternary charges. No matter how blazoned, this is unacceptably complex. 10/92

Cerridwen verch Davydd. Name.


This conflicts with Ceridwen Dafydd (SCA). 9/93

Charles of the Painted Glen. Device. Azure, a chevron inverted debased argent, surmounted by a winged lion rampant to sinister Or, winged argent, and in chief two compass stars Or.


The submission suffers from several anomalies. The chevron inverted is definitely debased, so much that the fact must be blazoned; but no evidence has been presented chevrons (inverted or not) were blazoned or drawn "debased" in period. The lion seems to be drawn in art deco style -- most particularly the wings -- and as noted in the LOI, it's not particularly leonine in appearance. The design as a whole doesn't appear to be medieval. 11/92

Christian Guillaume de Saint Clair. Device. Gules, on a cross argent between four threaded needles bendwise sinister Or, a rapier sable.


As drawn, the needles are too small to be identifiable. Sewing needles are difficult to identify under the best circumstances; when drawn this small, the problem becomes fatal. This must be returned for redrawing. 06/93

Christian Vicarius. Name.


Though each element in the name is reasonable in itself, the combination is too evocative of the title Vicar of Christ (Christis Vicarius), one of the titles of the Pope. 09/92

Christobelle Andrea atte Layne. Device. Sable, on a cross wavy Or between four fleurs-de-lys argent, a fleur-de-lys sable.


The waves on the cross are drawn far too small to be identifiable at any distance. This must be returned for redrawing, per Rule VIII.3. When she resubmits, please be sure that the wavy lines are parallel ("wavy counter-wavy" rather than "wavy bretessed"). 05/93

Christof Gately. Badge. (fieldless) Two spears in saltire argent hafted proper, surmounted by a serpent in annulo, with a head at either end argent.


The spears are not identifiable as spears: the points are far too small, and not the normal shape for heraldic spearheads. If this were resubmitted with correctly drawn spears, it would probably be acceptable; but it would be better if the spears' hafts were not proper.


The overall charge is acceptable in this design, per the LoAR cover letter of 15 Jan 93: the charges are slender, and the area of intersection small. 01/93

Christopher of York. Badge. (fieldless) A rose argent winged sable.


The use of the white rose of York with the byname of York has been disallowed since the LoAR of 11 Nov 77; it is currently found as one of our prohibited name/charge combinations. 12/92

Chryse Raptes. Device. Vairy sable and Or, a bend and a bordure gules.


This conflicts with the mundane arms of Froidcourt (Rietstap): D'or à la bande de gueules à la bordure de même (Or, a bend gules, a bordure of the same).


There's a single CD, for field tincture. The College's ban on the international "no" symbol (a bend and bordure gules in combination) only applies when the combination is actually used as a "no" symbol: surmounting the symbol of whatever's being forbidden. The bend-bordure combination is not banned when there is no underlying charge. In this case, since vair isn't a charge, we find no stylistic problems here. 01/93

Chuzan, Canton of. Name and device resubmission. Per chevron azure and vert, on a sun within a laurel wreath Or, a phoenix rousant to sinister, wings addorsed gules.


The name conflicts with that of Chusan, largest island of the Chusan (or Chou-shan) archipelago, in the East China Sea. The name appears in several general references ('91 Encyclopedia Britannica, vol.3, pp.310, 270; New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.I, p.963), so it's important enough to protect.


There was some discussion as to whether this conflicts with Chuzan, the old name of central Okinawa (where the canton is located). The 1986 edition of the Rules for Submission permitted branch names to "use an old in-period name for the territory actually encompassed in the mundane world by that branch", so long as the old name wasn't in modern use (NR18.c). Thus, for instance, a Society branch along the Atlantic Canadian coast could call itself Vinland under the old Rules.


The current Rules do not contain that provision for obsolete placenames to be used by Society branches. I asked Mistress Alisoun, former Laurel Queen of Arms, and she told me the omission was deliberate. The 1986 Rules protected all mundane placenames, no matter how unimportant or obscure; a special dispensation for SCA branches was sometimes needed. The current Rules protect only famous or important placenames. Thus, if the obsolete name for a territory currently occupied by a Society branch is important or famous, it's protected against conflict by anyone (including the SCA branch); if the obsolete name is unimportant, there's no conflict in the first place, and any branch could use the name.


I could not find the Kingdom of Chuzan mentioned in any of several general references; by our standards, it's not considered important enough to protect. And according to Lord El-Munadi, Okinawa was a Japanese pirate haven before and during Japan's contact with Europeans; so it's possible that Europeans could have known about Chuzan. But the conflict with the Chusan islands renders the point moot.


The device looks acceptable, but must be returned for lack of a name; branches aren't assigned holding names. The phoenix in the submission was blazoned rising, but phoenices are generally so blazoned, even when in their default displayed posture; we have reblazoned this one to remove the ambiguity. 09/92

Ciar Reul. Device resubmission. Per pale sable and argent, vêtu, a mullet of eight points counterchanged.


The previous submission (Per pale sable and argent, vêtu, a sun counterchanged) was returned for conflict on the LoAR of March 92. This resubmission had been blazoned on the LOI as Per pale argent and sable, on a lozenge throughout a mullet of eight points counterchanged -- which is effectively the same picture in different words. There is no difference between vêtu and a lozenge throughout, and none between a sun and a multi-pointed mullet (8 or more points). As with the previous submission, this remains a conflict with Jennet of Twominds (SCA): Per pale argent and sable, a sun in his splendour of the field rayed and featured counterchanged. There is a single CD, for the field. 01/93

Cilian Ui Neill. Name.


The grammar of the byname was incorrect: it should be Ua Neill, "descendant of Niall", not Ui Neill, "descendants of Niall". However, under either spelling, this conflicts with Killian O'Neal, registered July 88.


The armory was registered under the holding name Troy of Stan Wyrm. 01/93

Clarissa Wykeham. Device. Or, on a chevron azure between three hearts gules, two daggers conjoined at their points argent.


This conflicts with Bladt (Rietstap): D'or au chevron d'azur, accompagné de trois coeurs de gueles (Or, a chevron azure between three hearts gules). There's one CD, for the addition of the tertiaries. If she resubmits with a similar design, please have her draw the daggers larger. 11/92

Claudwick von Naerdinckhove. Name.


The name suffers from a lack of documentation. Claudwick was submitted as a variant of Chlodovech, but none of the attested variants of that name (Chludovicus, Lodewicus, Ludwich, &c) have the initial vowel of Claudwick. Naerdinckhove was intended to be a Dutch construction from Naerdinck (asserted to be an early form of Naarden) and -hove "court, farm"; but while Naarden is a documented place, we have no evidence that it was ever called Naerdinck. Finally, the preposition von is German; for this Dutch name, van would be the correct form. This needs extensive reworking. 12/92

Coemgen MacDaid. Device. Per fess embattled azure and vert, a stag lodged Or, in chief two pheons argent.


The embattled line of division will not be visible from any distance: it's not drawn very boldly, the field's colors have poor contrast, and the line is partially overlaid by the primary charge. (Indeed, it requires careful placement of the primary, and [to use Lord Fause Lozenge's phrase] "a careful choice of pigments", to see the line at all.) The combination of the three problems is reason enough to return this for redrawing. 11/92

Colin Douglas of Greysmarch. Device. Sable, in chief a boar's head couped close and in base a bow reversed and a sword in saltire, all within a double tressure argent.


The use of a single group of three dissimilar charges is not permitted, per Rule VIII.1.a. The exact arrangement of the three charges within the group (whether 2&1, a sheaf, or whatever) does not change this. 11/92

Colin MacDhaibhidh of Southkeep. Device. Vert, a chevron rompu argent.


Conflicts with the arms of Cuckle (Papworth 377), Vert, a chevron argent, as cited in the LOI. The submitter's appeal was based on the first-draft wording of Rule X.2, which called armories clear if there was "significant change" in their primary charges -- the same wording that granted a CVD under X.4.e. This amibiguity is exactly why Rule X.2 was reworded to require "substantial change", on the LoAR cover letter of 16 Oct 90: "A chevron vs. a chevron embattled is not a substantial change (both are, after all, the same type of charge, a chevron) for the purposes of this Rule." The same argument applies here.


This also conflicts with the device of Robyn Akre, registered Nov 91: Per pale counter-ermine and azure, a chevron rompu argent. There's a single CD, for the field. (Kudos to Lord Hund, who found this conflict; it isn't yet in the A&O.) 10/92

Colin the Hermit of Lindisfarne. Device. Argent, a tortoise statant vert, on a chief wavy sable an increscent argent.


As drawn, the wavy line of the chief is too shallow to be identified at any distance. This must be returned for redrawing, per Rule VIII.3.


If the client resubmits with this design, please instruct him to draw the tortoise larger, to fill the available space. 06/93

Conall Mac Roigh. Device. Argent mailed sable, a boar statant azure.


This conflicts with the badge of de Vere, Earls of Oxford (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.133): (Fieldless) A boar statant azure. There's a single CD, for the field (including the maily field treatment). 03/93

Connor Mac Loghan. Device. Argent, a set of bagpipes sable, a bordure sable semy of broadarrows inverted argent.


Bagpipes in period had at most two drones. Specifically, Scots bagpipes did not add the third, longer drone until the 18th Century. The set shown here is no more period than a saxophone. It's probable that the submitter didn't realize that bagpipes had changed since medieval times; if he resubmits with correctly drawn pipes, there should be no problems. 09/92

Connor Malcolm O'Maoilbhreanainn. Device. Quarterly gules and azure, the whole seme-de-lys Or, a hound rampant, tail nowed argent.


The use of Azure, semy-de-lys Or has been reason for return for the last ten years; it was reaffirmed on the LoAR of July 92. This must be returned for use of a prohibited treatment.

There was some concern about the Celtic rendering of the hound. I hold identifiability to be the criterion for judging a submission, not necessarily the school of its style. So long as the hound is recognizably a hound, it may be drawn with suggestions of "Book of Kells" style; too many such suggestions, however, can make the hound unidentifiable, and be reason for return. The submitter should know this, when he resubmits. 09/92

Cordelia of Diamond Cove. Device. Argent, a mermaid in her vanity proper, crined sable, on a chief invected azure three escallops inverted argent.


This conflicts with the device of Emmaline Marie Chandelle (SCA): Argent, a melusine proper, crined Or, within a bordure azure, semy of escallops inverted argent. There's a CD for type of secondary charge; no difference for change of number only of tertiaries on that charge; no difference for hair color, as an artistic detail; and no difference for melusine vs. mermaid.


I consider vestments on humanoids to be artistic license. 07/92

Cordula von Wolfstein. Device. Azure vêtu, a Pyrenean mountain dog passant argent maintaining a sword proper.


Conflicts with several examples of the form [FIELD], a [DOG] passant argent, of which Borgoine: Azure, a talbot passant argent, (Papworth, p.60) is typical. There is only one CD for the change of the field; the held charge counts for no difference. 9/93

Creirdyddlydd of Rhuddlan. Name and device. Azure, in pale a dolphin haurient and a crescent, on a chief argent two borage flowers azure.


Creirdyddlydd doesn't appear to be a valid period given name. Its sole source is Yonge's History of Christian Names, which is notorious for its errors on Welsh names. Some authors believe that Geoffrey of Monmouth took the name Cordeilla from the Welsh Creiddylad, a character in the Mabinogion; but we have no evidence that Creiddylad ever passed into common usage, nor is it constructable from common Welsh name themes. We need better evidence before we can register this name.


The submitter did not permit the forming of a holding name, so the device could not be registered. Even were that not so, the dolphin is drawn in trian aspect, which has been grounds for return for the last decade. Please instruct her to draw her dolphin in profile when she resubmits. 05/93

Croraire, Shire of. Name.


There are two problems with the name, each sufficient for return. First, croraire is not the Irish for "crossroads". Apparently, it was a misreading of the documentation, which used a "Celtic" font with a long S: the correct term is crosaire. Second, were we to correct the spelling, this would conflict with the Barony of An Crosaire, in Trimaris. 7/93

Crystal Moor, Shire of. Device resubmission. Sable, a tongue of flame environed in base by a laurel wreath, between in chief two tongues of flame in chevron inverted Or, a base wavy and embowed to base barry wavy and embowed to base argent and azure.


Tongues of flame are not period, nor is embowing to base of complex lines. The placement of the three flames, of different sizes, is unbalancing. The entire design is strikingly non-period. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.4.

Moreover, we have received no petition of support from the populace for this device. 10/92

Cú Lúaráin Cáelán. Device resubmission. Azure, two swords inverted and two arrows fretted in cross argent.


Conflicts with the arms of Goudelin (Woodward 346): Azure, a sword inverted proper. There's a CD for adding the other three primary charges, but none for the arrangement of the charges just added. 10/92

Cynegyth de Hauteville. Device. Argent, on a pale engrailed azure, a feather argent.


The engrailed line is too shallow, and the engrails too small, to be visible from any distance. Please have her resubmit with a bolder engrailed line.

Against the badge of the King of Caid (Argent, on a pale azure a crescent argent), there's a CD for the complex line of the pale and, in this case, a CD for type of tertiary charge. 12/92

Cynthia of Oakenwode. Device. Bendy sinister and per bend gules and Or.


Conflicts with numerous instances of [FIELD DIVISION] gules and Or, including Ros: Chequy gules and Or (Papworth, p.371), and Berings: Lozengy gules and Or (Papworth, p.972). Rule for Submission X.4.a.ii allows field-only armory to count difference separately for changes to tincture, division, line of partition and treatment of the field. In these cases, there is change of division only; hence only one CD. It also conflicts with Epprecht: Barré contre-barré de sable et d'argent de six pièces (Bendy sinister and per bend sable and argent) (Rietstap). There is a CD for tincture, but not for the field division.

Versus Nani: Per bend Or and gules (Woodward, p. 80) it was argued in the commentary that the addition of the bendy sinister lines resulted in one half of the field tinctures changing and therefore worth a CD. A similar argument can be made against Flieres: Bendy sinister Or and gules (Rietstap) that the counterchanging across the per bend line can be considered a tincture change of one half of the field and also worth a second CD. These arguments are fallacious since they assume tincture changes forced by a field division change are independent of the field change itself. A more obvious example is the change from Quarterly gules and Or to Per saltire gules and Or. In this case, one half of the field (alternating gyrons) changes tincture. Yet only one CD is given for the field change because the tincture change is necessitated by the division change. The only difference between this submission and the examples above are the complexity of the field divisions involved. For tincture changes to count as difference in field only submissions, one of the tinctures must be changed to a tincture not involved with the division change. Therefore, this submission also conflicts with Nani and Flieres and also with Midland: Bendy of six gules and Or (Papworth, p. 291). 9/93

Cynthia Wren. Device. Azure, a snowflake argent within a bordure ermine.


Device returned for two reasons. First, no emblazon form was provided. Second, it conflicts with the US Arctic Test Center (Military Ordinary #1195), Azure, a snowflake points in pale argent, with only a CD for the addition of the border. 10/93

Daedin MacAoidh a'Mhonadh. Name change (from Daedin MacKay na Aonaich).


The name as submitted does not appear to be grammatically correct. The locative byname is intended to mean "of the moors" (plural); in Scots Gaelic, that would be nam monadh. The submitted form is closer to the Scots Gaelic for "of the moor" (singular), which is a' mhonaidh. According to Lord Palimpsest, the noun aspirates in the singular genitive case, but not the plural. The client contends (through Lord Lion's Blood) that the submitted form is a scribal abbreviation of nam monadh, which thus requires aspiration; but we would like to see some evidence of this grammatical departure before we accept it.

The patronymic likewise had some problems. The form submitted is a masculine construction unsuitable for a presumably feminine name; Nic Aoidh would be the appropriate form. The client opines that the submitted form is a "clan name", "of the MacKays", or possibly uses an omitted intermediate patronymic, "Daedin [nic X] Mac Kay ...". However, we've been given no evidence that either form is period practice -- and I know there are a great many submitters who would welcome such evidence. Moreover, even assuming these are acceptable constructions, they would still require the surname to be fully in the genitive case: MhicAoidh, anglicized VcKay.

Either of the variant forms suggested by the submitter will need to be documented before it can be registered. Lord Lion's Blood informs us that the submitter would rather have the name returned than have the grammar corrected. We will abide by her wishes. 9/93

Daene Ferris. Badge. (fieldless) A mullet of four points argent voided vert.


This could equally well be blazoned On a mullet of four points argent, another vert, and conflict must be considered under that blazon as well. This therefore conflicts with the badge of Astra Christiana Benedict (SCA), (tinctureless) On a mullet a cross crosslet. There's a CD for fieldlessness (tincturelessness), but not for the number of points on the mullet; and per Rule X.4.j.ii, no difference for type alone of tertiary.

It also conflicts with Yerek the Inert (SCA), Sable, a mullet of four points voided argent. As with this submission, Yerek's armory can equally well be blazoned Sable, on a mullet of four points argent, another sable; there's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for what is effectively the tincture of the tertiary charge. 11/92

Dafydd Aberystwyth. Device. Sable, a bend sinister embattled counter-embattled argent between a scorpion and a dragon's gambe couped appaumy Or.


The unorthodox posture of the dragon's gambe renders it completely unrecognizable. (Guesses at the Laurel meeting included a flower and a teddy bear, both assumed to be badly drawn. It also strongly resembles the Motie hand from the cover of the latest Niven & Pournelle novel.) Heraldic charges should be in heraldic postures, so they can be identified. This must be returned for redrawing.

Should the client resubmit with this motif, please instruct him to draw the bend's embattlements as boldly on the full-size emblazon sheet as on the miniature. 06/93

Dafydd ap Bleiddudd. Household badge for Amddiffynfa yn Niwl. (fieldless) A triple-towered castle argent supported between a boar and a dragon with lion's hindquarters combattant gules.


The three charges are of equal visual weight, making this a single group of three dissimilar charges. Such "slot-machine heraldry" is disallowed per Rule VIII.1.a.

The dragon-lion monster is unusual -- the accepted period hybrid of those creatures is the lion-dragon, with a lion's forequarters and wyvern's tail -- but would probably be acceptable by itself, in a simpler design. If the submitter has evidence of its period use, though, we'd appreciate a copy. 10/92

Dagmar Torsdottir. Badge for House Fierce. Sable, three bendlets enhanced within a bordure Or.

This conflicts with the arms of Duhurst (Papworth 286): Sable, two bendlets within a bordure Or. There is a CD for adding the third bendlet in chief. 08/92

Dallán ó Fearchaidhe vom Kirschwald. Device. Argent, the Chinese character chung gules between flaunches lozengy Or and sable.


While we're generally content to mix-and-match elements from different heraldic regimes, we draw the line at mixing oriental and occidental charges. The College of Arms has frequently restricted the use of charges from Japanese Mon to Mon-style submissions: e.g. the nami or Great Wave, restricted to Mon-style submissions on the LoAR of 25 Feb 83. The use of a Chinese ideogram with lozengy flaunches falls into the same restricted area.

In fact, the whole submission was rife with culture shock: an Irish/German name with a Chinese/Anglo-Norman device. We have accepted the Irish/German name, but the second cultural unorthodoxy on his armory was too much. 07/92

Damhnait mac Sitig. Name.


Withdrawn by the submitter. 9/93

Daniel de Lincoln. Badge. (fieldless) A cross nowy couped argent.


This conflicts with the badge of the George Cross, founded by King George VI in 1940: A cross couped surmounted by a medallion silver. There are inscriptions in the formal medallion, which contribute no difference in this case. (The informal medallion, hung from a chest ribbon, hasn't even the inscriptions: it's simply a cross surmounted by a plate.) The Cross is described by Franklyn & Tanner, p.146; and as the order's name is on our list of Protected Orders, in fairness the order's badge should be equally protected. 03/93

Daniel de Lincoln. Device (appeal). Azure, four coneys rampant in cross, heads to center, conjoined by the ears in annulo argent, playing upon bagpipes Or.


This submission was originally returned March 92 for conflict with Kineiland (Papworth 61), Azure, a hare salient argent, round the neck a hunting horn sable stringed gules. The submitter has appealed that return, arguing that there should be a CD for number of coneys, and a CD for posture of more than half the group.

Unfortunately, the appeal misses the point of the original return. One cannot get a CD for adding charges, then another CD for changing the charges just added. This has been an underlying principle of the last three sets of Rules: see the LoAR of 25 Aug 85, p.14, for a full discussion. The difference obtained for adding, say, a bordure engrailed ermine, is exactly the same as for adding a bordure Or. (One does not get a CD for adding the bordure, then a CD for changing its tincture, then another CD for making it engrailed.....)

To use an example closer to the current submission: Between, say, a lion rampant and two lions combattant we get a single CD, for adding the second lion. We don't get another CD for turning it to sinister, despite being half the new group of charges. The posture is, in effect, simply an attribute of the charge being added, along with its tincture and type. Adding the charge, whatever its attributes, is worth a single CD.

Had none of the coneys in Daniel's device been in the same posture as Kineiland's coney, then we could indeed obtain a CD for posture as well as for number. But so long as one coney has no countable difference from Kineiland, then we can only grant a single CD for adding the other three coneys. The submitter might try putting his coneys in saltire, instead of in cross. 07/92

Darius of Jaxartes. Device. Per pale sable and argent, a pale compony counterchanged, in sinister chief a bull's head cabossed gules.

The use of a compony ordinary that shares a tincture with its field has been disallowed since at least the LoAR of July 85; the precedent was confirmed Sept 87, April 89, and Aug 90. This submission is an excellent illustration of the reason for the ban: the visual appearance is not of a pale, but of a group of billets straddling the field division. The lack of identifiability is sufficient reason for return. We suggest making the pale a solid tincture. 8/93

Dark Horde. Badge. Per bend embowed counter-embowed sable and gules, a horse courant contourny argent.


This conflicts with Ileana del Mar (SCA): Quarterly azure and vert, a horse passant to sinister argent. There is a single CD, for the field. Moreover, per Rule VIII.3, a two-color field with a complex line of partition should not have the partition obscured by charges. The horse does obscure the line (unlike the Horde's device, which uses a skinny lightning flash), and is therefore not permitted. 09/92

David Evan McKuenn. Badge. (fieldess) An annulet sable, overall an eagle displayed Or breathing flames proper.


As blazoned, this violates the ban on overall charges in fieldless armory, which took effect Jan 93. As emblazoned, the eagle is not truly overall; while the eagle unquestionably overlaps the annulet, it doesn't really extend significantly beyond it. The resulting depiction isn't blazonable. For either reason, this must be returned; he might consider redrawing the eagle entirely within (and conjoined to the inner edge of) the annulet. 06/93

David Falkemeister. Name.


The correct German for "master of falcons" would be Falkenmeister. However, meister (master) is a reserved title in the SCA, and may not be registered -- either alone, or in combination. The submitter might consider resubmitting as Velkner, a period spelling of Falkner "falconer". 03/93

David van den Storm. Household name for Tempest Tower.


If Tower is considered the household designator (and therefore transparent with respect to conflict), this conflicts with the Order of the Tempest, registered to the Barony of Windmaster's Hill. Were we to add a designator (e.g. House Tempest Tower), so that Tower became the substantive element of the name, this would conflict with the Order of the Towers of Dreiburgen, of the Barony of Dreiburgen. The designator is transparent; the addition of the branch name is worth no difference, per the ruling on the Golden Swan of Calontir; the only countable difference, under the current Rules, is the addition of the adjective Tempest -- which is insufficient, per Rule V.2. Either way, this must be returned. 09/92

Davin FitzGalen. Name.


FitzGalen does not appear to be a validly constructed surname. The Norman patronymic particle Fitz should only be used with Norman names; Galen is an anglicization of the name of a 2nd Century Greek physician.

The LOI alluded to the name of Geoffrey FitzGalen, registered Jan 85, and suggested the Grandfather Clause may apply here. Contrary to the LOI's assertion, however, the two gentles do not appear to be brothers: one is surnamed Lane, and the other Mann. ("SCA persona brothers" don't meet the criteria for invoking the Grandfather Clause.) We find no grounds for admitting the submitted name; pending documentation, it must be returned.

The armory was registered under the holding name Jaimie of the East. 01/93

Deirdre Colintrie. Device. Azure, a dexter hand fesswise reversed, palm to chief argent, maintaining a flame gules fimbriated Or, between four escallops in cross, hinges to center argent.


The flame was blazoned on the LOI as proper, but it is fact gules fimbriated Or. Such fimbriation of complex charges is disallowed, per Rule VIII.3. Also, the cupped hand is not in a particularly recognizable posture.

Some commenters wondered whether the central charge could be considered a hand of glory, which isn't permitted in Society heraldry. The hand of glory is essentially a hand on fire: it's usually seen apaumy, and issuant small flames (especially at its fingers). The hand shown in this submission is simply holding a flame, and is not a hand of glory. 03/93

Denewulf Ringmaker. Device. Azure, a snake involved and in chief three annulets argent.


The use of almost-but-not-quite identical charges is unacceptable style; it confuses the eye, where the whole purpose of heraldry is visual recognition. This has been grounds for return ere now (v. the LoAR of 21 May 89, pp.18, 25).

Against the arms of Lauzon (Woodward 115), Azure, three serpents with their tails in their mouths argent, we count a CD for number of primaries and a CD for the addition of secondaries. Denewulf's annulets in chief are clearly secondary charges, of a different group than the central serpent. 12/92

Dervilia O'Shannon. Device. Per fess sable and azure, a fess wavy argent between three crescents and a dolphin naiant Or.


The wavy line was drawn too small to be considered a period rendition. Medieval wavy lines were drawn big, bold (so much that they were sometimes misblazoned nebuly by Victorian armorists). This must be returned for redrawing. 09/92

Dèvora Risèe de Apors. Badge. Gules, in pale a bat inverted and a pear Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Appleheim (Papworth 888): Gules, two apples in pale, stocks counterposed Or. We don't grant Substantial Difference between an apple and a pear -- there's at best a CD between the two fruits, and one could argue negligible difference. Either way, there's a single CD for type of charge: either for type of the primary charge group (if apples and pears are a CD apart), or for type of half the primary group (if they're negligibly different). Either way, it's a conflict. 7/93

Diana Delarosa di Pergola. Name.


The documentation for Delarosa was from Elsdon Smith's New Dictionary of American Family Names, a most untrustworthy source. Delarosa appears to be the Americanized form of the surname; the original Italian would be Della Rosa. The preposition was almost universally separated from the rest of the byname, according to Fucilla. The submitter forbade any grammatical corrections to her name. 08/92

Diarmait mac Alasdair Chaomhanaigh. Name and device. Per chevron inverted argent, and argent semy of thistles proper, a chevron inverted, in chief two Celtic hounds salient combattant "azure".


The hounds are drawn with a strong "Book of Kells" stylization, which makes them difficult to identify; and though blazoned on the LOI as azure, they are in fact multi-colored in blue, green, red and yellow, again as in the Kells style. Motifs from period art must be used sparingly at best; if they interfere with identification, they become ipso facto non-heraldic, and reason for return. Please instruct the submitter to use a more recognizable rendition of the hounds when he resubmits. 10/92

Diego Alfonso de Navarra. Device. Gules, on a bend Or between a castle argent and two roses Or, a chain gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Elliot (Papworth 249): Gules, on a bend Or a pipe (or flute) of the first. There's a CD for the addition of the secondaries; but because Diego's submission uses dissimilar secondary charges, Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply here; change of type alone of the tertiary isn't worth the second necessary CD.

When he resubmits, please instruct him to draw his chain with a few more links, so that it may more readily be recognized as a chain. 04/93

Dielle Stormsinger. Name.


Stormsinger doesn't appear to be a valid period byname; it smacks too much of fantasy, rather than history. We need some documentation for the name, or at least for similar names. 09/92

Dofinn-Hallr Morrisson. Badge. (fieldless) A tree trunk couped azure, its top bound by a chain sable.


The sable chain has insufficient contrast on the azure trunk. While artistic details are not as strictly bound by the Rule of Tincture as are primary charges, this submission still does not permit ready identification of all its charges. 8/93

Dolores Isabella Cisneros de los Gitanos. Name.


We have no evidence that Dolores was used as a given name in period. Withycombe's discussion suggests the name sprang from the veneration of Our Lady of Sorrows (Mater dolorosa). According to Metcalf's Dictionary of Christian Lore and Legend, pp.231-232, the observation of the Sorrows of the Virgin (by the Servite Order) began in 1668, and was not made universal in the Catholic Church until 1727; it seems unlikely that a given name could have been based on it in period. Pending evidence that Dolores is a reasonable period given name, it must be returned.

The changes permitted by the submitter would not eliminate the problematic portion of her name; since she permitted a holding name to be formed, however, her armory was registered under the name Camille of Brymstone College. Should she resubmit with a similar name, you might suggest that la Gitana "the Gypsy" would be a more reasonable epithet than de los Gitanos "of the Gypsies". 8/93

Dominica Leontyne du Lac. Household name and badge for House Dragon's Rose. (fieldless) On a rose proper a dragon sejant, wings close argent.


The name conflicts with the SCA's Order of the Rose; the designator (House, Order) is transparent, and counts for no difference, and per Rule V.2, the addition of the modifier (Dragon's) is insufficient difference. There was also considerable doubt as to whether House Dragon's Rose was a period-style house name; when she resubmits, the submitter will want to address that point as well.

The badge conflicts with the badge of Henry VII (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.112), (fieldless) A rose gules charged with another argent; and with the Town of Petersfield (Papworth 860), Argent, on a rose gules barbed vert an escutcheon of the first, charged with an annulet sable between four pellets. In each case there's a CD for fieldlessness; but change of type of tertiary charge is insufficient for a second CD here, per Rule X.4.j.ii. (The quaternary charges in Peterfield's arms aren't even considered under the Rules.) 01/93

Donal MacLaren. Device. Gules, a harp Or within an orle of mullets argent.


This conflicts with the arms of La Harpe (Woodward 384): Gules, a harp Or. There's a single CD, for the addition of the mullets. 7/93

Donata Ivanovna Basistova. Device. Per chevron sable and purpure, a hare sejant argent.


Hares, rabbits and coneys are sejant by default (Parker 306). This conflicts with Penhallow (Woodward), cited in the LOI: Vert, a coney argent. 07/92

Dorian Elwinwood. Name.


Dorian was not a name in period, but an adjective: "pertaining to the inhabitants of Doris, in Greece." Its first use as a given name was in Oscar Wilde's Portrait of Dorian Grey. The submitter needs a valid given name. 12/92

Drachenfaust, Canton of. Device. Argent, on a bend sinister wavy azure between a mountain couped and a tower sable, three laurel wreaths palewise argent.


There is no petition of support from the populace. The waves are of insufficient amplitude to be acceptable and need to be deepened. The laurel wreaths on the submission form are barely visible; they need to be drawn more prominently. 9/93

Dragonsspine, Barony of. Badge. (fieldless) On a triangle inverted Or, a dragon's head cabossed purpure.


If a charge can be considered a medium for heraldic display, it may not bear a tertiary in a fieldless badge: such a design is interpretable as a display of arms, with the tertiary as a primary. For instance, we don't permit (fieldless) On a lozenge argent a fleur-de-lys gules: since the lozenge is a medium for heraldic display, this looks like a display of Argent, a fleur-de-lys gules. Such arms-badge confusion is reason enough for return, even if the display in question doesn't conflict. In this case, the triangle inverted must be considered such a medium, comparable to the escutcheon, lozenge, or roundel. It may be considered either an early-style shield (Neubecker's Heraldry: Sources, Symbols and Meanings, p.76), or a lance-pennon.

Moreover, considered as a display, on a triangular shield, of Or, a dragon's head cabossed purpure, this conflicts with the badge for the Exchequer of the Kingdom of the East (SCA): Or, a dragon's head couped purpure. There is a single CD, for the head's posture. 03/93

Drake Greystarr. Name.


Drake doesn't appear to be a valid given name. The citation from Hanks & Hodges' Dictionary of Surnames supports only the use of Draca or Draki as given names; the English Drake seems to be solely a byname and surname. Without better evidence, we cannot register it as a given name.

The submitter's armory was registered under the holding name Gary of Dragon's Aerie. 03/93

Drei Eichen, Shire of. Device. Or, on a bend azure three acorns palewise Or, overall a laurel wreath vert.


This conflicts with Wat of Everleie (Papworth 236): Or, on a bend azure three escallops of the first. There's a CD for the addition of the laurel wreath. However, armory with an overall charge doesn't fit the definition of "simple armory" outlined in Rule X.4.j.ii. We therefore cannot give a second CD for change of type only of tertiaries. Putting a laurel wreath on either side of the bend would clear this conflict (assuming it doesn't introduce others).

Moreover, we have received no petition of popular support for this device. A petition was included, but only for the Shire's name. 12/92

Dugal MacTaveis. Badge. (fieldless) A sea-dragon passant gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Venables (Papworth 983): Argent, a wyvern passant gules. The only difference between a wyvern and a sea-dragon is the exact shape of the tail's flukes, not enough for a CD. 09/92

Duncan Ghlasthuagh. Badge. Or, a dragon's sinister forefoot reversed couped gules.


Badge conflicts with Thorkil ap Llwyd (SCA), (fieldless) A dragon's jamb couped gules, with only one CD for the tincture. (Thorkil's dragon's jamb is perfectly erect and essentially symmetrical, so the change in toe posture does not yield another CD.) 10/93

Duncan MacLeod of Edinbane. Name.


By the submitter's own documentation, Edinbane was planned and built in the 19th Century by Kenneth MacLeod; the submitter cannot have come from there in period. We would have deleted the toponymic, but the name would then have conflicted with Duncan MacLeod, hero of the "Highlander" television series. We hated to have to consider the latter conflict, but a random sampling of local SCA folk showed the majority recognized the character. 12/92

Duncan of Shadowwood. Device. Purpure, a double-horned anvil sable "enflamed" between three pheons inverted argent.


Though blazoned as enflamed on the LOI, the anvil was emblazoned as having flaming fimbriation. Fimbriation of a complex charge, such as an anvil, is itself grounds for return; when the fimbriation itself has a complex line, the design becomes doubly unacceptable. See the cover letter of the June 93 LoAR for a description of period enflaming, and suggest it to the submitter. 7/93

Dyana Greenwood. Device. Argent, on a tree proper issuant from a base purpure, a decrescent argent.


The submission has two problems, each sufficient for return. The first is conflict: this conflicts with the arms of Chauraun (Papworth 1112), Argent, out of a mount in base a tree growing vert, thereon a dove rising proper. There's a CD for the tincture of the base, but no difference for its embowed line of division, and none for type of tertiary on the tree.

The second is excessive reference to Diana, the Roman goddess of the moon and forest. We've ruled (LoAR of 23 Aug 92) that a deity name used by period humans may add a single additional reference to that deity. The use of Greenwood, the tree and the crescent each constitutes an allusion to the goddess Diana; we find the combination excessive. We've registered the name, but any device resubmission should avoid any references to the goddess Diana. 05/93

Dyryke Raleigh. Device. Azure, a cross moline purpure fimbriated, overall a rose argent.


Between the fimbriation and the overall charge, the cross ceases to be identifiable. The LOI's citation of a previous registration (Annyse Lionstone, June 91) doesn't support this: Annyse's device used a sable cross fimbriated on a gules field, which has better visibility than azure and purpure; and only one limb of Annyse's cross was overlaid, as opposed to the entire cross here. We have precedents (LoAR of 9 March 86) disallowing fimbriated ordinaries to be debruised by overall charges; that applies as strongly here. This must be returned for lack of identifiability.

Against the arms of Melton (Papworth 608), Azure, a cross patonce voided argent, we can certainly see granting a CD between a cross moline and a cross patonce. That, with the CD for the rose, brings this clear. 11/92

Eadric Gwyddon the Seeker. Device. Sable, on a bend sinister Or, four swords palewise sable.


This conflicts with the badge of Hermann Otto Koehlermann (SCA), Sable, a bend sinister Or; and with Herwegh (Woodward 134), Sable, a bend sinister Or. In each case there's a single CD, for the addition of the tertiary charges. 01/93

Eadwyn Inhold. Household name and badge for House Castor Bellator. (fieldless) A beaver sejant erect argent maintaining two oak leaves Or.


The household name is Latin for "warrior beaver". This doesn't follow our current guidelines for household names: we wouldn't register John the Warrior Beaver, so we shouldn't register this. It is barely possible that House of the Warrior Beaver might be a late-period English inn name -- but such a name wouldn't be in Latin. Pending documentation that this style of Latin house name was used in period, this must be returned.


The badge conflicts with the arms of Hübschmann von Biberbach (Siebmacher, plate 196): Gules, a beaver rampant argent. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for the held charges, and nothing for the posture. (The similarity between rampant and sejant erect would be more obvious if the submitter's beaver were drawn in a true heraldic style [cf. von Volborth's Heraldry: Customs, Rules and Styles, p.31], and not in the naturalistic style used here.) 09/92

Edward Menteith. Device. Or, a bend purpure between two dice vert, spotted argent, and a thistle bendwise purpure, slipped and leaved vert.


This conflicts with the arms of Traxler (Renesse): Or, a bend purpure. There's a single CD, for the addition of the secondary charge group. 9/93

Edward of Willowwood. Device. Per bend sinister argent and vert, a willow tree eradicated and a llama's head couped at the shoulders contourny counterchanged.


This conflicts with Eshton Spearcrafter, cited in the LOI: Per bend sinister argent and vert, an ash tree eradicated and a spearhead bendwise sinister counterchanged. In each device, the two charges form a single group of primaries. Changes are counted against the entire group: One cannot count a CD for a change to half a group, and another CD for the same category of change to the other half of the same group. Because both devices contain a tree, Rule X.2 does not apply; there is a single CD, for changing the types of charges of a single group. 07/92

Edward of Yarborough. Device. Per bend embattled gules and sable, an Egyptian sphinx rampant to sinister guardant ermine with a headdress Or.


The sphinx overlies the complex division between low-contrast colors, making it even harder to identify. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 09/92

Egill Gunnbjarnarson. Device. Sable, on a pale between two mullets of four points elongated to base argent, a pine tree eradicated proper, on a chief argent three reremice sable.


This is too complex. It has four tinctures and five types of charge, which exceeds our rule of thumb for complexity as outlined in Rule VIII.1.a. While this rule of thumb may be waived for a truly period design, the use of mullets of four points elongated to base prevents this from being considered such a design.


Lord Crux Australis has advocated renaming the mullet of four points (elongated to base or not) as a cross estoile. The cross estoile is indeed an heraldic charge, found in the arms of van Toulon, of Utrecht; but the earliest citation I've found for it is 19th Century. (I note that Rietstap, who cites van Toulon as his exemplar for the charge, blazons it une croix ètoilée (étoile à quatre rais) -- that is, even he gives mullet of four points as an alternate blazon for the charge!) Without evidence that the charge is period, I'm reluctant to start using its Victorian name -- particularly when our current usage is equally good (or bad). 10/92

Egill von Stahl. Household name for Egil's Nest.


This conflicts with Eagle's Nest, a place among the Killarney Lakes in County Kerry, Ireland. It is cited in a general reference (New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.I, p.1379), so it's important enough to protect. 08/92

Eileen O'Cronan. Device. Vert, a fess wavy and in chief an increscent argent.


This conflicts with Ragareu (Dictionnaire Heraldique): Vert, a fess wavy argent. There's a single CD for adding the charge in chief.


Against the badge of Eric Silverhart (Vert, in pale a sea-dragon naiant and a bar wavy argent), a check of the emblazon showed that a more accurate blazon would have been Vert, a sea-dragon naiant and in base a bar wavy argent; we readily apply Rule X.2 between it and the current submission. 11/92

Eirik Asvaldsson. Device. Per fess gules and Or, a wolf passant uluant argent and a mug bendwise sinister inverted, distilling a gout gules.


There are two problems with the submitted emblazon. The per fess line is below its proper location but too high to be considered a base. The wolf is emblazoned in too stylized a form to be identifiable as a wolf. A correctly drawn emblazon needs to be submitted for this to be acceptable. 9/93

Eirik Ising Steingrim. Device resubmission. Azure, on a bend engrailed between a cross formy fitched at the foot and a compass star Or, two skulls sable.


While the conflicts of the previous returns have now been resolved, the resubmission was drawn with small, "pinking-shear" engrailing on the bend. Medievally, complex lines of division were drawn boldly: a medieval bend engrailed would have about one-half or one-third the number of engrails as the bend drawn here, and the engrails would be correspondingly larger. This must be returned for non-period emblazonry; if he resubmits with a medieval engrailed line, it should be acceptable. 09/92

Eirikr Eyvindarson. Device. Sable, in pale an eagle volant affronty and a serpent fesswise contourny, nowed in three Stafford knots Or.


As drawn, the postures of the eagle and the snake make both completely unidentifiable. Volant affronty is not a recognizable posture; the closest heraldic equivalent is displayed. If the bird were drawn in that posture, this would conflict with Gayton (Papworth 304), Sable, an eagle displayed Or. 10/92

Eirikr Magnusson. Name.


The name conflicts with Erik II Magnusson, King of Norway c.1280. (Louda & Maclagan, Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, plate 24; Webster's New Biographical Dictionary, p.327) 09/92

Eirikr Sigurdharson. Badge. (fieldless) On an estoile of eight rays Or, a phoenix gules.


This was blazoned on the LOI as An estoile ... and overall a phoenix. However, an examination of the full-sized emblazon showed this to be incorrect: the "overlap" of the phoenix over the estoile's edge was so small as to be negligible. This in itself is reason for return: the Laurel office has long insisted that overall charges be truly overall, not barely overlapping the edge of their underlying charge. (LoAR of 17 June 83)


Visually, the phoenix is a tertiary charge here. Therefore, this conflicts with Erik von Kampfe (SCA), Sable, on an estoile Or a death's head gules; and with Bruce of Brandy Hall (SCA), Purpure, on a sun Or a dagger gules. In each case there's a CD for fieldlessness, but change of tertiary type alone does not garner a second CD; against Bruce, there's no difference between a sun and a multi-rayed estoile. 09/92

Elden the True. Household name and badge for House Shadowhawk. Per pale argent and sable, a hawk displayed maintaining in its talons a sword fesswise, between a roundel, a decrescent and an increscent, one and two, all counterchanged.


Under our current standards, the name conflicts with the Hawk Herald, of Calontir; the designator House/Herald being transparent, there is only the addition of an adjective, which is insufficient per Rule V.2. The badge conflicts with Penny (Papworth 302): Per pale argent and sable, an eagle displayed counterchanged. There's a single CD, for adding the secondary charges; neither the "held" charge nor the change from hawk to eagle is worth difference. 09/92

Elena Bentivogli. Device. Vert, on a heart argent, a lotus blossom in profile azure slipped and leaved vert.


This conflicts with Anna Gertrude Leonhardt (SCA): Azure, on a heart argent a lion rampant azure. There's a CD for the field; but by Rule X.4.j, the change of type alone of the tertiary charge is not enough for a second CD. The heart is not considered a "simple geometric charge" within the meaning of X.4.j.ii; and as the slipping and leaving of a flower is generally considered artistic license, its tincture doesn't contribute to difference. 08/92

Elena la Perdida de Cadiz. Device. Per pale purpure and argent, three quatrefoils and a chief nebuly counterchanged.


The line of division on the chief appears to be a cross between nebuly and wavy crested (the latter disallowed for SCA usage). Additionally, the nebules need to be larger. This needs to be returned for redrawing. 9/93

Eleonora Vittoria Alberti di Calabria. Badge resubmission. Per fess wavy barry wavy sable and argent and gules, in base a tower Or.


This conflicts with the badge of Edward II (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.96): (fieldless) A tower Or. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but we cannot grant difference for placement on the field against a fieldless badge. 12/92

Eleri Langdoun. Device. Argent, a pale dovetailed vert, overall a raven maintaining a chasing hammer argent hafted sable.


The device has two problems of identifiability. First, the argent chasing hammer has insufficient contrast with the argent field. While "held" charges are not held to the Rule of Contrast as strictly as most charges, they still may not share a tincture with the field. Second, the dovetailed line on the pale is too small to be visible from a distance -- a problem exacerbated by the overall charge obscuring the line. This must be returned.


While I would consider dovetailed to be negligibly different from embattled, I'd grant it a CD from urdy (champaine). This is therefore clear of Bowman (Papworth 1003), Argent, a pale champaine vert. 03/93

Eleri Rhiannon ferch Cian. Badge. (fieldless) On an escallop inverted argent, a spider azure.


This conflicts with the badge of Fia Naheed (SCA): (fieldless) On an escallop inverted argent, a compass star azure. The escallop is not a simple geometric charge, so the change of type alone of tertiary is worth no difference per Rule X.4.j.ii; the only CD is for fieldlessness. 09/92

Elgar of Stonehaven. Badge. (fieldless) A Maltese star cross argent.


As was stated in the return of the submitter's device (LoAR of Nov 92), a Maltese star cross is not acceptable for use in Society heraldry. While we can accept an SCA-variant charge (the star cross), we can't accept a variant of a variant.


Moreover, this conflicts with the badge of Clovia Lumi (SCA): Sable, a snowflake argent. The visual similarity between the Maltese star cross and a snowflake is too large to ignore. It also conflicts with the Mon of Kani (Hawley 53): Dark, six sets of arrow fletchings in annulo, points conjoined light. Again, the visual similarity is too great to permit a CD to be granted. 01/93

Elgar of Stonehaven. Household name for Stonehaven Keep.


This conflicts with the Shire of Stonehaven, in Calontir. 11/92

Elgar of Stonehaven. Device. Sable chaussé argent, on a torteau fimbriated a Maltese star cross argent.


While SCA-variant charges are often considered acceptable ("period-compatible", as it were), we draw the line at variants of SCA-variants. This submission is a case in point: the star-cross is a Society invention, unattested in medieval armory. While it's still acceptable for SCA use, variations of it are two steps removed from medieval armory, which is an unacceptably broad leap of faith. Without evidence of period compatibility, the Maltese star-cross is unacceptable.


Moreover, this conflicts with Guillaume au Sarpente d'Or (SCA), Argent, on a pile sable a serpent Or orbed gules; and with the arms of Laurie (Papworth 1024), Argent, on a pile sable a cup of the first, issuant therefrom two branches of laurel proper. We grant no difference between a charged pile and a chaussé field; there is at most a CD for the change of tertiary charges. 11/92

Eliada of Thun. Device resubmission. Azure, a fess wreathed Or and argent between two lotus blossoms in profile argent.


Her previous submission used a fess wreathed of a single metal, which was returned for insufficient contrast (among other reasons). The resubmission uses a fess wreathed of two metals -- which still has insufficient contrast, per Rule VIII.2.b.iv. A wreathed ordinary must be of two tinctures with good contrast. Making the Or parts gules would do the trick, assuming no conflicts. 09/92

Elspet NicDhubhghlaise bean Iain MhicThomaidh. Device. Azure, in annulo three cats couchant, each biting the tail of the next argent.


This conflicts with the arms of the Duke of Cassan, from Katherine Kurtz' Deryni series (Fabulous Heraldry #75): Azure, a lion dormant argent. There's a single CD, for adding the other two cats; we grant no difference between lions and cats, or between couchant and dormant.


This submission was an appeal of a return by the Midrealm College of Heralds, for the above conflict. The submitter argues that there should be a CD for posture as well as number, since the two added cats are not in their "default" posture -- by which is meant, we assume, not in the same posture as the original cat. I agree with Lord Dragon's analysis: the client evidently feels that the change from the Duke of Cassan's device to her submission is a two-step process (first we add two cats, then we change their posture). This is not the case. It's a single-step process: we've added two charges. They could have been two cats couchant [the whole in annulo] argent, or two cats rampant addorsed argent, or two bezants, or a widget ermine and a wadget checky Or and gules. The amount of difference gained remains the same: a single CD, for the added charges.


This policy has been in place since at least Master Wilhelm's tenure; it was enunciated by Master Baldwin, in his LoARs of 25 Aug 85, p.14, and 15 Sept 85, p.3; Mistress Alisoun and Master Da'ud both followed it. It is logically consistent with Laurel interpretations of the Rules to date. The policy has one strong advantage to commend it: it doesn't encourage our clients, through extra heraldic difference, to add charges at variance (by posture, type, tincture, whatever) from those of the base coat. Submissions get no more difference for such designs than for heraldically desirable designs, with all the charges identical. We may not be able to ban submissions with charges going every which way, but we certainly needn't reward them with extra CDs for the "every which way" part.


This is a valid conflict with the arms of the Duke of Cassan. It must be returned. The submitter might consider changing the tincture of the field. 7/93

Elspeth of Oxfordshire. Device. Per chevron embattled azure mullety of six points Or, and sable, in base a unicorn couchant regardant argent.


The low contrast between azure and sable renders the embattled line indistinguishable from any distance. As with the recent case of Per pale embattled purpure and sable (LoAR of Aug 92, p.25), I must return this for lack of identifiability, per Rule VIII.3.


Moreover, the unicorn on the full emblazon form was drawn as a unicornate horse, with neither lion's tail nor cloven hooves. Please have the submitter draw her unicorn correctly when she resubmits. 01/93

Elwin Dearborn. Device resubmission. Per chevron inverted argent and azure, three piles in point sable, the center pile charged with a decrescent argent.


As was pointed out in his previous return, piles are properly drawn throughout, or nearly so; they would not come to a point at the point of the field division, as here. If he drew this with the piles crossing the line of division, it would be acceptable; or he might try Argent chaussé azure, three piles in point sable, etc., (assuming no conflicts). 08/92

Elwyn of Vatavia. Device. Vert, on an eight-petalled flower Or a helm vert, on a chief embattled Or two shamrocks vert.


Neither the flower or the helm are drawn as recognizable heraldic charges. The flower isn't an octofoil, the standard heraldic eight-petalled flower; some commenters thought it looked more like a sun. Likewise, the helm isn't drawn as the standard heraldic barrel helm or tournament helm (and with that much open space in the face, we really don't see how it can be a Society-legal fighting helm, as Lord Hawk suggests). It's not really a Roman or Greek helm, lacking the characteristic plumes; indeed, it strongly resembles a Romulan helm from the old Star Trek television series.


This must be returned for redrawing, both of the helm and the primary charge. They must be drawn in an identifiable heraldic form when she resubmits. 06/93

Emrys Cador. Alternate persona name for Bron du yr Cigfran.


The submission lacks a given name. Bron is a common noun, "breast", not a given name. Moreover, the byname doesn't mean "of the raven", but "black (of) the raven"; even allowing for the nonsensical meaning, Cigfran should mutate to Gigfran following the definite article. Without knowing the submitter's exact intent, we can't suggest a correct form. 01/93

Enid of Crickhollow. Device. Azure, two mullets of six lesser and six greater points and a swan naiant within a bordure argent.


This conflicts with Iver of the Black Bow (reblazoned elsewhere in this LoAR): Azure, two estoiles and a unicorn's head cabossed, all within a bordure argent. Even granting difference between mullets and estoiles, I don't believe there is Substantial Difference as required by Rule X.2. There is thus a single CD, for type of primary charge group; we cannot grant a CD for type of half the group, and another CD for type of the other half of the same group. 09/92

Enniaun Llwyd o'r Coed. Device. Azure, two trees eradicated argent and a flame gules fimbriated Or charged with a double-horned anvil argent.


Though blazoned on the LOI as a flame proper, the charge in base is actually a flame gules fimbriated Or: a proper flame would be equally gules and Or, not mostly gules with a thin gold outline (as drawn here). Complex fimbriation is not permitted in Society armory.


Should he resubmit with this motif, please instruct the client to draw all the charges larger; among other benefits, this will help make clear that the flame and trees are a single group of primaries (not one primary with two secondaries in chief). He might also prefer an anvil enflamed, not a flame charged with an anvil; see the cover letter for a discussion on the distinction between the two. 06/93

Eoan na Belich. Name.


The byname doesn't seem to be a period form. The submitter's documentation (Innes of Learney, Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland) simply says: "In some parts of Argyllshire the Macmillans are known as Na Belich -- the Bells." But that doesn't make it necessarily acceptable for an individual Macmillan: Ewen the Bells makes as little sense in Gaelic as in English. None of the commenters suggested a grammatically correct form; pending such a form, or documentation of the submitted form, this must be returned. 12/92

Eoghan O'Neill. Device resubmission. Azure, in pale a pronghorn antelope's attire and a sun of eight points, all within a bordure argent.


There are three problems with the submission, each sufficient for return. The first is conflict, with the arms of Goethe (Woodward 308): Azure, a star of six points within a bordure argent. There's a CD for adding the attire, but not between a mullet of six points and the sun as drawn here.


The second is compatibility. The pronghorn antelope lives in the western United States; we have no evidence that it was known to period Europeans. Without such evidence, we cannot register the beast, or his attire.


The third is identifiability. None of the commenters could identify this as an attire, of any beast (let alone a pronghorn antelope). This might have been ameliorated, had there been evidence of European knowledge of the beast; without such evidence, the indistinguishability of the charge is enough to warrant return. 01/93

Eórann MagUidir. Name and device. Gules, a bend wavy argent between two quatrefoils Or.


The grammar of the name is incorrect; particularly for the old Irish form used here, Mag is a masculine particle, and cannot be used with the feminine name Eórann. The submitter had disallowed any grammatical corrections to her name.


The device conflicts with the arms of von Lauterbach (Siebmacher, plate 142): Gules, a bend wavy argent. There is a single CD, for adding the secondaries. 09/92

Erc Mortagh the Pict. Device. Per pale argent and azure, a spear and sword in saltire surmounted by an elk-horned mask per pale azure and argent.


The device has several problems. First, the use of three charges in a single group (colloquially known as "slot-machine heraldry") is prohibited by Rule VIII.1.a. Second, the spear and sword are obscured to the point of unidentifiability. Third, adding horns to inanimate objects doesn't appear to have been a period treatment; certainly, we would like to see some evidence of what is, at first glance, a highly improbable usage. And the reason for its improbability -- the fact that the elk-horned mask cannot be identified as such -- is a fourth problem, and probably the worst. Any of these problems is grounds for return. 08/92

Eric Alard. Device resubmission. Azure, on a bend between two mullets of four points pierced Or, three rustres azure.


This conflicts with Mete (Papworth 250): Azure, on a bend Or, three mascles gules. There's a CD for the addition of the secondaries. Rule X.4.j.ii requires substantial difference of tertiaries to earn a CD; we would not grant substantial difference between mascles and rustres. The only differences to these tertiaries are tincture and the exact type of voiding -- which may be considered the change of quaternary charges. These aren't enough to be granted a second CD. 09/92

Erich Küchengehilfe. Device. Per bend sinister vert and sable, a cleaver bendwise sinister argent.


As drawn, the charge was not identifiable as a cleaver. Various guesses, by commenters and Laurel's staff, included crescent wrench, half-eaten ice cream stick, plastic oil can, and a spout from a gasoline hose. If it can't be identified, it can't be used as an heraldic charge.


Most of the cleavers shown in period documents (including Jost Amman's Ständebuch, cited in the LOI) have a massive, square blade. The sole exception was the submitter's source, Workers in the Mendel Housebook by the Nuremburg Masters, c.1436: it showed a cleaver similar (though not identical) to that in this submission. However, the documented cleaver had a proportionately broader blade, with a smaller notch, than the submitted emblazon; and we note that even a misshapen cleaver is more readily identified when shown in a butcher's hand, in the process of hacking meat.


We suggest the submitter use a more standard form of cleaver when he resubmits. If drawn in a recognizable style, this would be an excellent device. 05/93

Ericus the Silverhand. Household name for House Bladesong (appeal).


The household name was first returned Nov 91: "No evidence was presented that the household name is formed in a period manner or follows period naming practice." The submitter's appeal was based on a quote from Bardsley's English Surnames, describing "names of simple relationship or occupation or office, or even, we may add, of patronymic character, having been compounded with adjectives expressive of the feeling of those with whom the nominee had to deal..." The submitter then cited the OE nouns blaed "blade" and sang "song", and argued that, given such documented names as Blaedwine, Blaedsang -- and hence Bladesong -- should be acceptable.


The argument based on Bardsley has two serious flaws. First, the compound names described in English Surnames are of the form [adjective] + [noun]: Littlejohn, Goodknave, Beauclerk, Longfellow, Fairchild. Neither blade nor song is an adjective, according to the OED; so Bardsley's examples do not support this name.


Second, Bladesong does not seem to qualify as any of the categories mentioned by Bardsley; it is neither a name of relationship, occupation, office, nor a patronymic. On that basis alone, the Bardsley quote is irrelevant.


The example of the Saxon given name Blaedwine (and others, such as Blaedbeorth, Blaedswith, and Blaedhild) is likewise flawed. Anglo-Saxon names weren't formed from randomly chosen words, but from a smaller group of name elements called themes. If the submitter had documented -sang (-song) as such a theme, then Blaedsang would be a valid Anglo-Saxon given name -- and by our guidelines on household names (outlined in the LoAR cover letter of 2 July 92), acceptable as a household name. But the compound of two unrelated nouns is not a name, nor even necessarily a valid Anglo-Saxon construction.


Our rule-of-thumb for SCA household names is that, if John X is acceptable, then House X should be acceptable. We would not accept John Bladesong as a personal name; the epithet would be too fantasy-oriented. We cannot accept House Bladesong, for the same reason. At the very least, we need evidence that a bladesong is a valid period concept -- for instance, some mention of "singing swords" in period literature (as opposed to modern fantasy literature). Without any real evidence in support of the name, it must again be returned. 09/92

Erik the Runt. Device. Gules, a longship sailing to sinister and in base two swords in saltire Or.


This conflicts with O'Donnel, cited in the LOI (Papworth 1089): Gules, a galley, her oars in action Or. There is a CD for the swords, but we have hitherto granted no difference for type of ship; and as a longship is so nearly symmetric, reversing it cannot count as a second CD. 06/92

Erik the Tall. Name.


This directly conflicts with the name of Erik the Tall, registered Sept 90. The armory was registered under the holding name Erik of Saint Katherine's College. 09/92

Eriu Morgana Nic Dhubhghlaise Crawford. Name and device. Argent, in pale a swan naiant wings elevated and addorsed neck nowed sable and a whip nowed gules.


Eriu is both the name of a country (Ireland) and a goddess. We cannot register this without more definite evidence that this name was used by humans in period. She might consider the given name Eórann.


The nowing of the whip renders it unidentifiable. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. We would also like to see some documentation for the nowing of the bird's neck. 10/92

Etheldred NicEoghainn. Badge. (fieldless) A mullet checky sable and argent.


Conflicts with the badge of Eleanor Leonard (SCA), (tinctureless) A mullet of four points distilling a gout, and the seal of James IV of Scotland (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges), (tinctureless) A mullet. There is only the CD, for fieldlessness; we grant no difference for number of points on the mullet in this case. 10/93

Etheldred NicEoghainn. Device. Azure, a chevron checky argent and sable between two mullets and a fox's mask argent.


This conflicts with the arms of William Brown of Horton Place (Lyon Orindary #1): Azure, a chevron chequey argent and sable between three fleurs-de-lys argent. There's a single CD, for type of secondary charges. 09/92

Etienne Michel de Calais. Household name and badge for House of the Tarnished Pheon. (fieldless) A pheon vert.


The name conflicts with the East Kingdom's Order of the Pheon: the designator is transparent, and the addition of the adjective insufficient per Rule V.2. The badge conflicts with the English Royal badge: A broadarrow. The Royal badge is genuinely tinctureless, so there's a CD for fieldlessness; but per X.4.d, the second necessary CD must come from a category that does not involve tincture. Pheon vs. broadarrow is an artistic distinction, not an heraldic difference. 08/92

Eugene Philip Boucher. Device. Sable, a pair of bat wings conjoined and displayed Or, surmounted by a flame inverted proper, a bordure Or.


The charges aren't particularly identifiable when conjoined in this manner. Specifically, the inverted flame, itself difficult to identify, has its Or outline mostly abutting the Or wings. We'd suggest deleting the flame, assuming no conflicts. 7/93

Evan Hardrada. Device. Per pale gules and argent, a drakkar counterchanged.


This conflicts with the device of the Stronghold of Klakavirki (SCA): Per pale gules and argent, in pale a drakkar and a laurel wreath counterchanged. There's a single CD for deleting the laurel wreath. It also conflicts with Aoki (Hawley 68): Dark, a ship light. There's a single CD, for tincturelessness. 10/93

Evzenie Apolena Vitkovic. Device. Argent, a lion rampant queue fourchy sable between six roses in annulo proper, a chief lozengy gules and Or.


Device conflicts with Lowde (Papworth 103), Argent, a lion rampant sable, a chief lozengy Or and gules, with one CD for the addition of the roses. It also conflicts with Pierpont (Papworth 130), Argent, a lion rampant sable within an orle of roses gules, and with the related arms of Perpound (Papworth 131), Argent, a lion rampant sable between six cinquefoils gules. In each case there's a CD for the addition of the chief. In the case of of Pierpont, there's no difference for number of roses; in the case of Perpound, no difference for type of flowers. In both cases, moving the flowers from in orle or 3, 2, 1 to in annulo requires moving only two flowers. As that's less than half the group, the change yields no difference. 10/93

Fáelán MacFergus. Device. Quarterly sable, and checky Or and gules, in bend two wolves' heads erased contourny argent.


It has been previously ruled (LoAR of Oct 92, p.30) that the use of a complex field in two quarters of a quartered design gives too strong an appearance of marshalling. This is true whether or not those quarters are charged; their complexity gives them the appearance of independent armory, which Rule XI.3.b prohibits. This must be returned for redesign.

When the gentle resubmits, please ask him to draw the wolves' heads correctly erased: with bold, jagged edges. 01/93

Faoiltigearna ni Domhnallain. Name resubmission.


Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 7/93

Faustina von Schwarzwald. Badge. (fieldless) A demi-reremouse displayed and sinister facing Or issuant from a joscelyn fesswise argent and sable, belled Or.


The College does not register crests (LoAR of 20 Sept 81), partially to avoid having to decide who may or may not be entitled to them, and partially to save ourselves work. This submission is a crest by virtue of its being set atop a torse. (A joscelyn is simply a torse with bells added. On a "joscelyn fesswise", those bells are invisible, and count for nothing.) The submitter may certainly register a standard fieldless badge, which she may use as she pleases; but we cannot register this crest. 03/93

Fearghus MacCulloch. Device change. Per pale gules and azure, a stag's head erased affronty and a bordure embattled argent.


The bordure, and its embattlements, are drawn far too small to be visible from any distance. This was true when his current device was registered, on the LoAR of Aug 89; the submitter was specifically instructed to "draw the bordure wider", end quote. He has ignored that instruction in this resubmission; but since Aug 89 we've gotten stricter about complex lines, insisting they be drawn to be seen. Given the explicit instruction on his previous submission, we're not inclined to be lenient for the current submission.


Please instruct the submitter to draw his bordure correctly. If he does so, he should have no problems when he resubmits. 01/93

Feargus MacBruce. Badge. Azure, three thistles conjoined in pile and pendant on a thread therefrom a spider Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Chardon (Dictionnaire Heraldique): Azure, three thistles Or. There's a single CD, for the arrangement of the charges; the spider and thread are too small to be worth difference.


It also conflicts with the device of Orianna la Fleur de Bruse (SCA): Azure, a thistle bendwise sinister Or. (This was registered Nov 89; through a clerical error, it's listed in the Armorial, but not the Ordinary.) There's a CD for adding the other two thistles, but again nothing for the "dependant" charge.


Several of the commenters noted the strong allusion to the story of Robert Bruce and the spider. The allusion appears to be intentional in light of the submitter's registered device, which is based on the arms of Bruce. While allusion isn't necessarily presumption, there's a fine line between the two, and the submitter would be well advised to avoid crossing it when he resubmits. 10/92

Federico Arcière dal Fióre. Device. Sable, two arrows in saltire, on a chief argent three roses sable.


The arrows were drawn with barely perceptible points and fletching. Charges must be drawn in their period form (per Rule VII.3), so that they can be identified (per Rule VIII.3). This is especially true when a wrongly drawn charge can be mistaken for some other charge. See the cover letter for a more complete discussion of this issue.


In the case of arrows, if they're not drawn with prominent points and fletching, they become indistinguishable from any other long, skinny charges. As such, this conflicts with Isabeau Jehane (SCA): Sable, two needles inverted in saltire argent threaded Or and on a chief argent three garbs sable. There's one CD for type of tertiaries on the chief, but not another for type of unidentifiable long skinny primaries.


If this is resubmitted with correctly drawn arrows, both the style problem and the cited conflict should disappear. 07/92

Federico Arcière dal Fióre. Badge. Two arrows in saltire argent surmounted by a rose sable.


As with the submitter's device, the arrows were drawn in an unrecognizable, non-period manner, with miniscule points and fletching. If we wish to make the period distinction, we must insist on the period rendition. While there's no immediate conflict with the badge, as there was with the device, the arrows must still be correctly drawn; did it pass, future submissions would be judged against it. 07/92

Fergus Fitzalan. Badge. Gules, on a tower argent a mullet of eight points vert, all within a bordure argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Manfried von Falkenmond (SCA): Gules, perched atop a tower a hooded falcon, within a bordure argent. There's a CD for the tertiary charge, but comparing the emblazons shows Manfried's falcon to be worth no more than a "maintained" charge. It isn't prominent enough for a second CD. 09/92

Fernando Juan Carlos Remesal. Device. Argent, in pale a peacock in his pride purpure, pavanated proper, and a rapier and a lute in saltire gules.


This is a single group of primaries, of three different types, which violates Rule VIII.1.a. Additionally, the "rapier" is drawn as a modern fencing foil, which has been reason for return ere now (LoAR of Sept 92, p.50).


Finally, though the peacock was blazoned proper on the LOI, its body was tinctured purpure. (Peacocks proper have green bodies.) With five tinctures and three types of charge, this pushed the edge of acceptable complexity. 10/92

Fiacha Suileach. Badge. Per pale azure and purpure, a trilithon argent.


Conflicts with Cadwalladyr Stone of Stonecroft (SCA), Vert, a dolmen of three uprights capped by two lintels argent. Just as there is no difference between a tower and a castle, there is no difference between trilithons and "pentalithons".


Moreover, there was no archive copy included with this submission; had there been no other problems, it would still have been pended. 01/93

Fiachra ni Ciardhubhain. Device change. Azure, on a bend between two groups of four fleurs-de-lys in cross points outward Or, three roses proper.


Device conflicts with Wayd (Papworth 240), Azure, on a bend Or, two roses gules, stalked and leaved vert, and Challenge (Papworth 241), Azure, on a bend Or three 5-foils of the first. There is only one CD for the addition of the secondaries, and nothing for the changes to the tertiaries. 10/93

Finis Terrae, Shire of. Name and device. Vert, in cross a laurel wreath between four horse's heads couped Or.


The name conflicts with Finisterre, or Finistère, the westernmost portion of France, at the very tip of Brittany. Its name derives from finis terrae, "land's end". As it's cited in general references (1911 E.Brit., vol.X, p.382), Finisterre is important enough to protect.


The device appears acceptable, but cannot be registered without a name. 12/92

Fiona Flamehair. Name.


We have in the past returned such epithets as Fyrlocc, on the grounds that they didn't follow known period models for English bynames. However, given the recent documentation of Pyrsokomos "flame-hair" as a valid Greek epithet, we are now inclined to permit its lingua franca translation -- but only for names where the original Greek epithet would be acceptable. The submitter will have to demonstrate regular period interaction between Ireland and Greece before this name meets that criterion -- or else show the construction follows period English models. 05/93

Fiona nic Ferrall O'Cahan. Device. Vert, a dance ermine between a crescent pendant and a winged bear statant Or, a bordure ermine.


The charge in base was completely unidentifiable as a bear. This may have been due to the wings, the lack of internal detailing, the misshapen proportions (it looked more like a hedgehog to most of my staff), the small size (not drawn to fill the available space), or a combination of these. Please have the submitter redraw this so that the bear can be identified as a bear ... and also draw the bordure and dance wider. 09/92

Fionn Ban MacAoidh. Household name for Clann nan Eala.


Conflicts with the Barony of Aneala, in Lochac. The designator (Clann, Barony) is transparent, counting for no difference per Rule V.4.d; and both names are derived from the Irish for "of the swans". 11/92

Fionna Goodburne. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A thistle slipped and leaved per chevron throughout purpure and vert.


The division of the thistle could not be identified as such by the heralds at Laurel's meeting. On such an irregular shape as a thistle, any division must be exceptionally simple to be recognized. Per pale might have been acceptable; Per chevron, where the line must cross the empty space between the leaves and the blossom, is not.


The previous badge submission (A thistle purpure) was returned Feb 92 for conflict with the badge of Clan Stewart (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.146): A thistle [proper]. At the time, it was assumed that the Stewart badge was tinctureless. However, in blazoning the Scots plant badges, Fox-Davies did not account for their most common use: as sprigs actually worn on the person. This makes the Scots plant badges' coloration proper in correct usage. The original submission was therefore returned in error; she might consider resubmitting it. 12/92

Fiska-Silvester Lotharssohn. Device. Per fess sable and argent, a codfish naiant and a domestic cat passant counterchanged.


This conflicts with Payne (Papworth 149): Per fess sable and argent, two lions passant counterchanged, armed and langued gules. There is only one CD, for changing a feline to a fish. 06/92

Flintheath, Shire of. Badge. (fieldless) A furison argent.


This badge conflicts with Sprecher: Azure, a furison argent (Rietstap). There is only once CD for fieldlessness. Additionally, the lack of an archive copy is also grounds for returning this submission. 9/93

Fortes Souris, Stronghold des. Name and device. Gules, on a fess wavy between two mice rampant addorsed, tails entwined argent and a laurel wreath Or, a bar wavy azure.


The name is French for "Stronghold of the Strong Mice", which doesn't fit any exemplar for period placenames of which we're aware. At the very least, some evidence of period compatibility is required before this can be registered.


The device looks acceptable, but it cannot be registered without a branch name. Moreover, while we received a petition of support for the name, we received none for the device. 12/92

Franz Joder von Joderhübel. Badge. (fieldless) On a flame gules a lyre argent.


Conflicts with Reginleif the Unruly (SCA), Sable, on a flame gules fimbriated Or, a rough-legged draft horse forceny argent; and with Grimm the Hele-Bourne (SCA), Sable, upon a flame gules fimbriated Or, a skull argent. A check of the emblazons showed these blazons to be accurate; so there's a single CD, for fieldlessness. Per Rule X.4.j.ii, change of type of tertiary charge doesn't earn another CD in this case. 12/92

Friedrich von Rabenstein. Device. Gules, on a sun Or a raven displayed sable, a mountain argent.


The submission has several conflicts. The closest is the device of Leifr Johansson (SCA), Gules, on a sun Or an eagle displayed azure, a bordure argent. There's a CD for changing the bordure to a mount, but nothing for the change of only the tincture of the tertiary bird. (Though blazoned as a raven on the LOI, it's drawn indistinguishably from a hawk displayed.)


It also conflicts with the device of Seth the Seeker (SCA), Gules on a compass star throughout Or a unicorn's head couped at the shoulder sable armed and crined gules. There's a CD for the addition of the mount, but no difference between suns and multi-pointed mullets -- which includes compass stars. 06/93

Frithiof Sigvardsson Skägge. Device. Gyronny argent and vert, an orle embattled on the outer edge sable.


This conflicts with the arms of Stocker (Papworth 899): Gyronny of six argent and vert. The orle is considered a peripheral charge (LoAR of Aug 92, p.29), so its addition does not invoke Rule X.1. We grant no difference between Gyronny of six and Gyronny of eight, any more than we would for barry or bendy of those numbers. 05/93

Fujiyama Takamori. Device. Per chevron argent and purpure, in chief a torteau.


This conflicts with Torin of Hyrcania (SCA): Gyronny argent and sable, in chief a torteau. There's a single CD, for the field. It also conflicts with that division of the U.S. I Corps that bore (fieldless) A torteau. (MilOrd #1129)


Against the flag of Japan (Argent, a torteau), I count a CD for the field and a CD for the non-forced move of the roundel to chief. 07/92

Gabhan MacDhomhnuill. Name.


This conflicts with the name of Gavin MacDhomhnuill, registered June 91. 09/92

Gabriella Allegra Palumbo O'Loingsigh. Name.


Returned for excessive length and grammatical problems. The LoI spelled the patronymic without the first G, which however is on the forms and does match that of her husband, Galen O'Loingsigh, (name reg. Aug 92). By the Grandfather Clause, she may use O'Loingsigh, though it appears to be ungrammatical; but it must still be used in a valid construction. One such construction would be to add the particle bean, "lady of", before her husband's surname O'Loingsigh. (She could also replace O' with a feminine patronymic particle, although that would make her Galen's sister.) The current construction, however, has not been shown to be valid. Added to the unorthodox length of the name (we suggest she drop one of the interior names), the whole name has too many problems to allow its registration. We are returning it for consultation.


There was some question of Gaelic-Italian interaction in period, but note that St. Columbanus of Ireland (b. Leinster, 543 AD) founded his last monastery in Bobbio, in the foothills of the Apennine mountains of Italy, bringing Christianity to the heathens living there. See the cover letter for a discussion of married names. 10/93

Gabrielle Antoinette Dubois. Name and device. Per saltire argent and gules, in pale a mask of comedy and a mask of tragedy joined in bend and a pine tree couped, a bordure indented sable.


The indentations on the bordure are too small to be identified from a distance. This must be returned for redrawing, per Rule VIII.3. Should she resubmit with theatrical masks, please instruct her to separate the charges, not have them overlap; they should be distinct charges, to aid identifiability. 03/93

Gaius Sempronius Gracchus. Name.


This is an exact conflict with Gaius Sempronius Gracchus, a Roman tribune of the 2nd century BC. He is listed in several general references ('64 E.Brit., vol.10, p.648; New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.II, p.1802), so he's important enough to protect. 01/93

Galen MacDonald. Device resubmission. Gyronny azure and argent, an orle counterchanged.


This conflicts with the arms of Bryanson (Papworth 899): Gyronny of eight azure and argent. The orle, as a peripheral ordinary, is by definition not a primary charge; Rule X.1 cannot be invoked here. There's a single CD for adding the orle. 08/92

Galen O'Loingsigh. Device. Per fess azure and vert, a sea-serpent ondoyant and a point pointed argent, in sinister chief a rivenstar Or.


The commentary was strongly in favor of disallowing the rivenstar (save only to the Barony of Rivenstar, to whom it would be grandfathered), as a non-period charge. Lord Pale suggested that the charge continue to be permitted, for the sake of residents of Rivenstar who wished to show their allegiance in their armory. This suggestion would carry more weight if some Rivenstarites had ever actually registered armory with rivenstars; but according to Lord Morsulus, except for the armory of the Barony there's only one SCA registration of a rivenstar. Consequently, we have no qualms about disallowing the charge, pending evidence that it's period, or at least formed in a period manner. This must therefore be returned; he might consider replacing the rivenstar with a sun or a mullet. 08/92

Gareth Shieldbane. Device. Sable, a skull argent, vested of a jester's cap Or.


This is returned for visual conflict with the arms of Morley (Papworth 911): Sable, a leopard's head argent jessant-de-lys Or. The jester's cap is split in three points, looking much like a fleur-de-lys. It's also visually close to the arms of Amat le bel Josteur (Fabulous Heraldry, #421): Sable, a woman's head couped proper crined Or.


Achbar ibn Ali has written a letter of permission to conflict against his badge (A skull argent, within the dexter eye socket a rose gules), so that problem at least does not arise. 09/92

Garrett Logan Toddhunter. Device. Per pale azure and gules, a ram's head couped affronty Or.


This conflicts with Perrot de Traonvilin (Rietstap): Sable, a ram's head cabossed Or. There's a single CD, for the field. 03/93

Garrett of Vanished Wood. Device. Quarterly vert and argent, embedded in a tree stump eradicated proper a double-bitted axe argent hafted of wood proper, on a chief azure four mullets of eight points argent.


Half of the argent axe blade is on argent, in violation of our Rule of Contrast. This should be resubmitted with a different tincture of axe, and preferably with less use of proper. When he resubmits, instruct him to draw the chief broader. 01/93

Gavin Gamelson. Device. Gyronny gules and Or, a griffin's head erased and sinister facing proper.


There is no defined "proper" coloration for a griffin. Please have the client resubmit using an honest heraldic tincture for the griffin's head. 10/93

Gawain Blackthorne. Device. Chevronelly and per pale Or and sable, in sinister chief a lion rampant argent.

This conflicts with the badge of John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk: A lion rampant argent. (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.128) There's a CD, for fieldlessness; but one can't grant difference for placement on the field against a fieldless badge. 09/92

Geeraert av København. Device. Per bend sinister Or and sable, a triskelion of scythes within an annulet counterchanged.


According to Lord Pale (now Lord Dragon), this motif -- essentially a triskelion gammadion within an annulet -- is the logo of the Afrikaaner Weerstandsbeweging, a pro-apartheid white supremacist group in South Africa. The triskelion gammadion has been used by white supremacists before this: it was the ensign of the Nazi SS's "volunteer" division in Belgium, during WWII. ("Hateful Heraldry", Vuong Manh, in the Caerthan Symposium Proceedings) While the Nazis' use of the symbol doesn't necessarily poison it for our use, the fact that modern racists still use it as their logo suggests it has acquired a permanent symbolism, one that's offensive to many people. The triskelion gammadion, and its variants (such as the triskelion gammadion in annulo, or the current submission's triskelion of scythes) must therefore be disallowed, per Rule IX.4. 09/92

Genevieve de Mowbray of Lion's Rest. Badge appeal. (fieldless) A torch sable.


This badge had been returned on the LoAR of May 92 for conflict with the badge of the Barony of the Flaming Gryphon (SCA): Ermine, a torch sable enflamed proper. The submitter has appealed that return, arguing there should be a CD for fieldlessness and a CD for tincture of "half the charge" (the flame). As examples, she cites instances where changing half the tincture of a charge -- e.g. the tail of a sea-monster -- was ruled to be worth a CD.


Unfortunately, the submitter's examples do not prove her point. We certainly agree that the tincture of half the charge can be worth a CD; that was not at issue. The question was whether the flame of a torch constitutes half the charge, and this she has failed to demonstrate. The badge's previous return specifically ruled that "the flames [of the torch] do not 'constitute half the charge' as stated in the LOI, so changing their tincture does not count for the second CD." I agree with that ruling: as normally drawn, a torch's flame is a small fraction of the entire torch, not half. Indeed, the emblazon of Flaming Gryphon's badge (for their Order of the Flaming Brand) clearly shows a torch much longer than the flame is high. We suggest she write to the Barony for permission to conflict. 7/93

Genevieve Marie Etiennette de Montagne. Device. Per chevron purpure nd vert, two hummingbirds rising respectant, wings addorsed, and a decrescent Or.


The hummingbirds are drawn in trian aspect, which has been disallowed for many years. Please have her draw these in a more heraldic posture. 01/93

Geneviève Cordelia d'Outremer. Device. Argent chapé vert scaly argent, four mascles in cross gules.


This was blazoned on the LOI (with minor corrections) as Vert scaly argent, on a pile inverted throughout argent, four mascles in cross gules. It's just as easily blazonable as a chapé field, however, and indeed the mascles are more likely to be perceived as primary charges here. Under that blazon, this conflicts with the arms of Tindall (Papworth 975), Or, five mascles in cross gules. There's a CD for the field, but nothing for the addition of the fifth mascle (since their relative placement is unchanged, and no difference is granted for 4 vs. 5, per Rule X.4.f). 9/93

Geneviève Duplessis. Device. Ermine, three bunches of grapes purpure slipped and leaved vert.


Conflicts with Brun, Marquis de la Roche (Rietstap): D'or à trois grappes de raisins au naturel (Or, three grape bunches slipped and leaved proper.) There's a lone CD, for the field. 12/92

Geoffrey FitzGalen. Badge. (fieldless) A cross patonce sable surmounted by a griffin's head erased Or collared sable.


The overall charge unacceptably obscures the cross patonce, to the point where identifiability is marginal. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. This will be true for the majority of fieldless badges with overall charges.


The tincture of the cross was omitted from the LOI's blazon; the badge would normally be pended, but its stylistic problems are grounds for return regardless of the tinctures.

As for the procedural question posed in the LOI, the proposed ban on overall charges was announced five months in advance, precisely to allow Principal Heralds to catch unacceptable submissions before they were sent to Laurel. This submission was not "in the pipeline" when the ban was announced, as far as the College of Arms is concerned. 01/93

Geoffroi de la Marche. Device change. Gules, on a fess between three crosses crosslet fitchy argent, three towers sable.


This conflicts with Pearche (Papworth 745): Gules, a fess between three crosses botonny argent. There's a CD for the addition of the tertiaries on the fess, but no difference for fitching the crosses, and no difference for crosslet vs. botonny. 09/92

Georg of Glacier's Edge. Badge. (fieldless) A massacre gules.


This conflicts, alas, with the arms of Borsinger (Rietstap): D'argent à une ramure de cerf de gueules (Argent, a deer's massacre gules). There's a single CD, for the field. 06/93

Gerard Casteleyn. Device. Per pale gules and argent, a castle within a bordure embattled counterchanged.


This conflicts, alas, with the mundane arms of Vismara (Rietstap): Parti de gueules et d'argent à une château sommé de deux tours, de l'un en l'autre, ouvert et ajouré du champ (Per pale gules and argent, a castle of two towers counterchanged, portal and windows of the field). There's a single CD, for the bordure. 06/93

Gernot von der Felchmühle. Device. Gules, on a bend wavy Or three roses gules.


The device has multiple conflicts. It conflicts with Berthorpe (Dictionary of British Arms, p.360), Gules, a bend wavy Or, with a CD for adding the tertiaries. It also conflicts with Denis de Rioncay (Dictionnaire Heraldique), Gules, on a bend Or three roses gules, with a CD for the line of the bend. Finally, it conflicts with Glagge (Papworth 242), Gules, on a bend Or three cinquefoils of the first, with a CD for the line of the bend but no difference for type of tertiaries. 11/92

Gerome of Heyswyndon. Device. Per bend gules and purpure, a dragon couchant contourny, saddled and wings displayed argent, maintaining in its forepaws a harp, in chief a flute fesswise Or.


There are two problems with the submission. First, the dragon is not in an heraldic posture: it isn't truly couchant, but closer to couchant bendwise sinister [sic]; and its wings aren't truly displayed (since the tops, not the undersides, are shown). The dragon needs to be redrawn in a standard heraldic posture.

Second, this contains too many references to Pern, the world of Anne McCaffrey's Dragonrider series. Pern has a technology advanced well beyond that compatible with the SCA's period. The white dragon, saddled for a dragonrider, with the symbols of the Harper Hall, all combine to form an inescapable Pernish reference. 03/93

Gerrich de la Foy. Device. Or, a gopher rampant and on a chief vert, a chalice between two Latin crosses Or.


We have no evidence that the gopher was known to period Europeans: the OED, for instance, dates gopher in this context only to 1818. (There's also the Biblical gopher-wood, but that doesn't apply to this submission.) Since the gopher is a rodent from the North American plains, we can't automatically assume that it was known to period Europeans; we need some hard evidence before we can accept the charge. 03/93

Gillian de la Luz. Device. Sable, a rivenstar argent and a bordure ermine.


The rivenstar was disallowed as a charge on the LoAR of Aug 92 (except for submissions from the Barony of Rivenstar, due to the Grandfather Clause).


Moreover, this conflicts with Ingleby (Papworth 991): Sable, a mullet of six points argent within a bordure Or. There's a CD for the tincture of the bordure, but none for six-pointed mullet vs. rivenstar. A similar point count brings this into conflict with Alexandra of Elentil (SCA): Sable, a mullet of eight points argent, a bordure gules fimbriated argent. 04/93

Gillian von dem Walde. Device resubmission. Plumetty gules and argent, three swans rousant, wings addorsed sable, each holding in its beak an annulet Or.


Her previous submission, with a single bird, was returned Aug 86 for conflict with the Principality of Cynagua. Increasing the number of swans removes that conflict, but introduces another. This now conflicts with the arms of Folgnardby (Papworth 330): Argent, three swans rising sable. There's a single CD, for the field; the annulets, as "held" charges, contribute no difference. 7/93

Ginevra Cecilia da Firenze. Device. Or, a lion's head azure jessant-de-lys vert.


This conflicts with Terell (Papworth 911): Or, a leopard's head jessant-de-lys gules. After much thought, we decided that the leopard's head jessant-de-lys was common enough in period armory to be considered a single charge, in the same way a penner and inkhorn would be. It could equally well be considered a single group of conjoined charges. Either way, there's a single CD, for the tincture of the primary charge group. 10/92

Giuliana Audaci. Device. Pily bendy wavy sable and argent.


This conflicts with the arms of de la Warde (Papworth 56), Barry wavy sable and argent; and of Plater (Papworth 291), Bendy wavy of six argent and sable. In each case, there's a CD for the field division, but no more; there would have to be a change in tincture or complex line for the second necessary CD. 03/93

Giuliano Roberto Francesco Arrieta della Beleari. Name.


It's been previously ruled (Marco Giovanni Drago Bianco Venti, Sept 92) that the use of five name elements is excessive for Italian names; the longest period name yet cited (Giovan Francesco Palladio della Olivi, 16th Century) has only four elements. Pending evidence that five-element names are acceptable, this must be returned. 01/93

Godfrey of Huntington. Device. Per pale Or and sable, a griffin segreant counterchanged.


Device withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 03/93

Golden Sea, Shire of. Name.


No evidence of populace support was included with this submission. We usually require a petition, or something equally representative of the popular sentiment, before we register branch names. 07/92

Gráinne of Starmount. Device. Per pale and per chevron purpure and argent, three roses counterchanged.

Visual conflict with the badge of Kostbera Ulfsdottir (SCA): Per pale and per chevron azure and argent, three roses counterchanged. Though we concede sufficient technical difference, the consensus of those at the Laurel meeting was that the two were too similar. Some attributed it to the similarity of blue and purple, others to the identical complex patterns of light and dark; but all agreed that the visual similarity overrode the CDs for field and charge tincture. 01/93

Gregorio dello Falco. Name and device. Per chevron pean and vert, in base a boar's head contourny couped close Or.


The grammatically correct version is del Falco. Unlike Christiana dello Falco, also on this letter, this submitter is apparently not a blood relation to Tancred dello Falco and so the Grandfather Clause does not apply. He permits neither changes nor a holding name, so this must be returned as must the device. On any future submissions of the device it should be more clear whether this is a per chevron line or a charged point pointed. 9/93

Gregorius Hlaehtorunhold. Name.


Hlaehtorunhold doesn't seem to follow any known period pattern for Old English bynames. It was stated to mean "laughter not in the proper order of the world"; but that is neither a reasonable epithet, nor the actual meaning of this byname. It seems to be simply a portmanteau word combining the Old English for "laughter", negation, and "gracious", which makes it a questionable construction. Given Lord Palimpsest's citations of beadurôf "battle-bold" and dômgeorn "glory-eager", this byname might possibly be stretched to mean "laughter-disliking" -- but that's a far leap to make without more solid documentation. 03/93

Gregory the Disgusting. Name.


Disgusting doesn't appear to be a period term; the OED first cites the use of the present participle in 1754. He might consider one of the examples offered by Lord Green Anchor: Skamful, Nutemuch, Geake, or le Spewere. The device has been registered under the holding name Gregory of Parvus Portus. 09/92

Grethfurth Wulfstan. Device resubmission. Sable, a bend sinister argent, overall a wolf's head caboshed, grasping in its mouth an arrow fesswise reversed counterchanged, a bordure embattled argent.


The counterchanging of the complex charges over the ordinary is visually confusing, and disallowed per Rule VIII.3. This interpretation has been in force since April 90; it was most recently reaffirmed in the case of the Shire of Blackmoor Keep, LoAR of Oct 92.


This submission is an appeal of a return by the Atlantian College of Heralds. The submitter has been informed of the abovementioned policy; his appeal is based on two period examples, each showing a lion counterchanged over an ordinary. One example, from King René's Tournament Book, mid-15th Century, seems to have been invented for illustration purposes; while it might be argued to be acceptable style (by its inclusion in the book), it might also be argued to be obviously nonsensical style (to show that it's not real armory). King René's illustration is therefore inconclusive evidence.


The other example is a device found in the Mandeville Roll, c.1450 (DBA 218): Azure, a lion argent and a bend counterchanged. No owner was named for this armory; we might reasonably assume it to have been an actual coat, but it's a weak example on which to overturn our present policy.


Moreover, the current submission isn't of comparable simplicity to the example in the Mandeville Roll. The latter had a single ordinary, with a single counterchanged charge. The current submission has two counterchanged charges plus an additional bordure, increasing its visual complexity. (We also note that the bend surmounts the bordure, which is a further anomaly. It isn't reason for return in this case; as both the bend and bordure are argent, they'll tend to blend together in any case. However, should he resubmit with this motif, please instruct the submitter to have the bordure surmount the bend.)


To sum up: by longstanding policy, the College disallows complex charges counterchanged over other charges. The examples given in this appeal don't apply to this case: the submitted device has more counterchanged charges than the examples, and an anomalous bordure as well. Even were the submission as simple as the examples, the latter are too nebulous (neither being attributable to a specific historical person) to warrant overturning our policy. This must be returned; he might consider making the bend Or and the wolf's head argent, assuming no conflicts. 05/93

Griffin ap Bedwyr. Device resubmission. Erminois, a griffin segreant gules, and a chief indented of one sable.


A "chief indented singly" is not, to the best of our knowledge, a period charge. Nor could we, in good conscience, reblazon this "Per chevron sable and erminois": not only does it not seem to be the submitter's intent, the point is too high and shallow to be a real Per-chevron division. This is being returned for redrawing.


Should he resubmit this as a correctly drawn Per-chevron, with the griffin in base, it would be clear of such armories as Conway (Or, a griffin segreant gules), with a CD for the field and a CD for the non-forced move to base. It would still have to be checked against other possible conflicts, of course. 08/92

Griffith Dragonlake. Badge. Barry wavy azure and argent, a sword inverted, the quillons interlaced with an annulet Or.


Though blazoned as above, the charge was visually equivalent to a swept-hilted rapier. We treated the annulet as a "held" charge in considering conflict; and it therefore conflicts with Michael of Monmouthshire (SCA): Per pale azure and gules, a sword inverted palewise throughout Or. Excepting ordinaries, there is no difference for drawing a charge throughout, or not. 08/92

Grim Kirk of Greymoor. Badge. Purpure, a fleur-de-lys argent within a stag's massacre Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Höger (Rietstap): De gueules à une fleur-de-lys d'argent posée entre les cornes d'un massacre de cerf d'Or (Gules, a fleur-de-lys argent within a stag's massacre Or). There's a single CD, for the field. 03/93

Guendolen of Skye. Device. Or, an escallop and on a chief embattled azure, three escallops Or.


The embattlements on the chief are drawn too small and numerous to be identifiable from any distance. Period complex lines were drawn large and bold, the better to be seen. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 05/93

Guljan Mahsati. Name.


While Gul- "rose" is well-documented as a prototheme in late-period Turkish feminine given names, no evidence was provided that -jan "soul, breath" is a valid period deuterotheme. (The citation of Jan from Hanks & Hodges' Dictionary of First Names is not dated.) We need some evidence of at least compatibility with period usage before we can register the name. 7/93

Gundras no Dzintara Krasta. Device. Argent, an oak tree issuant from base and on a chief gules, a zalktis argent.


We were given no documentation of the zalktis as an heraldic charge, or even as a religious symbol. It cannot be found in our standard references -- the OED, for instance, has no entry for it. As this would have been the defining instance of the charge in SCA heraldry, documentation becomes even more important; pending such documentation, this must be returned. 01/93

Gundric Fawkes. Device. Per bend sinister argent and sable, a falcon and a sun counterchanged.


This conflicts with the badge of Sebastian de Grey (SCA): Per bend sinister argent and sable, an owl affronty sable and a lamp reversed argent enflamed Or. Since both groups of primary charges contain a raptor, Rule X.2 doesn't apply; there is a single CD for type of charge. As noted in the case of Stanwulf the Stern (LoAR of Aug 92, p.26), there is no difference granted for turning an owl affonty. 10/92

Gundric Fawkes. Household name and badge for House Wildewyrd. Per bend indented Or and sable, a mace palewise and a goblet fesswise reversed spilling its contents counterchanged.


"House Uncontrolled Destiny" does not appear to follow period practice for house names; see the discussion on household names in the LoAR cover letter of 2 July 92. Using the standard set there, if we won't accept John Wildewyrd, we can't accept House Wildewyrd.


The badge is drawn in a non-period style, with a "mace" unrecognizable as a mace, and a goblet drawn in trian aspect. Either of those flaws alone might have passed, but the two together are unacceptable. 07/92

Gunnar Birkibeinn. Device. Argent, a saltire parted and fretted gules between in fess two ravens addorsed sable.


This conflicts with David Fitzgerald (Papworth 1083): Argent, a saltire gules charged with another humetty of the field. There's a CD for the secondary charges, but the primary charge in both armories is essentially a saltire voided. I can't see granting difference for the tiny changes at the intersection of the saltire.


When this is resubmitted, please note to the submitter that ravens don't have crests -- and do have hairy feathers. 10/92

Gwendolyn æt Faegerlea. Device. Per fess indented vert and gules, two chevrons interlaced between in cross a crescent and three crosses of lozenges Or.


The emblazon cannot be reproduced from the blazon; it requires an exact placement of the chevrons and an exact number of indentations in the field division, which period heralds didn't normally specify. (The artistic norm through most of period would have been three or more indents, which renders the design even more unworkable.) Additionally, there are no period examples of inserting charges within the interlacing of braced chevrons; usually, such interlacing was done so tightly as to leave no room for charges between the gaps. While we might permit charges in the gaps between braced chevrons in a Society design, the other problems in this design combine to warrant return for non-period style. We'd suggest a solid field tincture, with a more orthodox placement of the secondaries. 05/93

Gwendolyn MacAuslane of Loch Lomond. Device. Quarterly azure and vert, a pine tree Or.


This conflicts with Claudas (Fabulous Heraldry, p.57): Azure, a pine Or. There's a single CD, for the field.


Against the arms of DuBois (Azure, a[n oak] tree Or) and the mon of Arima (Dark, a cedar tree light), there's a CD for the type of tree. That, with a CD for the field or tincturelessness, brings these clear. 8/93

Gwendolynn ferch Elydyr. Device. Ermine, a winged panther segreant guardant sable bezanty, wings sable, incensed proper.


This conflicts with Broughton (Papworth 75): Ermine, a lion rampant sable. There's a CD for the addition of the wings, but the bezants in the emblazon were drawn so small as to be mere artistic details, worth no difference here.


If the submitter decides to keep this monster when she resubmits, please have her draw the roundels larger; she should also keep the wings separate from the head and tail, so that they all can be identified. 12/92

Gwyneth Llywelyn Dywyll. Device. Purpure, an open scroll, in chief four quill pens bendwise sinister argent.


This conflicts with Jacqueline Griselda Vittore, registered Jan 92: Purpure, an open scroll between four quill pens in annulo argent. There is a single CD, for the placement of the quill pens. 08/92

Gwyneth MacAulay. Device. Sable, a trillium flower argent, barbed and seeded vert.


This conflicts with the arms of von Lamboting (Siebmacher, plate 85): Sable, a rose argent. There is a CD for type of flower, but not the substantial difference required by Rule X.2. 10/92

Gyles of Drake's Glynn. Name.


The LOI cites glinn, glynn as a spelling variant of glen. In fact, it isn't a variant per se, according to the OED; rather, it's the plural of glen in Gaelic. The toponymic would be fine as Drake's Glen, but the submitter forbade any changes in spelling.


Since he permitted a holding name to be formed, the armory was registered under the name Gyles of Western Seas. 01/93

Haakon Thorgilsson. Badge. (fieldless) A fox's mask argent.


This was submitted as a badge for House Fox Pass. It conflicts with Fandral Silverfox (SCA), Sable, a fox's mask argent; and with Stefan von Bernhardt (SCA), Per bend sinister azure and vert, a wolf's head cabossed argent. In each case, there's a single CD, for the field.


Moreover, there was no archive copy included with this submission; had there been no other problems, it would still have been pended. 01/93

Haldis Hakonsdottir av Hrafnafjord. Name.


The name is a mixture of Old Norse (modern Icelandic) and modern Norwegian. While that in itself is not reason for return, mixing the two languages in a single word (Hrafnafjord) is unacceptable. Either Ramnafjord (modern Norwegian) or Hrafnafjördr, suitably declined (Old Norse) should be used here, as the smallest necessary change to make the name acceptable. (Better still would be to make the name entirely Old Norse [Halldís Hákonsdóttir af Hrafnafirdhi] or modern Norwegian [Haldis Haakonsdatter av Ramnafjord]). Unfortunately, the submitter forbade even the most minor changes to her name. 01/93

Hannah Graham. Device. Per pall inverted arrondi sable, vert, and ermine, a threaded needle inverted bendwise Or.


As drawn, the needle is completely unidentifiable. It is far too small for the available space; while this normally requires only an admonition to "Draw the charge larger", the flaw is fatal on this field. (Even a correctly-sized needle would be hard pressed to be identified on a field per pall inverted arrondi; the curved lines of the field and thread, and the thinness of the needle, combine to cause confusion rather than clarity.)


If the needle were drawn larger, this might be acceptable; but the submitter would be better advised to choose another field as well. 09/92

Hans the Gentle. Device. Or semy of whips sable, a feather bendwise and on a chief gules, a pair of manacles Or.


The majority of the commenters found the design offensive, with its overwhelming connotations of bondage and degradation (B&D). While each of the charges may, by itself, be acceptable -- scourges, for instance, were used as martyrs' symbols in period -- the overall effect is excessive. This must be returned, per Rule I.2.


Additionally, many found the semy of whips unidentifiable. Period armory used scourges, with several lashes, to increase recognition; as drawn here, the charges look more like the ends of shepherd's crooks. Both problems could be solved by deleting the semy altogether. 7/93

Hasim Solomon. Name.


There are two problems with the name. First, there's an aural conflict with Hakim Solomon, registered on this LoAR. Second, Hasim doesn't appear to be documented as a period given name. Hanks & Hodges' First Names is evidently not reliable in this case; we need to see some period examples of the name's use. 12/92

Heinrich von Gugenheim. Device resubmission. Per pale gules and Or, a sheaf of wheat Or and a bunch of grapes purpure, leaved and stemmed vert.


The design had two problems, each sufficient for return. First, the use of the Per pale division with dissimilar charges gave an unmistakable appearance of marshalled armory. This motif is specifically disallowed, per Rule XI.3.a.


Second, the "sheaf of wheat" was unrecognizable as drawn: it did not match the heraldic garb, nor could any of the commenters identify it. He would be well advised to use a standard heraldic garb, when he resubmits.


Note that, though blazoned vert on the LOI, the grape bunch is actually purpure. This would have caused the submission to be pended, had there been no reasons for immediate return. 05/93

Helena Janowska z Bedzina. Badge. (fieldless) A fleur-de-lys per pale argent and gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Flushart (Rietstap): Parti de gueules et d'argent, à une fleur-de-lis de l'un en l'autre (Per pale gules and argent, a fleur-de-lys counterchanged). There's a single CD, for fieldlessness.


It also conflicts with the tinctureless badge of James III of Scotland (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges): A fleur-de-lys. There's a CD for fieldlessness (tincturelessness), but the second CD must come from some category unrelated to tincture. 03/93

Helena Janowska z Bedzina. Device. Per pale gules and argent, a fleur-de-lys within a bordure counterchanged.


This conflicts with the arms of Flushart (Rietstap): Parti de gueules et d'argent, à une fleur-de-lis de l'un en l'autre (Per pale gules and argent, a fleur-de-lys counterchanged). There's a single CD, for the bordure. 03/93

Hengist of Cantia. Device. Argent, a bend sinister sable between a garden rose gules, leaved vert, and a dragon sejant erect vert.


(The name was returned October 1992.) This conflicts with the arms of Benigni (Woodward 133): Argent, a bend sinister sable. There's a single CD, for the addition of the secondary charges. Additionally, most of the commenters found the garden rose unidentifiable as such; at the least, it needs to be redrawn. He would be even better advised to resubmit with an honest heraldic rose. 03/93

Hengist of Cantia. Badge. Argent, in pale a garden rose gules, leaved vert, and a dragon statant vert, a bordure gules.


This conflicts with the badge of the British 42nd Division (MilOrd #674): Argent, a rose of Lancaster [gules], seeded Or, barbed vert, within a bordure gules. There's a CD for addition of the dragon, but none for heraldic rose vs. garden rose.


Additionally, most of the commenters found the garden rose unidentifiable as such; at the least, it needs to be redrawn. He would be even better advised to resubmit with an honest heraldic rose. 03/93

Hengist of Cantia. Name.


This conflicts with Hengist, ruler of Kent c.455. (Webster's New Biographical Dictionary, p.462) Cantia was the name for Kent at the time of his rule; this is a direct conflict. 10/92

Henry of Three Needles. Device. Per pale vairy Or and gules, and sable, a bear sejant erect guardant, collared and chained argent, muzzled sable.


This conflicts with Lachlan Bradoc (SCA), Per pale gules and vert, a bear rampant guardant argent; and with Mylles (Papworth 57), Sable, a bear erect argent, chained and muzzled Or. In each case, there's a CD for the field, but none for the posture of the bear; the collar, chain and muzzle are artistic details. 08/92

Henry of Three Needles. Device resubmission. Per pale vairy Or and gules, and sable, a bear sejant erect guardant, collared and chained argent, muzzled sable, within a bordure argent.


The addition of the bordure, while removing the previous conflict, has introduced a new conflict. This conflicts with the device of Gottfrid Liljebjorn (SCA): Quarterly pean and purpure, a bear rampant within a bordure argent. There's a CD for the field, but as before, no difference for the change in posture, or for the chain and muzzle.


This had been submitted with the field incompletely blazoned. Normally this would have been pended, but the above conflict is valid regardless of the field. The submitter might consider a different posture for his bear. 01/93

Hernando Herodes Montenegro de Mondragon. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A wyvern displayed and facing sinister per pale gules and sable, perched atop a haladie fesswise per pale sable and gules.


A haladie is a type of dagger from India, with a curved blade coming out of each end of the handle. The form shown in this submission doesn't match the haladie described in the submitter's documentation (Stone 275); nor has any form of haladie been documented as known to period Europeans. This must be returned for documentation. 10/92

Heron's Keep, Shire of. Name.


Conflicts with the Shire of Hyrnkeepe, registered July 93. 9/93

Hidden Mountain, Barony of. Badge. Sable, a bezant surmounted by a mountain argent, capped sable, all between three passion nails one and two, heads to center Or.


(This was submitted as a badge for the Order of the Pinnacle of the Mountain.) Though blazoned as a mountain on the LOI, the charge issuant from base is actually a point pointed. Another blazon, one that better reflects the extremely modern style of this design, would be Sable, a bezant indented in base surmounted by a point pointed argent counterchanged sable, all between three passion nails one and two, heads to center Or. The exact geometric alignment, and the modern rendition of the "mountain", combine to make this unacceptably non-medieval style. 7/93

Hierytha Storie. Device. Per fess rayonny argent and azure, a lemming rampant counterchanged sable and argent, in chief a gout gules.


The submission has two emblazonry problems, each sufficient for return. First, the rayonny line is too small to be recognizable from any distance. Second, the beast is not identifiable as a lemming: this is partially due to the drawing style (which has rendered the lemming as a, mm, bolder beast than the vole-like creature one expects), partially due to counterchanging over a complex line (itself a borderline practice), and partially due to the lemming's counterchanging not being of the field. This must be returned for redesign and redrawing. 8/93

Hogar Hanson. Name.


No evidence was presented to support Hogar as a valid given name. Since Hogar, Hoggar is a documented byname (meaning "swineherd"), we need hard evidence of its use as a given name in period before we can register it as such. We might have substituted Hagar, a documented Biblical name -- though feminine, it's been used by Society menfolks before now -- but the submitter disallowed minor corrections to his name. As he permitted a holding name to be formed, however, his armory was registered under the name Ron of Loch Salann. 7/93

Iago al Hasan. Device. Quarterly gules and sable, a gurges argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Gorges (Papworth 6): Azure, five annulets one within the other argent. As seen from the examples in Parker (p.299), Woodward (p.193), and Papworth (p.1122), a set of concentric annulets is simply an alternate method of drawing a gurges or whirlpool; so the arms of Gorges can equally (and with better cant) be blazoned Azure, a gurges argent. There is a single CD, for field. 09/92

Iain MacIain Galloglass. Device. Or, a saltire wavy sable between four arming buckles gules.


Conflicts with the arms of Tacquet (Rietstap): Or, a saltire wavy sable. There's a single CD for the secondary charges. 03/93

Ian Cnulle. Badge. Argent, a pair of blanking shears surmounted by a hammer reversed fesswise between three roundels sable, each charged with a cross couped between four roundels argent.


Technically, the use of mulitple charges on the roundels violates the ban on inescutcheons of pretense (Rule XI.4). Additionally, this is visually rather complex, despite having only two tinctures and four charge types. You might inform the submitter that, in period, coins could be depicted in one of several ways. Plain bezants originally represented Byzantine gold pieces; bezants charged with crosses couped were a more exact representation, used in the arms of the Latin Kingdom of Constantinople c.1275. (Brault's Early Blazon, p.160) Finally, there's an example in late-period English armory of penny-yard pence proper (in the canting arms of Spence); these had cruciform designs stamped on them, without being explicitly blazoned. The pattern on the pence is considered detailing, of no more heraldic import than diapering. The submitter might consider any of these alternatives. 08/92

Iarngard Ragnarson. Household name for House Catmask; to be held jointly with Arnthora Eyulfsdottir.


Catmask doesn't seem to be a period term; the closest phrase in the OED, cat-face, dates to the 19th Century. Even as a constructed noun, it doesn't seem a plausible house name; it might conceivably be an inn name, but only if it were a period noun. We need further evidence before we can accept this as a household name. 08/92

Içiar Albarez de Montesinos. Device appeal. Or, three piles palewise sable, each charged with a cross of Santiago Or, in base a Catherine wheel sable.


The previous submission, identical to this, was returned Nov 89 for non-period usage: medieval piles should traverse the length of the shield, and proper drawn, would leave no room for a charge in base. The submitter has appealed this return, mostly on the grounds that the device is balanced, simple, and esthetically pleasing. While all these may be true, they do not address the reason for the previous return; until that is done, this cannot be accepted.


There was some question as to whether this could be considered a chief indented. Roger Pye, in a series of articles ("Evolution of the Arms of Douglas of Lochleven", Coat of Arms, N.S. vol.III No.107, Autumn 78; "Development of the Pile in Certain Graham Arms", Coat of Arms, N.S. vol.III No.110, Summer 79), has shown that the indented chief in some Scots arms came to be drawn as three piles palewise, as in this submission. However, the earliest example he cites of such a variation dates from 1672, which puts it beyond our use. If this were resubmitted with a true chief indented, it would probably be acceptable; but I can't see any way to register this with piles, so long as there's a charge in base. 01/93

Ihashi Hidezo. Device. Gules, a torii Or and in base a caltrap argent.


The torii is still permitted in Society heraldry, due to its modern familiarity among Occidentals (for instance, the word is found in Webster's Collegiate Dictionary) and its valid reblazon as a Japanese gateway. However, since no heraldic difference can normally be obtained from regional drawing style, we grant no difference between a Japanese gateway (torii) and a standard heraldic gate -- any more than we grant difference between an arch and a dolmen. Therefore, this conflicts with the arms of Portnew (Papworth 898), Gules, a gate Or, and of La Porte (Woodward 363), Gules, a portal Or. In each case there's a CD for the addition of the caltrap, but none for what is essentially an artistic interpretation of the main charge. 06/93

Ilse vom Rhein. Badge resubmission. Or, on a mullet of four points throughout azure a sea-lion naiant Or.


This conflicts with the badge of Astra Christiana Benedict (SCA): (fieldless) On a mullet a cross crosslet. This is a tinctureless badge, so there's one CD for fieldlessness; the second needed CD must come from some other category than tincture. Unfortunately, change of type only of tertiary charge is worth no difference, per Rule X.4.j; and we grant no difference between a mullet of four points and a mullet of five points.


The only way I might have called this clear was to redefine a mullet of four points as a type of cross; and if I could have found such a cross in period armory, I might have done so. But I saw no point in replacing an SCA variation of a period charge with another SCA variation of another period charge; and the thought of reblazoning all the four-pointed mullets in the A&O did nothing to soothe my weary brow.


Mistress Astra has been known to grant permission to conflict, if the submitter personally writes her; she can be reached through the Laurel office. You might pass that on to the submitter. 08/92

Ilya the Wanderer. Device. Quarterly pean and gules, on a double-headed eagle displayed Or a cross formy sable.


This must be returned, for either of two reasons. First, it conflicts with the arms of Godard (Papworth 318), Gules, on an eagle displayed Or, an annulet for difference sable. There's a CD for the field, but as the eagle is not a simple geometric charge, Rule X.4.j.ii gives no difference for changing only the type of the tertiary.


Second, no archive copy of the device was included. Even had there been no conflict, this would still have been returned. 06/93

Ilya Yaroslavovich Kurakin. Name resubmission.


The submitted name, in a slightly different form, was returned June 92 for incorrect grammar and possible intrusive modernity: "A number of commenters had problems with the resemblance of this name to that of UNCLE agent Ilya N. Kuryakin, and it is entirely possible that even were the name grammatically correct that it would have to be returned for being obtrusively modern and 'detrimental to the ... enjoyment of its [the Society's] participants' (RfS I.2) because of that intrusiveness." The resubmission has corrected the grammatical problems, but completely ignored the problem of modernity. Every problem discussed in a previous return must be addressed in a resubmission, and I am loathe to accept any submission where this isn't done. This is therefore returned, without consideration of the merits of the name.


For the record, I agree that the name is technically clear of the Other Man from UNCLE. Conflict is not really the issue here, strictly speaking. The previous return cited modernity: that this combination of given name and byname, by its association with a fictional high-tech spy, will inevitably remind a listener of the 20th Century. That is the issue that must be addressed in any subsequent resubmission.


The submitted armory has been registered under the holding name David of Grimfells. 7/93

Ingfridh Magnidottir. Name.


Magni is indeed the genitive form of Magnus -- in Latin. The correct form of the name would be either Magnadottir (if her father is Magni) or Magnúsdottir (if her father is Magnus). She has forbidden any corrections to her name. 08/92

Inigo Needham Bledsoe. Device resubmission. Per chevron wavy azure and gules, a pig rampant to sinister, its dexter hind limb a peg-leg argent.


The complex line of division is not visible from any distance: the waves are not drawn boldly, and the pig obscures the division between the two dark tinctures of the field. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3.


Several commenters wondered whether the porcine prosthesis was compatible with period armory. I consider this on a par with the arms of Finland (Gules semy of roses argent, a lion rampant crowned Or, its dexter limb an armored arm brandishing a sword, standing atop a scimitar fesswise reversed argent). There should be no problem with the peg-leg. 03/93

Irene the Questing. Device. Argent semy of reremice sable, a chevron inverted gules and in chief two roses vert.


Withdrawn by the submitter. 10/92

Irwyn of Hartwich. Device. Per fess azure and vert, issuant from a castle argent a stag's head Or, attired argent.


This conflicts with the badge for Headless House (SCA): Per fess azure and vert, in base a tower argent couped at the line of division. There is no difference for tower vs. castle, and a comparison of the emblazons showed no real difference for having the charge issuant from the line of division. The only countable difference is the addition of the stag's head, worth a single CD.


Headless House was registered back in 1973, and was intended to be just that: a generic household without a head. Since the badge isn't registered to a specific person, it's impossible to get a letter of permission. 10/92

Isabeau Celeste de la Vallière. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a lion rampant within an orle Or.


Device conflicts with Aron Caomhanach (SCA), Per bend sinister gules and purpure, a Bengal tiger rampant Or, marked sable, within an orle Or, as there is no heraldic difference between a lion and a Bengal tiger, and no difference for the markings on the tiger. 10/93

Isabeau de Foirbeis. Device. Argent, a chevron between three decrescents purpure, overall a horse courant contourny regardant sable.


The placement of so much of the horse on the chevron severely impairs its identifiability. If the horse were in a posture where its legs were on the field, instead of the chevron, this might be acceptable style. 11/92

Isabeau de Poitiers. Device. Purpure, in pale an owl displayed Or and a plate.


The device conflicts with the attributed arms of Sir Gawaine (Fabulous Heraldry #221): Purpure, an imperial eagle displayed Or, armed and langued azure. There's a CD for the addition of the plate, but nothing for type of raptor. 05/93

Isabel du Lac d'Azur. Device. Azure, in bend a thistle slipped and leaved argent and a pomegranate slipped and leaved Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Granata (Woodward 339), Azure, a pomegranate Or, seeded gules; and with the badge of the British 9th Division (Military Ordinary #689), Azure, a thistle slipped and leaved all argent. In each case there's a single CD for the addition of the other primary charge. 10/92

Isabella del Bosque. Badge. (fieldless) A pomegranate slipped and leaved vert, surmounted by a cross flory Or.


When obscured by the cross, the pomegranate becomes unidentifiable -- the moreso since the seeding, a principal trait of the heraldic pomegranate, is entirely overlaid. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 09/92

Isabella du Dauphiné. Name.


The Dauphiné is a region in SE France, which between 1378 and 1830 was nominally ruled by the Dauphin, the heir to the throne of France. Isabella of Bavaria was the wife of that Dauphin who later became Charles VI (Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.763). This name is thus a direct conflict, in the same way Diana of Wales would conflict with the wife of the current Prince of Wales. 10/92

Isabella Julietta Diego y Vega. Device. Per chevron inverted gules, and sable mullety of six points argent, a sun Or and a compass star argent.

First, the submitted "stars of David" are actually solid charges, and not voided at all. Second, even considered as mullets, the semy is drawn so small as to be unrecognizable. Third, we grant no difference between mullets of six points and compass stars, nor between compass stars and suns, so all three are considered as variations on the same charge. Using them all in a single device is not acceptable style. 10/93

Isabelle Claremonde de Sancerre. Badge. Per fess azure and gules, a moon in her plentitude, on a bordure invected Or a tressure azure.


The badge seems acceptable, but must be returned for administrative reasons: no archive copy of the emblazon was included. 06/93

Isle of the Golden Phoenix, Canton of the. Name.


If Isle is considered the substantive element in this name, it conflicts with the Lordship of the Isles, in Scotland. If Golden Phoenix is considered the substantive element, it conflicts with the city of Phoenix, Arizona. In either case, addition of modifiers is insufficient.


Moreover, the name does not really follow a period model. While some places were named for animals, e.g. the Canary Islands, the use of mythical monsters, added adjectives, and a long name bring this beyond the pale. They would be well advised to use fewer phrases when they resubmit. 9/93

Ivar Hakonarson. Badge. (fieldless) A pike haurient gules


This conflicts with the arms of Marchin (Rietstap): Argent, a fish haurient gules. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but nothing for type of fish from a generic fish. 07/92

Ivory Keep, Shire of. Device. Azure, an elephant with a tower atop its back, within a laurel wreath argent, a base wavy barry wavy argent and sable.


The submission has several emblazonry problems. The most severe is the shallow line of the waves on the base; they're indistinguishable from any distance, and are themselves reason enough for return. Less severe, but contributing to the return, are the "downhill" flow of the base and the poorly drawn laurel wreath: the latter, as drawn, is more like two laurel branches, stems in saltire than a genuine penannular wreath. (A correctly drawn wreath would give the elephant more room; the latter could then be drawn larger.) If the submission is redrawn to correct these problems, it should be acceptable. 05/93

Jacobine the Fairhaired. Name.


The documentation in the LOI cites Jacobin as a surname, not a given name. Since jacobine is also a common noun in English, we need solid evidence of its use as a given name before we can register it as such. She might consider resubmitting as Jacoba Fairhare, which has the same meaning in documented ME forms. 03/93

Jacobo Parige. Device. Argent, a fess brettessed between two mullets of eight points azure.


The embattling on the fess is far too small; complex lines were in period drawn boldly, so they could be seen. This is being returned for redrawing in a proper heraldic style. (The mullets, while acceptably drawn, would nonetheless benefit from redrawing, as well -- making the points pointier.) 09/92

Jacqueline de Lyons. Household name resubmission for Maison des Animaux.

The name is intrusively modern, strongly evoking the film Animal House (of which the name is an exact translation). Translation into another tongue can bring a name clear, per Rule V.4.b -- but only if the pronunciation is significantly altered. The difference between Animal and Animaux is too small to be considered significant; and the household designator (House, Maison) is transparent, and counts for no difference. As for the "fame" of the conflict, if a sizable fraction of the populace (of which the College of Arms may be considered a representative sample) recognizes Animal House as a movie title, it's probably necessary to protect it from conflict -- not so much for its own sake, as to keep the modern movie reference from intruding on our medieval re-creation. 09/92

Jacques Gilbert de Gascogne. Device. Azure, a compass star throughout argent and in dexter chief a fleur-de-lis Or.


Conflicts with the Barony of Rivenstar (SCA), Azure, a riverstar argent; Hugard (Papworth 1100), Azure, a sun argent; and numerous others. We grant no difference between a compass star and a rivenstar, and no difference between a compass star and a sun. 9/93

Jakob Stiufsen. Badge. (fieldless) On an escallop argent, a dance sable.

This conflicts with Sieglinde von Elfinstone (SCA): Papelonny Or and azure, on an escallop argent a pellet. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but not for type of tertiary on a complex charge. 12/92

Jame the Heyree Harry's son. Device. Azure, in fess three recorders Or.

This conflicts with the arms of John de Dounton (Papworth 1032): Azure, two pipes Or. While most branches of the Dounton/Dointon family used either organ pipes or straight trumpets in their armory, this device appears to use hautboys (Foster's Dictionary of Heraldry, p.71). I count no difference between hautboys and recorders; there is a single CD, for number. 08/92

James Adare MacCarthaigh of Derrybawn. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A compass star azure, overall a decrescent argent.


It had been announced (LoAR cover letter of 3 Aug 92) that, starting with this meeting, we would no longer register fieldless badges using overall charges. Except for designs with long, skinny charges (e.g. a sword, blade surmounted by an anvil), in general that ban is still in effect. In this particular case, it takes a very careful arrangement of the crescent and mullet to guarantee the identifiability of both; and any design that depends on the exact proportions of its charges is generally not good style. He might consider having his crescent completely encircle the compass star (assuming no conflicts). 01/93

James le Crane. Device. Argent, on a bend azure between two hawks striking, wings displayed sable, three hearts palewise argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Landrit (Rietstap): Argent, on a bend azure three hearts argent. Orientation alone of tertiaries does not garner a CD under Rule X.4.j.ii. 07/92

James Thomas Seabrig. Device. Argent, on a bend between two Catherine wheels sable, a Catherine wheel argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Riddall (Papworth 256): Argent, on a bend sable three Catherine wheels of the first. There's a CD for adding the secondaries; but changing the tertiaries' number is not, by itself, worth a CD under Rule X.4.j. 03/93

Jamie Blackrose. Device. Gules fretty Or, a stag's head cabossed argent and in chief a double rose argent and sable barbed vert.


Conflicts with Audley (Papworth 883): Gules fretty Or. See the cover letter for a full discussion of the status of fretty. After much consideration, I must rule that fretty is a charge, not a semy, not a field treatment, but a charge in its own right. There is thus a single CD, per Rule X.4.c, for the addition of the overall charges. 09/92

Jamys Ellyn Rothesay of Bannatyne Hall. Device. Per pale embattled gules and sable, a cross "formy" Or, a chief Or crusilly sable.


There are three problems with the device as submitted. First, the embattled line is drawn far too small to be considered period style. Second, the cross overlies the complex division between low-contrast colors, making it even harder to identify. Finally, the cross is not truly a cross formy; the submitter is wrong in thinking it a Maltese cross, and we could not document this form in any of our sources. This must be returned, per VIII.3 for the field, and for documentation of the cross. 09/92

Jane Falada of Englewood. Household name and badge for Ursus Imminere. Gules, a sword argent, overall a bear's head erased to sinister proper, a bordure argent semy of ivy leaves vert.


The household name and badge were twice submitted on the LOI: once under Jane's name, and once under the name of John the Bearkiller (q.v.). Per our current policy on joint badge registration (LoAR cover letter of 3 Aug 92), one of these gentles must be designated the primary badge-holder. Since the badge uses a currently unacceptable practice (the brown bear's head on the gules field), this could only be registered under the Grandfather Clause -- which means Jane may not be the primary badge-holder. 10/92

Jararvellir, Barony of. Badge resubmission. Sable, an estoile of eight rays formed of four strands of seaweed embowed and counterembowed argent, overall two fish naiant in annulo Or.


(This was intended as a badge for the Order of the Pisces, whose name is already registered.) First, the seaweed is not identifiable as such; nor is there a "standard" seaweed, so there seems little chance of rendering seaweed identifiably. Second, conjoining what are essentially plant stems into a complex geometric arrangement is basically non-heraldic style; the awkwardness of any possible blazon (an estoile!? an escarbuncle?) illustrates the nonheraldic nature of this design. We suggest that any resubmission forego any use of seaweed. 10/93

Jarek Blackthorne. Name.


The given name does not seem to be a valid medieval name. While Searle does cite examples of names using the protheme Iar- (Gear-), he cites no similar examples using -ec (-ecg). Jarek may be a Czech given name, but if so, it shouldn't be used with an English surname (as opposed to, say, a lingua franca translation of a Czech byname). We need some evidence of usage before we can register this name. The device was registered under the holding name Michael of Stormhold. 09/92

Jaric de l'Ile Longe Sault. Badge. Gules, three leaves conjoined in pall inverted within an annulet fracted in pall argent.


This conflicts with Madelaine Catherwood (SCA), Gules, a trillium and a chief invected argent. There's a CD for changing the annulet to a chief, but the central charges are indistinguishable. 01/93

Jay MacPhunn. Device. Checky azure and argent, three skulls vert.


The name Jay MacPhunn was returned on the LoAR of June 93. Normally, we'd register the device submission under a holding name. However, we could not legitimately form a holding name in this case. We usually form holding names from the submitter's mundane given name and his local SCA group; in special cases, we might borrow from the submitted name as well. But the original name was returned because Jay, the submitter's mundane given name, is intrusively modern. A holding name formed in the usual manner would have the same problem; indeed, all the alternate names suggested by the submitter had that problem. We could not form a holding name in this case -- and therefore cannot register the device.


Some of my staff thought it unfortunate that this device be returned on a technicality regarding the name, and urged me to form a holding name out of whole cloth: Jason of Havbjorn, for instance. I considered it, but decided not to set such a dangerous precedent. The College of Arms already has a reputation for arbitrarily changing people's names. I see no need to fuel that reputation by selecting a name for this client from thin air; that would be truly arbitrary. At least, when correcting people's grammar, we try to give them a name with their desired meaning; when forming a holding name, we either use elements from the submitted name (which we can therefore assume are acceptable to the client) or else the mundane name and SCA branch, following a procedure carefully defined beforehand. Choosing a name on a whim for this submitter would follow neither his preference nor our procedure; it would usurp his privilege to choose his own Society name. Even with the best of intentions -- to register his device -- I'm not willing to take that step. 7/93

Jay MacPhunn. Name.


Jay is documented only as a noun and surname in period; as it's the client's mundane given name, it was submitted under the aegis of Rule II.4. Such submissions, while usually acceptable, can be returned if the name is "obtrusively modern". We find Jay to be obtrusively modern, by virtue of its sound: it sounds like an initial, as in J. P. Morgan, and thus post-period.


We might have considered this acceptable as a "bird name", akin to Robin, had we been shown a common pattern of usage that birds were used as given names in period. But we could think of no examples offhand, save Robin; and one can make a good case that the bird's name derived from the given name (a diminutive of Robert) rather than the reverse. Without period examples, Jay must be considered intrusively modern, and unacceptable even under the Legal Name Allowance. 06/93

Jean Claude Marcel. Device. Azure, a griffin segreant contourny within an orle of fleurs-de-lys Or.


It has been repeatedly ruled that the use of multiple gold fleurs-de-lys on blue backgrounds is unacceptable in SCA armory; it is simply too suggestive of a claim to connection to French royalty. In the present case, we have a specific precedent disallowing the orle of fleurs-de-lys: "The use of the fleurs-de-lis in orle here on the azure field creates precisely the appearance of a field azure, semy-de-lis Or, upon which the [charge] has been placed. As this field is not permitted in the Society due to its close association with the royalty of France, the submission must be returned." [AmCoE, LoAR of 30 April 89, p.17]


Against the arms of Morland (Papworth 981), Azure semy of leopard's heads jessant-de-lys, a griffin segreant Or, there's a CD for the posture of the griffin and a CD for type of charge in the semy -- though I agree it's close. 11/92

Jean Philippe des Bouviers Noirs. Device. Quarterly arrondi sable and Or, in bend sinister two bouvier de Flandres dogs statant sable.


The bouvier de Flandres does not seem to be a period breed of dog. According to Simon & Schuster's Guide to Dogs, #43, "There is no real agreement concerning the origin of this Franco-Belgian breed. Probably it was formed by crossing the griffon and the Beauceron..."; the griffon and Beauceron breeds, in turn, were developed in the 19th and 18th Centuries respectively.


Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, period blazons did not specify an exact breed of dog; at best, they would describe a dog by its general characteristics (levrier) or for a cant (talbot). The SCA does permit known period breeds to be specified in blazon, but I consider the practice an anomaly or "weirdness"; another anomaly in the design, such as the use of Quarterly arrondi, might itself be sufficient grounds for return.


Finally, this conflicts with the arms of Martyn (Papworth 145): Argent, two talbots passant sable. There's a CD for the field, but because Jean's dogs are of one of the field tinctures, the placement of the charges is forced in this case; thus, there's not a CD between the in bend sinister of Jean's dogs and the in pale of Martyn's. (Had Jean's field been, say, Quarterly gules and Or, we'd agree there would be a CD for placement of charges. Only when the charges share a tincture with the field do we not grant a CD for placement; placement is forced in that case.)


Nota bene: The arrondi lines were not necessary to remove the appearance of marshalled armory. Per Rule XI.3, a quarterly field with two uncharged quarters, the other quarters bearing identical charges, is not considered marshalling. 8/93

Jeanne de Rennes. Device. Per fess argent and azure, two swans naiant, that in base inverted and contourny counterchanged.


It was the consensus of the College that the use of the inverted animate charge and hyper-symmetric design is not compatible with period heraldic style. We'd suggest using two swans in their standard posture. 03/93

Jeanne Estelle de Mouthe. Device resubmission. Azure, a swan naiant, wings elevated and addorsed, on a chief wavy argent three mullets azure.


The wavy line of the chief is drawn far too small to be visible from any distance. Medieval armory used bold lines, the better to be seen. This must be returned to be redrawn. 01/93

Jessica Gwenda Lovett. Name.


Gwenda appears to be a modern construction. We need evidence of its use in period before we can register it. Unfortunately, the submitter has disallowed any but the most minor changes to her name. 09/92

Joanna d'Oléron. Device. Or, a garden rose purpure slipped and leaved vert and on a chief purpure three garden rosebuds bendwise sinister Or.


There is a longstanding policy that one may not use two close variants of the same charge in one design. It creates visual confusion, where the whole purpose of heraldry is instant identification. The almost-but-not-quite identical charges need not be a single group; this is not related to our ban on "slot-machine heraldry." (We wouldn't allow, for example, a sun between three compass stars either.) If there's not a CD between the two charges, they should not be used together in the same design. Therefore, this must be returned. 9/93

Jochi, Guardian of the Night. Name and device. Azure, a chevron between an owl's head couped between two mullets of four points and a pair of double-bladed axes in saltire argent.


The epithet follows no period naming practice of which we are aware; on the surface, it seems so patently fantasy-oriented as to be unacceptable. At the very least, we need some evidence that Mongols styled themselves in this manner.


The device has several conflicts, of which Allenson (Papworth 373), Azure, a chevron argent, is typical. There is a single CD, for the addition of the secondary group. Having three types of charge in the secondary group is also reason for return, being forbidden under Rule VIII.1.a. 08/92

Johann Götz Kauffman von Erfurt. Device. Argent, a double-headed eagle gules, on a chief triangular embattled sable a cup Or.


With very rare exceptions (e.g. in combination with enarched lines), the use of two or more complex lines on the same charge is confusing, and unattested in period armory. (Wavy raguly? Embattled rayonny? I think not.) In this case, the chief could be either embattled or triangular -- but not both. 12/92

Johann Mathern. Device. Bendy sinister argent and gules, on a pale azure a unicorn rampant beneath seven mullets of seven points in chevron argent.


When compressed on the pale in this manner, the mullets in chevron strongly resemble an arch of mullets. This motif has been returned before now (in the LoARs of Sept 84 and Feb 91), and there seems to be no reason not to continue this policy. 01/93

Johann von Sternberg. Name and device. Per fess indented azure and argent, in chief a compass star elongated to base argent.


No forms were included with the LOI, for either the name or the device. The submission must therefore be returned.


Additionally, the device had multiple conflicts. The firmest were the devices of Ulrich Drachendonner (SCA), Tierced in pall azure, gules and sable, in chief a compass star argent; and of Aliena of the High Reaches (SCA), Azure, in honor point an estoile of four greater and four lesser points above in base three mountain peaks, the centermost enhanced, argent. In the first instance, there's a CD for the field, but nothing for type or placement of the charge. The second, while technically clear, is overwhelmingly similar visually.


It also conflicts with the badge of the Kingdom of Ansteorra (SCA), [tinctureless] A mullet of five greater and five lesser points distilling gouts. There's a CD for tincturelessness, but none for number of points on the mullet (from 8 to 12); and the gouts are too small to be worth difference. Placement on the field cannot be counted against a fieldless badge.


Finally, there are several conflicts with other armories, all based on a forced move of the mullet to chief. Typical of these are the badge of the Barony of Rivenstar (SCA), Azure, a rivenstar argent, and the arms of Huggard (Papworth 989), Azure, a mullet of six points argent. There's a CD for the field, but as the mullet is argent, it can't be centered on the half-argent field; its movement to chief is forced, and thus is not counted for difference. The variations in mullets are likewise worth no difference here. 9/93

Johannes of Amstelveen. Device. Quarterly per fess rayonny azure and Or, in the first quarter three bees and in the fourth quarter a dolphin Or.


This runs afoul of Rule XI.3, which forbids the appearance of marshalled armory. The use of multiple charges in the first quarter, and of a different type of charge in the fourth quarter, gives a strong impression of independent coats in those quarters. The use of the complex line of partition does not entirely dispel that impression. 08/92

Johannes von Brückenheim. Badge. Sable, on a lozenge argent a rose leaf vert.

Conflicts with Burgthor: De sa. á une losange d'arg. (Sable, a lozenge argent) (Rietstap). There is only one CD for the addition of the rose leaf. 9/93

John MacGuire. Device. Argent, a pale sable, charged in base with a crescent Or, overall a Lakenvelder bull statant proper.


Prior Laurel rulings have banned the use of animate charges counterchanged over an ordinary. While the submitter has tried to get around this ban by using a striped breed of bull, the visual effect is still that of a bull counterchanged over a pale. Heraldry is a visual art; the visual effect cannot be avoided by clever reblazons. This violates our ban on complex counterchanging and must be returned for redesign.


The Letter of Intent gives the surname as Maguire, but it was previously registered to this individual as MacGuire. Please inform the submitter of the correct spelling. 9/93

John Quartermain. Device. Per pale sable and Or, in pale a castle counterchanged, battlements enflamed gules, and a bicorporate lion counterchanged.


This conflicts with the Canton of Ponte Alto (SCA): Per pale sable and Or, in pale a single-arched bridge and a laurel wreath counterchanged. There's a CD for the type of charge in base, but none for castle vs. single-arched bridge. 09/92

John Skinner of Rivenstar. Badge. (fieldless) Two straight trumpets in saltire, bells in base argent.


The use of two straight trumpets in saltire is reserved to the seals of Principal Heralds, and has been since at least 1983. It is the motif itself that's reserved; changes of tincture, addition of charges, or (as here) inversion of the trumpets, don't affect the reservation of that motif, any more than they affect the reservation of crowns to the armory of royal peers. 03/93

John the Bearkiller. Household name and badge for Ursus Imminere; to be held jointly with Jane Falada of Englewood. Gules, a sword argent, overall a bear's head erased to sinister proper, a bordure argent semy of ivy leaves vert.


The household name lacks a designator (House, Domus, etc.), required per Rule III.1.b. Even were such a designator added, the name would be incorrect grammar: "(House) Bear to Be Imminent" makes no sense, in English or Latin. Without knowing the submitter's exact intention, I cannot suggest a correct Latin construction.


The badge has four types of charge and four tinctures, which is pushing the limits of acceptable complexity. Given the poor contrast of the brown head on the gules field, the badge as a whole becomes unacceptable. (The submitter may use a brown head on a gules field, thanks to the Grandfather Clause; but new submissions must still be judged on their own stylistic merits.)


Finally, there's a procedural question regarding the submitter's current joint registration with Heather of Tyson (House of the Scarlet Diamond, Argent, a fillet cross arrondi sable between in bend two lozenges gules). Under our current policy on joint registration, one person would be the primary badge-owner, with authority to release the badge. It's not clear what policy was in force in May 83, when the current household name and badge were registered; it may be that John does not have the unilateral right to release them without Heather's permission. He may wish to consider a straightforward transfer to her, instead. 10/92

John Wolfstan. Device. Per pale azure and gules, a bend embattled counter-embattled Or, overall a wolf's head erased contourny argent.


The embattled line is drawn far too shallow to be visible from a distance, particularly when debruised by the wolf's head. Please have him resubmit with a boldly drawn line. 01/93

Jon of the Mists. Device. Azure goutty d'eau, in chief a cloud argent.

This conflicts with Winterbottom (Papworth 898), as cited in the LOI: Azure, goutty de eau. This conflict call engendered much discussion in the commentary, centering on whether the cloud was a peripheral secondary charge (thereby making this a conflict with Winterbottom) or a primary charge (thereby clearing the conflict per Rule X.1). One might argue either way: Had this been, e.g., Azure, in chief a cloud argent, the cloud would probably be the primary; had this been, e.g., Argent goutty d'eau, a chief nebuly argent, it would definitely be a conflict.


In this case, the gouts are the primary charge group, and the cloud a secondary charge. Approach it by approximations: Comparing Azure, a gout argent vs. Azure, a gout and in chief a cloud argent, there would certainly be a conflict; likewise Azure, three gouts argent vs. Azure, three gouts and in chief a cloud argent, and Azure, six gouts argent vs. Azure, six gouts and in chief a cloud argent. In none of these hypothetical cases could Rule X.1 be invoked for adding the cloud in chief; the gouts are the primary charges. Increasing the number of gouts even further (to goutty, the present submission) does not change this. This is a conflict with Winterbottom, with a single CD for adding the secondary charge in chief. 09/92

Joseph of Silver Oak. Badge. Sable, in pale two trefoils, each within and its stem conjoined to an annulet argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Boisset (Rietstap): De sable à deux trèfles d'argent (Sable, two trefoils [in pale] argent). There's a single CD, for the addition of the annulets. 04/93

Joseph Peschur. Device. Vert, a fish naiant pierced by an arrow bendwise inverted Or.


The arrow was drawn with barely perceptible points and fletching. Charges must be drawn in their period form (per Rule VII.3), so that they can be identified (per Rule VIII.3). See the cover letter for a more complete discussion of this issue.


Anent Cathal Sean O'Connlauin (SCA), Vert, a sailfin sculpin naiant proper, a check of his file showed an argent fish with some sable markings. It, and all the other citations of Vert, a fish argent, are clear of this submission with a CD for fish tincture and a CD for the arrow. If he resubmits with a correctly drawn arrow (and assuming no new conflicts are found), there should be no problem. 07/92

Juan Sanchez Ramirez. Name and device. Per bend sinister gules and sable, a bend sinister bevilled between in pale a skull and a skull inverted argent.


The name infringes on that of Juan Sanchez Villalobos Ramirez, the immortal played by Sean Connery in the film Highlander and its sequel. (The name is unlikely to soon fade into obscurity, for two reasons. First, the Highlander films have spawned a TV series, keeping the name in the public eye for some time to come. Second, the character is played by Sean Connery, which evidently makes the character ipso facto memorable; there are people [like some of my female friends] who would drive a hundred miles to hear Sean Connery read the telephone directory.)


It also infringes on Sancho I Ramirez, King of Aragon in 1063 and of Navarre in 1066 (Louda & Maclagan, Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, table 45). Sanchez is the patronymic form of Sancho (being the genitive case; it means literally "of Sancho"), so the name is a claim of descent, prohibited under Rule V.5.


The bend sinister in the device is not correctly drawn: it does not issue from the sinister chief, as the ordinary should, nor is it correctly bevilled (see the LoAR cover letter of 18 Sept 92 for a complete discussion on bevilling). Combined with the inversion of the lower skull, the whole device is unacceptably poor style. 09/92

Judith Anne of Durmast. Device. Per chevron inverted argent and vert, in chief an oak branch fructed proper.


This conflicts with Amade (Papworth 1112): Argent, an oak branch acorned (or fructed) proper. There's a CD for the field, but none for the movement of the mostly-vert charge to chief (since that's required by making the field half-vert), and in this case, none for orientation (since the visual difference between a branch and a branch inverted is well-nigh invisible). 09/92

Juliana Richenda Trevain. Badge; to be held jointly with Yngvar the Dismal. Per pale sable and vert, on a sun argent a decrescent gules.


This conflicts with Ellen Winterbourne (SCA): Gyronny azure and vert, on a mullet of eight points argent an eagle's head erased gules, beaked sable. There's a CD for the field, but no difference between a multi-pointed mullet and a sun; and a single change to the tertiary is not worth a CD in this case, per X.4.j. 07/92

Justin of Kent. Device. Argent, three crosses crosslet sable, on a chief gules a quill pen Or, all within a bordure sable.


This conflicts with the arms of Redy (Papworth 671): Argent, three crosses crosslet sable, on a chief gules a lion passant guardant Or. There's a CD for the addition of the bordure, but the design is not simple enough for Rule X.4.j.ii to be invoked; thus, no difference is granted for the change in type of tertiary on the chief.


When a bordure and chief are used together, the chief almost invariably overlies the bordure (Parker 73). The rare exceptions generally don't have tertiaries on the chief; they would be crowded by the bordure, rendering them harder to identify. The handful of SCA registrations with bordures surmounting charged chiefs have subsequently been disallowed as precedent (LoAR of Oct 91, p.17); far more often, such designs have been returned as non-period practice. This must likewise be returned. 12/92

Justin of Kent. Badge. Argent, three barrulets wavy azure between a cross crosslet sable and three oranges proper, leaved vert, all within a bordure sable.


(This was submitted as the badge for Tricitrine Abbey.) The badge is over-complex: it combines four types of charge and five tinctures, which exceeds the standard of complexity outlined in Rule VIII.1.a. Combined with the use of proper, the style is unacceptable. We suggest simplifying the badge and eliminating the proper tinctures; if they resubmit with a bordure, please have them draw it wider. 05/93

Kairenn Suile Gáiritecha. Name.


Kairenn (Cairenn) appears to be a unique name, that of the mother of Njall of the Nine Hostages of Irish legend. It has been returned before now (Cairenn of CuaRuadh Keep, Aug 91). 09/92

Kaitlyn McKenna. Device. Per chevron vert and purpure, three bezants in chevron between two cats couchant guardant respectant Or and a mermaid proper.


Device submission withdrawn by Asterisk Herald. 09/92

Kamilla van Anderlecht. Device. Azure, on a pile argent between two bezants, a red fox salient contourny proper.


As colored on the submission form, the fox is half tawny orange and half argent. As such, it has insufficient contrast against the argent pile. We suggest she resubmit with a fox gules. 03/93

Kaolin Karsikko. Name and device. Argent, three chevronels braced vert, in chief a unicorn passant vert ermined Or.


The given name was submitted on the strength of a citation in Geirr Bassi's Old Norse Name. This was an error, probably due to multiple photocopying: the actual name is Kaðlin, with an edh. (It appears to be the Old Norse form of the Irish Kathlín.) Kaolin turns out to be a common noun, a form of white clay used in making porcelain; as such, it's unacceptable as a given name in the SCA.


I didn't feel comfortable substituting Kadhlin (Kaðlin), the name documented in Geirr Bassi: the submitter's mundane given name is K'Lynn, and presumably she wants a similar-sounding SCA given name. There are Irish names that are close in sound -- e.g. the feminine given name Cáelainn (Ó Corrain & Maguire, p.41) -- but we're leery of combining an Irish given name with a Finnish surname without some evidence of regular period contact between those two cultures. The submitter needs to decide what she wants to do. When she resubmits, she should include evidence that Karsikko is also a period name element.


The full-sized emblazon showed a unicorn, not a unicornate horse, so there should be no stylistic problems with the device when she resubmits. 08/92

Kari Stormeye. Device. Per chevron argent and counter-ermine, a griffin segreant counterchanged.


This conflicts with the seal of King Edward III: (tinctureless) a griffin (Fox Davies, Heraldic Badges, p.97). The tincture of the field counts for one CD, but according to Rule for Submission X.4.d, tinctureless armory may not count difference for the tincture of the charges. 9/93

Kataura Hachirô. Device. Azure, within a Hayashi-yama, a dexter triple tomoe, all within an annulet argent.


It has long been the College's policy (v. the LoAR of 17 April 83) that Japanese-style SCA armory must conform to the standards of European heraldry; in particular, it must be blazonable in European terminology. For many of the charges used in period Mon, this poses no problem. Tomoe, however, cannot be blazoned in standard heraldic terms; they were disallowed for that reason on the LoAR of Nov 92. This submission cannot be accurately blazoned, and must therefore be returned. 05/93

Katharina von der Waldwiese. Device. Per pale Or and azure, a firebird displayed within a bordure engrailed counterchanged.


The primary charge does not appear to be a valid period usage. It is not a Russian firebird; that is essentially a variant of peacock, is found in period art, and has been accepted for SCA use. As drawn here, the bird is composed of flame, which is unattested in either period art or period armory. Since it is so easily confused with either a bird or a flame, I must rule this "firebird" unacceptable, pending solid evidence of its period use.


Moreover, if the charge is considered a stylized bird, this conflicts with Carpenter (Papworth 303): Per pale Or and azure, an eagle displayed counterchanged. There's a single CD, for the bordure. 12/92

Katherine of Thorneholde. Device. Argent, on a pale azure between two garden roses gules another Or, on a chief azure, an arrow reversed Or.


Returned for complexity. Note that the miniature emblazon on the LOI sent to Laurel, and the full size emblazon, differ from the miniature emblazon on the LOI sent to the College! The former show garden roses; the latter shows heraldic roses. The complexity count is at our limit -- four tinctures, four types of charge -- and the weirdness added by the garden roses causes it to fall over the edge into unacceptability. 10/93

Katherine of Thorneholde. Device. Argent, on a pale azure between two garden roses gules, slipped vert, a garden rose Or, slipped vert, on a chief azure an arrow reversed Or.


This is too complex. It has four types of charge in five tinctures, which exceeds our standard for complexity as outlined in Rule VIII.1.a. While that guideline may be waived for a comely period design, the use of garden roses prevents this from being considered such a design. 12/92

Kathleen O'Connor. Device. Argent, a pegasus courant to sinister within a bordure dovetailed azure.


The dovetailing of the bordure is far too small to be identifiable. Please instruct the submitter to draw large, bold dovetails when she resubmits.


Note: The default wing posture for courant, passant or statant winged beasts is elevated and addorsed. This, therefore, is superfluous in the blazon and can be omitted. 9/93

Katrine Vanora of Maidstone. Badge. (fieldless) An estoile gyronny wavy of twelve Or and purpure.


In Society heraldry, while fields may be gyronny of as many as 12, charges may be gyronny of no more than 8. (LoAR of 22 March 83)


Moreover, this conflicts visually with the badge of Daffyd of Emmet (SCA): (fieldless) A mullet of six points gyronny of twelve Or and gules. (Daffyd's badge, registered in Aug 79, predates the precedent.) While we concede sufficient technical difference, a visual comparison confirmed they were too close. 10/92

Kazimir Petrovich Pomeshanov. Badge for Sommerfield Hall. (fieldless) A coiled match argent, lit proper.


The consensus of the College was that a coiled match is visually too similar to an annulet to grant a CD between the two. This therefore conflicts with the arms of Gyra (Rietstap), De sinople à une annelet d'argent (Vert, an annulet argent); and with the Mon of Obuchi (Hawley 85), Dark, a ring light. In each case there's a single CD, for fieldlessness. 09/92

Keja Tselebnik. Name and device. Azure, an owl displayed within two concentric annulets argent.


No documentation was presented to support the use of Keja as a given name -- not even a quote from the cited source, let alone photocopies. None of the commenters could provide documentation for Keja; without such documentation, the name cannot be registered.


The device has multiple conflicts, notably the arms of Cayne (Papworth 298), Azure, an eagle displayed argent, and Wampage (Papworth 316), Azure, an eagle displayed within a double-tressure argent. In each case, there's a CD for addition (or change) of the secondary charges, but none for type of raptor in similar postures.


Should she resubmit with an owl displayed, please instruct her to draw it in the true heraldic posture of displayed, not in the "striking affronty" posture of this submission. 03/93

Kenrick atte Kyte. Name and device. Quarterly azure and argent, in bend an eagle's head erased contourny and a flute palewise argent.


The use of the quarterly field with two different charges in opposite quarters gives a strong appearance of marshalled armory, and is disallowed per Rule XI.3.a. 11/92

Keridwen of Aaron Isles. Name.


Standard usage of this form of locative requires the definite article: of the Aaron Isles. The submitter forbade any changes to this part of the name; therefore, barring independent documention of the locative, it must be returned.


The submitter's use of this locative is based upon her membership in the household of Francis of Aaron Isle. The Rules for Submission allow the invocation of the Grandfather Clause only for cases of blood relationship; self, parent/child, husband/wife or siblings. SCA relationships such as households and knight/squire cannot invoke the Grandfather Clause since they are excluded from its provisions. Since this submitter doesn't appear to be a blood relative of Francis of Aaron Isles, the Grandfather Clause is not applicable. 9/93

Keridwen of Caermarthen. Device. Or, three maple leaves conjoined at the stems vert and three bendlets enhanced purpure.


The device is excessively imbalanced, which is not period heraldic style. A similar device (Penelope of the Quill, Vert, a quill pen bendwise and three bendlets enhanced Or) was returned Jan 92 for the same reason. She might try putting another set of bendlets in sinister base to balance the design. 09/92

Keridwen the Mouse. Device. Gules, in base a mouse sejant erect to sinister, its tail nowed argent.


This conflicts with Edgar the Unready (SCA): Gules, a mouse rampant argent. There is a CD for the posture of the mouse. The submitter argues there should be a second CD for the mouse's placement on the field; and if the mouse were truly in base (i.e. drawn as though occupying the bottom portion of a field Per fess), I might agree. As drawn, however, the mouse is mostly centered, and of a size that wouldn't even merit an admonition to "draw the charge larger". It cannot be considered to be abased enough to receive a CD.


Note that, should the submitter decide to redraw this with the mouse shoved into the base point, she risks a return for another reason: if drawn too small, the mouse will lose its identifiability. She would do better to submit a truly medieval-style device. 09/92

Khasar of the Keshik. Device. Gules, three horses salient and a gore sinister argent, all within a bordure ermine.


The lack of contrast between the gore and the bordure causes them to blend together, reducing the identifiability of both. It's true, as Lord Crescent notes, that since contrast of each charge is measured against the field, they cannot have good contrast with one another. But, if anything, that argues against any use of a gore with a bordure whatsoever.


This case might have been acceptable had the bordure been, say, Or; there would still have been enough contrast to allow its distinction from the gore. But the contrast between argent and ermine is exactly the same as between argent and argent goutty sable: nonexistent. We cannot concede that the two charges will be distinguished from any distance. This must therefore be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 11/92

Kian Hrafn af Durness. Name resubmission.


The use of the Old Norse preposition af requires the following word to also be in Old Norse. Durness is Scots English; the Old Norse equivalent would be Dýrnes. Moreover, af would cast the placename into the dative case; the correct form of the phrase would be af Dýrnesi. We might have made those changes, or substituted the English of for af, but the submitter forbade any grammatical corrections. The name must therefore be returned; the submitted armory has been registered under the holding name David of Côte du Ciel. 8/93

Kiera Lye d'Alessandria. Device. Gyronny gules and argent, in saltire four roses counterchanged, barbed and seeded proper.


The Tudor rose, defined to be a combination of a red and a white rose, is a prohibited charge in SCA heraldry. One period form of Tudor rose was a rose per pale gules and argent (or argent and gules) (Boutell); this submission's charges could be equally well blazoned four Tudor roses saltirewise. 07/92

Kieran Bren of Bannockburn. Device. Gules, a chevron embattled Or between two chess rooks and a Celtic cross argent.


Conflicts with the arms of Bromage (Papworth 447): Gules a chevron embattled Or between three helmets proper. The helmets being argent, there is a single CD, for type of secondary charges. 01/93

Kieran MacCrimmin. Device. Per pale vert and argent, two scarpes counterchanged between five stalks of barley arranged as in a garb Or and a bunch of grapes purpure, slipped and leaved proper.


This is too complex. There are five tinctures and three types of charge, which is on the edge of acceptable complexity; the counterchanged ordinaries, and the unorthodox arrangement of barley, conspire to send it over the edge. This must be returned for simplification; he might be advised to use an honest heraldic garb, as well. 10/92

Kieran ó Chonnacht. Household name for House Dun Tine.


This directly conflicts with the Shire of An Dun Theine. 09/92

Kieran ó Chonnacht. Badge. (fieldless) On a targe Or, an equal-armed Celtic cross purpure.


In precedents dating back to June 86, it has been ruled that, in a fieldless badge, a charge commonly used for armorial display (e.g. an escutcheon, a delf, a lozenge, etc.) should not itself be charged. That includes roundles, and most particularly targes (a shield by any other name).


Moreover, considering this as a display, on a round shield, of Or, an equal-armed Celtic cross purpure, this would conflict with Uilliam Uaine (SCA): Or, a Celtic cross purpure, overall a frog salient to sinister vert. There would be a single CD, for deleting the overall charge. 09/92

Killian Nc Iain VcFarland. Device. Per bend sable and vert, a griffin sejant erect argent.


There are several conflicts, notably with Culehech (Papworth 982), Sable, a griffin rampant argent; Griffine (ibid), Vert, a griffin rampant argent; and Griffin Val Drummond (SCA), Per pale purpure and azure, a griffin segreant argent, bearing in its dexter talon a morgenstern and in its sinister talon a targe charged with a tower azure. In each case, there's a CD for the field, but by SCA precedent, there's no difference between rampant and sejant erect. The only real change is the placement of a hind leg. In the case of Griffin Val Drummond, the "held" charges add no difference. 06/92

Knutr Stormkarter. Name resubmission.


The name, in the slightly different form Knutr Stormrkartr, was returned on the LoAR of Aug 92: it had been incorrectly formed, and if it had meant what the submitter said (which it did not), would have been a claim to non-human powers. The resubmitted form is still incorrect -- as noted in his last submission, the correct Old Norse for "storm cart" would be stormkartr -- and in any event, the byname is still not applicable to a human being. He needs to show that period humans were described as moving storms before we can even consider this name, in any incarnation. The submitter has forbidden any corrections. 9/93

Knutr Stormrkartr. Name.


The byname is incorrectly formed: in combination, stormr loses its final R. Even were it correctly formed, it wouldn't mean what the submitter claims: stormkartr means "storm cart", not "storm bringer". Finally, even if the name meant "storm bringer", it would be a claim to superhuman powers, forbidden under Rule VI.2. Lord Dragon has suggested Hreggnasi "tempest nose", for one who could smell a storm coming; perhaps the submitter would consider that. 08/92

Konall Rogersson. Device. Or, a serpent glissant to chief and a bordure gules.


Conflicts with Cuthbert (Papworth 1043): Or, a serpent erect in pale, the head flexed barwise to the dexter chief, debruised by a fess gules. By current definitions, in each case the serpent is the primary charge; there is thus a single CD, per Rule X.4.e, for changing the type of secondary charge.


When the gentle resubmits, please instruct him to draw the snake larger. 10/92

Konner MacPherson. Badge. (fieldless) On a flame issuant from base gules, a falcon's bust issuant from base argent detailed sable.


A fieldless badge cannot have charges issuant from the edge, per Rule VIII.5. Additionally, the sable detailing is mostly on the bust's edge, giving it poor contrast with the gules flame. 10/92

Konner MacPherson. Device. Per pale sable and argent, a tower counterchanged enflamed proper.


Conflict with the device of Michel d'Avignon (SCA): Per pale sable and argent, a two-towered castle counterchanged. There's no heraldic difference between a tower and a castle; even granting a CD for the flames, there's still not enough difference.


When he resubmits, please have the submitter draw the enflaming in a correct medieval manner: spurts of flames issuant from the sides and top. As drawn, this is halfway between a tower enflamed and a flame charged with a tower. 10/92

Krista al Kamil. Name.


No name forms were included, so it is being returned without consideration of the merits of the name. 10/93

Krzysia Wanda Kazimirova. Device resubmission. Argent, a Russian firebird volant bendwise sinister embowed gules within a border sable.


While the addition of the bordure has removed the conflict of her previous submission, the firebird is now drawn in a non-heraldic posture. The above blazon was the most accurate we could devise, and it isn't all that accurate. We permit the use of motifs from non-armorial art only if they are rendered (and blazonable) heraldically; this firebird is not. This must be returned for redrawing -- with the caveat that, if the firebird were drawn in an heraldic posture, there might be new conflicts introduced. 11/92

Kunrad Fuchs. Device. Argent, a bend sinister azure between two fox's masks per pale Or and gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Kabbel (Rietstap): D'argent à une barre d'azure (Argent, a bend sinister azure). There's a single CD for the addition of the fox's masks. 03/93

Kyle Gryphus. Device. Gules, on a pile argent, a griffin segreant to sinister maintaining a sword gules.


The full-size emblazon showed the pile drawn correctly. However, the device still conflicts with Betton (Papworth 1021), Gules, a pile argent, and Delap (Papworth 1023), Gules, on a pile argent an eagle displayed of the field, with only one CD for the addition or change of the tertiary charge. 10/93

Lachlan O'Sheridan of Falconhold. Badge. Per pale purpure and sable, a horse with the feet of a lion rampant Or.


Conflicts with the mundane arms of Rietheim (Siebmacher, plate 30), Argent, a mule rampant Or. There is no difference given for horses versus mules, and the feet are too small to count for difference here. 10/93

Lachlan O'Sheridan of Falconhold. Badge. Per pale Or and sable, a monster composed of the body of a horse with lion's feet rampant purpure.


While newly-invented chimerical monsters are usually permitted, they must be recognizable in all their parts. This monster is unidentifiable, and so unacceptable. Half the monster has extremely poor contrast against the black half of the field. The part with good contrast, against the gold half of the field, has its outline obscured by the non-standard stylization of the mane. That might not have been fatal, had this been a horse or a lion; but when the creature is a composite of the two, identifiability is paramount. This must be returned. 03/93

Laeghaire O Laverty. Badge. (fieldless) A carver's mallet sable.


Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 8/93

Laeghaire ua'Laverty. Badge resubmission for alternate persona of Geoffrey Peal. Party of six pieces gules and Or, three bells Or and a chief sable.


The addition of the chief removes the conflict from the previous return. However, there's now a lack of contrast between the sable chief and the field. The field is equally gules and Or, and technically neutral with respect to contrast -- for charges that are equally supported by the gules and Or traits. A centrally placed sable charge, or a sable bordure, would have sufficient contrast; but a sable chief might not. (The problem is not unique to this field division: Per bend gules and Or is a neutral field, but Per bend gules and Or, a chief sable still suffers a lack of contrast.)


In this case, the chief's contrast is exactly the same as with a hypothetical Gules, a pale Or and a chief sable. We would return the latter, were it submitted; we must likewise return this. The client might consider counterchanging the tinctures of the field, or using a bordure. 06/93

Laeghaire ua'Laverty. Badge. Party of six pieces gules and Or, three bells Or.


This was blazoned on the LOI as Per fess gules and Or, on a pale counterchanged between two bells, a bell Or. That would be the normal modern blazon, but not the period blazon. In period, this was considered a field division, not a counterchanged pale. It appears to have been considered a field division from its invention, mid-15th Century, to the end of our period: the arms of the Worshipful Company of Girdlers, granted 1454, were blazoned on the grant as a schucheon of .vi. pointes of Azure & gold with .iii. greydyron [gridirons] of that same, while the arms of Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, were given in the Parliamentary Roll of 1540 as Party of six pieces or and gules three fleurs de lys azure and three pelicans or. It wasn't until Bossewell's Armorie of 1572 that the field began to be blazoned as a counterchanged pale -- and Bossewell makes clear that this is an alternate blazon, not the recommended style. The "official" blazon is still as a six-parted field: "Partie per fesse, countercolored in 6. quarters .... and the same I do commende, for that he which used hys blazon was an Heraulte, and wel learned in theire mysteries."


With such documentation in hand, I have little choice but to count this a conflict with Swymmer, cited in the LOI (Papworth 181): Gules, three bells Or. There's a single CD, for the field.


There was some feeling that the College has a long-standing tradition of regarding this as a counterchanged pale, not a field. I couldn't find any precedent or ruling supporting such a tradition. Quite the contrary: our policy is that we register the emblazon, not the blazon, and a conflict found under any valid blazon is a real conflict. We try not to equate charges with field divisions, but occasionally we must -- witness how often we must call conflict between a pile and Chaussé -- and based on the new research presented, this is such a case. Any change that would distinguish this as a counterchanged pale (e.g. tincture, complex line) would bring this clear of Swymmer; so would reversing the field's tinctures, which would put the bells 1&2. 10/92

Laghamon le Vavasour. Device. Or, two bars dancetty and in chief a greyhound courant contourny sable.


Conflicts with the arms of Shilford (Chesshyre & Woodcock, vol.I, p.23): Or, two bars dancetty sable. There's a single CD, for adding the greyhound. 10/92

Landric Dægmær. Device. Per pale embattled purpure and sable, a pegasus rampant argent, winged Or, and a sword, blade enflamed, proper.


Purpure and sable are the darkest of heraldic colors, and there's insufficient contrast between them to permit idenitification of the embattled line. Rule VIII.3 requires all elements of the design -- including complex lines of division, if any -- to be identifiable. The Rule goes on to give examples of cases that wouldn't be identifiable: "For instance, a complex line of partition could be difficult to recognize between two parts of the field that do not have good contrast if most of the line is also covered by charges." Those examples are just that: examples, not an exhaustive list. It is quite possible for a complex line of partition to be unidentifiable, even if not covered by charges; that is the case here.


Lady Triton asks that, if this submission is returned, we change our Rules and explicitly state what will and will not be acceptable. Short of defining a set of "sufficient-contrast" combinations of dark tinctures, such as was done in the 1986 Rules, I don't see how to do this; nor am I convinced of its necessity. As written, Rule VIII.3 is general enough to cover all cases, but gives enough specific examples to be useful. We could insert a new example into the subtext, based on this submission, but I don't think that's what Lady Triton had in mind.


An objective test for identifiability can be found by researching period armory. There are some cases of divided fields using all-colors, with no separating ordinary; sable/gules, azure/gules, and vert/gules were far and away the most common combinations. There are many cases of divided fields (color/metal) with complex lines of partition; indented and wavy were the most common, though there are examples of nearly all our permitted lines. A cursory search found a handful of period cases with a divided field, using two colors and a complex line of partition: e.g. the arms of Hugh de Neville, c.1245, Quarterly indented gules and vert, a bend Or; and of West, c.1470, Quarterly indented azure and gules, a bend argent. I found neither an example of an embattled division of any two colors, nor any field party of sable and purpure. Admittedly, my search was brief, but I suspect a longer search would still yield no period examples. If Party embattled purpure and sable was not used in period, it would be for the same lack of identifiability as with this submission.


My best advice is simply: use a color combination found in a period example. Replacing Purpure with Gules in this submission would probably be acceptable. Beyond that, neither I nor the College can say which color combinations will have sufficient identifiability, until we see them; that, after all, is the ultimate test of identifiabilty. 08/92

Lars Gilsson. Device. Or, a demi-drakkar couped palewise reversed sable, sailed vert.


Conflicts with the arms of Echlin (Papworth 1089): Or, an antique galley with sails furled sable and forked pennon gules. There's a CD for the change to the ship, but we can't see granting Sufficient Difference per Rule X.2; and as both the drakkar and the antique galley (i.e. lymphad) are nearly symmetrical charges, there's no difference for which half of the boat is cut away. Prior Laurel rulings (LoARs of July 91, Nov 91) have granted no difference for the tincture of a ship's sails -- just as we grant no difference for sails furled vs. unfurled. 10/92

Lars Knarrarsmidr. Device resubmission. Gules, on a bend between a rooster displayed argent and a lion fesswise rampant, feet to chief Or, a spear gules.


Withdrawn by the submitter. 08/92

Lasairfhiona ni Dhoineannaigh. Household name for House Bearcat.


The earliest use of the compound Bearcat was the Stutz Bearcat automobile, an intrusively modern construction. Were it not for the automobile, the name might well be acceptable, though not with the submitters' intended meaning: taking bear as a verb, Bearcat "carry the cat" fits the pattern [verb] + [noun] found in such bynames as Crakeshield and Shakespeare.


The submitters permitted the name to be changed to House of the Bear and Cat, which might make a plausible inn name. However, this was too great a change for us to make without the College's commentary. The name should be resubmitted in the usual manner, and our onomasticists can thrash it out then. 09/92

Lasairfhiona ni Dhoineannaigh. Badge. (fieldless) On a flame proper, a goblet Or.


Conflicts with the US 63rd Division (Military Ordinary, #647): Khaki, a flame of fire throughout gules, thereon a sword palewise Or charged on the upper blade with a goutte de sang palewise. There are no CDs for the type of tertiary charge in this case. 09/92

Laura de Botelsford. Device. Per saltire vert and sable, a sea-griffin contourny reguardant queue forchy argent.


This conflicts with Ann of Galway (SCA): Gules, a sea-griffin erect to sinister argent. There's a CD for field, but not for the head posture or number of tails. 06/92

Laurence Trenton Everett. Device. Azure, three scarpes argent, in pale three mullets of four points azure.


This conflicts with the U.S. 3rd Division (MilOrd #277): Azure, three bendlets sinister argent. There is a single CD for adding the tertiaries. 07/92

Leah Kasmira of Natterhelm. Blazon correction. Gules, a cat-a-mountain couchant guardant, tail reflexed to base Or, orbed vert, within a bordure vair ancient.


The submitter wishes her device's blazon to specify the exact placement of the cat's tail. (She's also added the tincture of the eyes, which isn't in the current blazon, registered 31 Oct 82.) While I sympathize with the submitter's wish to have her emblazon rendered as she prefers, this can't be done at the expense of correct blazonry. The posture of the tail is heraldically insignificant; moreover, the proposed reblazon doesn't use standard heraldic terms. Reflexed to base is not to be found in Parker, Franklyn & Tanner, Woodward, or any of our normal texts; nor is it found in the OED. As Lord Crescent noted, it seems pointless to "clarify" a blazon with an ambiguous phrase. This seems to be a problem more easily solved by communication with the artists than by torturous reblazon. 03/93

Leandre de Boisvert. Name.


The name conflicts with Leandra du Bois (SCA). Addition of an adjective, coalesced or not, is not sufficient difference, per Rule V.2. (If the submitter truly desires to be "of the green wood", that would be du Bois Vert in French. Please pass that on.) 10/93

Leifr Feilan Ingvarsson. Device. Per pale sable and azure, in pale a sunburst and a wolf rampant argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Fresh (Papworth 98): Per pale sable and azure, a wolf salient argent. There is a single CD, for adding the sunburst. 09/92

Leonia Dubarry. Device. Gules, in chief two escallops argent.


This conflicts with Acre (Papworth 681): Gules, three escallops argent. There's a single CD, for number of charges.

This conflict had been considered by Lord Vesper, but Lord Crux Australis had argued that there should be a CD for the escallops' placement on the field ("in chief" vs. "centered"), as well as their number. The ensuing discussion in the commentary on defaults and forced changes has been enlightening, but has missed an essential point: one cannot grant difference for change between two groups of charges, if the attribute being changed (placement, posture, whatever) doesn't apply to both groups.


This point is easier to see when applied to other categories of change ... for example, posture. The change between a lion rampant and a hand apaumy is a single difference, for type. We don't grant two CDs, for type and posture -- because lions can't be apaumy and hands can't be rampant (Baron Robin's "extra-ordinaries" notwithstanding). Change between two postures can only be counted if both charges could be in those postures. The principle was discussed further on the LoAR of 15 Sept 85, p.3.


Placement can be dependent on other categories of change besides number. For instance, between a chief and a base there's a single CD, for type -- not two CDs, for type and placement on the field. The latter cannot be counted, because chiefs by definition cannot be in base. The only categories in which difference can be counted are the ones both charges share: in this example, type of charge.


Finally, to take an example close to the current case: between one bezant and in pale two bezants we count a single change, for number. There's no further difference counted for placement -- not because the charge groups are (or aren't) in their default placement, but because a single bezant cannot be in pale.


So it is for this submission. Between Leonia's device and the arms of Acre we count a CD for number. Acre's charges are two and one -- a placement which can only apply to groups of three charges. Any other number of charges is hard pressed to get a CD for placement, because no other number can be 2&1. Had Acre's arms been, say, in bend three escallops, I'd agree there should be a CD for placement as well as number: groups of either two or three escallops can be in bend, or in chief. But since only groups of three charges can be 2&1, a change to any other number wouldn't normally count the change in placement independently.


This specific case is complicated by the fact that Leonia's escallops are on the same spots on the shield as two of Acre's escallops. The visual effect is simply the deletion of the escallop in base, a single change. There are examples in period armory of exactly such a change being considered a cadency change: e.g. Rotherfield, c.1395, Gules, three fleurs-de-lys ermine, and its cadet branch Rothfeld, c.1586, Gules, in chief two fleurs-de-lys ermine. (Papworth 851, 849). There are other examples in Papworth: e.g. Rodney (Or, three eagles displayed vert) and its cadet branch Rodney (Or, in chief two eagles displayed vert). This change even applies to groups other than the primary charge group: e.g. the ancient arms of Stormyn, (Gules, a chevron between three mullets argent) and the Chester branch of Stormyn, 1586 (Gules, a chevron and in chief two mullets argent).


To sum up: the change from three charges 2&1 to two charges in chief cannot count a second CD for placement on the field, because two charges can't be 2&1. Period examples show the difference between this submission and Acre to be a single cadency change. This must be returned for conflict. 01/93

Leoric de Tanet. Device. Per fess argent and azure, a dragon passant close between three suns, each charged with a cluster of grapes fesswise, all counterchanged.


The dragon is, at best, only marginally identifiable, due to its unusual posture (wings folded against the body) and counterchanging. We suggest putting the dragon into its default segreant posture, and using a more standard rendition of grape clusters. 05/93

Liam ó Dubhghaill. Name.


There are two problems with the name. First, Liam doesn't appear to have been a period diminutive of Uilleam. All the sources that cite Liam do so as a modern diminutive; the period diminutive was Uillec. Without evidence of period use, we can't register Liam.


I would have substituted Uilleam or Uillec here, but for the second problem: This conflicts with William McDougall (1871-1938), a founder of the field of Social Psychology. He has his own entries in the Encyclopedia Britannica and Webster's Biographical Dictionary, so he's important enough to protect. Neither translating into Gaelic nor the patronymic particle is worth difference here, per Rules V.4.b and V.2. Even using the diminutive won't help: per V.4.c, a name gets no difference from its diminutive. (See also the LoAR of March 92, p.13, where this same conflict was called on another submitter named William Dougal.) 07/92

Licoricia du Lac Noir. Device. Or, a swan naiant sable, in sinister chief a crescent bendwise sinister azure.


This conflicts with the badge of Western Australia, as used on their flag:, Or, a swan naiant sable (Crampton's Flags of the World, p.14). (It's the mirror image of their arms, as found in the quartered arms of Australia [ibid, p.13].) There's a single CD, for adding the crescent. 01/93

Llyn Arian, Shire of. Device transfer (to the Shire of Mordenvale). Per fess gules and argent, a fess embattled sable between a demi-sun Or issuant from the line of division and a laurel wreath gules.


Transfer returned. There were no forms included for the action. (We need at least new submission forms with the name and device of the new owners of each piece of armory on them. Note that a transfer is really two actions, an offer and an acceptance. Both are needed to effect the transfer.) Even had there been forms, this action is fraught with problems. The LoI's commentary on the transaction between Llyn Arian and Mordenvale said in one place that it was an "exchange" of devices, and in another that the two groups were merging; these cannot both be true. For this reason, even had there been forms, this would have been pended to allow Vesper and the people of the (new) Shire of Mordenvale to decide what they want done with their current armory.


The problem, as we see it, is this: if Llyn Arian is merging with Mordenvale (the new group so formed to still be called Mordenvale), then the Shire of Llyn Arian as an independent entity ceases to exist. It therefore cannot have any armory. The old Mordenvale armory cannot be retained as a badge, because only devices may contain laurel wreaths. It cannot be retained as a device, because only one device may be registered to any primary name. No matter how this is resolved, both of these devices cannot continue to exist as they are. Please consult with the submitters and determine what they really want before resubmitting. 10/93

Llyn Arian, Shire of. Device transfer (from the Shire of Mordenvale). Per chevron inverted vert and sable, a chevron inverted between a lymphad, sails furled, and a cup within a laurel wreath, all Or.


Transfer returned. (See previous submission for commentary.) 10/93

Llywellyn MacLamont. Device change. Per pale gules and Or, an acorn counterchanged, on a chief dovetailed sable four arrows fretted "in cross" Or.


The arrows are not in a blazonable heraldic posture. They aren't fretted "in cross", as blazoned on the LOI, but more like "in crosshatch" -- with two arrows fesswise and two bendwise sinister. Moreover, because the arrows are pointing in four different directions, the blazon required to describe it would be so complex as to clearly show the non-period style of the submission.


If he resubmits with a similar motif, please have him draw the acorn larger. You might also indicate whether his current device is to be released or retained as a badge. 7/93

Loch Salann, Barony of. Name resubmission for the Order of the List of Chivalry.


The previous name, Order of the Flower of Chivalry, was returned Oct 90 for infringing on the SCA Order of Chivalry. The resubmission is equally an infringement. Though both names are technically clear by the addition of a substantive phrase (List of, Flower of), the overwhelming appearance is of a collection of members of the Chivalry. It's worth noting that the submission forms give the intended Order name as List of Chivalry -- no "Order of" -- which appears to be closer to the Barony's intent and which is definitely a conflict.


This must again be returned. We recommend to the Barony that any further resubmissions avoid any use of the term Chivalry. 8/93

Loch Soilleir, Barony of. Badge resubmission. Vert, a sea-serpent in annulo, head to chief and biting its own tail argent.


This same submission was returned November 1991 for conflict with Elffin of Mona (SCA): Vert, an annulet rayonny on the outer edge argent and in chief a sword fesswise proper. They have redrawn the serpent, enlarging its head to aid in identification. Unfortunately, the previous submission was not returned for visual conflict, and therefore is not dependent on drawing style. Rather, a sea-serpent in annulo is simply not a CD away from an annulet rayonny on the outer edge. Redrawing the sea-serpent does not necessarily change that fact.


This must again be returned for conflict with Elffin of Mona. The Barony might consider writing His Majesty of Drachenwald and asking for permission to conflict. 9/93

Loch Soilleir, Barony of. Badge. Vert, a sea-serpent nowed argent.


(This was submitted as the badge for the Order of the Serpent's Toils of Loch Soilleir. Note that this is the registered form of the Order name.) This conflicts with the arms of Bloore (Papworth p. 1043): Vert, a serpent bowed embowed debruised, the tail torqued Or. There's a CD for the serpent's tincture, but nothing for the exact form of nowing.


Should the Barony resubmit with this motif, please have them draw the sea-serpent's distinguishing characteristics larger, to promote identification (and to avoid possible conflict with a knot-badge). 9/93

Lore von Vechta. Device. Azure, a cinquefoil and an orle dovetailed on the inner edge Or.


The device has several conflicts, of which the arms of Sir Stephen Bessyngton are typical (Papworth 68):

. There's a single CD, for the addition of the orle. 05/93

Lough Devanree, Shire of. Name change (from Lough Davanree, Shire of).


The name Davanree, derived from the Irish Damh an Ríogh "ox of the king", was registered on the LoAR of Jan 92. The submitters have appealed this spelling, preferring Devanree, and citing the anglicization of the Irish placename Daimhinis as "Devenish" in evidence.


Unfortunately, in the example of Daimhinis, the word for "ox" is in the genitive case ("of the ox"), not the nominative. (A similarly anglicized surname, Ó Daimhín "O'Devine", likewise uses the genitive case in the Irish.) The value of the vowel changes between nominative and genitive -- indeed, in speech, it's almost the only way one can distinguish between the cases. Given the submitters' desired meaning, the word for "ox" (damh) is far more likely to be pronounced "dahv" -- anglicized dav-, or possibly dov-, but not dev-. Without evidence that the nominative (not genitive) case of the noun is anglicized dev, we cannot accept Devanree as a valid form of the name. 11/92

Louisa Reynell. Device. Gules, on a bend sinister cotised Or, a fox passant contourny sable.


This conflicts with Ursula von Moenchwald (SCA): Gules, on a bend sinister cotised between two bears passant guardant Or, a quill sable. There's one CD for the deletion of the bears, but Ursula's device isn't simple enough for Rule X.4.j.ii to apply. As currently worded, the Rule requires both armories under comparison to be simple.


Against Aithne Sionnach (SCA), Gules, on a bend sinister cotised argent, a fox courant contourney gules, there's a CD for the tincture of the bend, and (since they're considered a group of secondary charges) another for the tincture of the cotises. 01/93

Lucas Phelan MacPhail. Device. Or, two swords inverted in saltire sable between two foxes combattant gules marked proper.


This is in visual conflict with Russell Balgair (SCA): Or, a sword inverted azure hilted sable between two red foxes combattant proper. We concede sufficient technical difference, with a CD for number of swords and a CD for their tincture -- but when held side-by-side, technical difference is outweighed by the visual similarity. 01/93

Luciano Giovanni di Churburg. Device change. Or chapé ployé azure ermined Or, a gillyflower azure.


This conflicts with the Mon of Yamaguchi (Hawley 16): Dark, a carnation light. Since the Mon is treated as a tinctureless badge, we get one CD for fieldlessness. There is no heraldic difference between a gillyflower and a carnation.


Against the badge of Moira Maureen ua Seamus of the Green Hills, reblazoned elsewhere on this LoAR (A chicory flower azure slipped and leaved vert, the stem surmounted by a ladybug proper), there's a CD for fieldlessness and a CD for the overall charge. Against most of the other conflicts cited by commenters, there's a CD between a gillyflower and the types of flowers involved. 09/92

Lucius Thayne. Name.


A thane (or thegn) was a free retainer in pre-Conquest England, and in Scotland up to the 15th Century; the term denotes a member of territorial nobility corresponding to the Norman baron or knight. The title was one step below the eorl, and might be either earned or inherited. In the SCA, the term is used as the Old English equivalent of "baron", and is therefore reserved. Old English usage puts the title after the name: Ælfred cyning, Leofric eorl, Lyfing arcebisceop. The submitted name is thus exactly in the form that would have been used by a period thane. That fact, along with the Society use of the title, and its hereditary nature in period, outweighs the documented use of Thane, Thaine as a surname later in period. It must therefore be returned as presumptuous. (OED, under the entries for earl, king and thane; '93 E.Brit., vol.11, p.672; Reaney DBS II, pp.112, 345)


A discussion of the questions regarding the use of titles (in period and in the Society) and the appearance of presumption may be found in the cover letter. 7/93

Luisa of the Willows. Badge resubmission. Per bend purpure and gules, a sword and a bordure wavy crested Or.


Though blazoned on the LOI as rayonny, the bordure is in fact wavy crested. This line of division was introduced to heraldry in the 20th Century, and is thoroughly modern; it has not been accepted in Society armory for over a decade. Please have the submitter use a period line on the bordure. 9/93

Luke of Caerleon. Device. Per chevron argent and vert, a dragon passant vert maintaining an open book argent, bound proper, and a mullet of four points Or.


The maintained book is effectively argent on argent. While the rule of contrast is not ironclad for maintained charges, they still may not be the same tincture as the field. 11/92

Lynette la Tisserande des Mots. Name.


This submission was an appeal of a return by the Ansteorran College for non-period style. The submitter contends that the phrase la Tisserande des Mots ("the weaver of words") could only be interpreted metaphorically, so its literal meaning is beside the point; and that a person "of poetic inclination" would have described herself by such a metaphor.


Unfortunately, the submitter has provided no evidence that period bynames were ever so fanciful or metaphoric. In both English and French, bynames are usually straightforward descriptions: of origin, of personal description, of trade or craft. Even a professional bard would call himself simply bard. Without some evidence that "abstract metaphor" was used in period bynames, the name cannot be accepted.


Even accepting the submitter's argument at face value, the construction's literal meaning ("weaver of words") doesn't yield a valid metaphor for her desired meaning ("poet, storyteller"). The concept of weaving is used in several metaphors, but always referring to the final product: the OED (under "weave" and "weaver") cites period examples of weaving allegory, history, and woe; post-period metaphors refer to weaving tales, fables and songs. In every case, the metaphor involves the final product, not the materials used: a "weaver of words" might possibly be an inventor of new words, but never a poet or storyteller. In any case, we would need hard evidence of that usage in French before we could register the byname.


We suggest the submitter simply register Lynette la Tisserande, and privately tell her friends exactly what she weaves. For now, her armory has been registered under the holding name Lynette of Loch Soillier. 06/93

Lyon's Mountain, Shire of. Name.


Under current Rules, this conflicts with the Mountain Confederation (SCA), and with An Tir's Mountains Pursuivant. In either case, the change in designator (Shire of, Confederation, Pursuivant) is worth no difference; and the addition of the modifier (Lyon's) insufficient to bring it clear.

The justification for the name presented in the LOI (a mountain near the French town of Lyon) doesn't appear reasonable. However, using lyon as an archaic spelling of "lion", the name follows that same pattern as that of the Silesian town of Löwenberg (now called Lwowek Slaski), chartered 1217. 8/93

Lyondemere, Barony of. Badge. (fieldless) On an elephant statant to sinister argent a banner barry wavy vert and argent, charged with a lion's paw escallop Or.


There are two problems here. The first is contrast: the banner, equally argent and vert, has insufficient contrast on the argent elephant. From a distance, the result is a set of disembodied green streaks, not a banner. The second is complexity: the escallop is a quaternary charge, disallowed per Rule VIII.1.c.ii. While we might waive that Rule for special cases, such as augmentations, that does not apply here. 08/92

Lyulf MacFlandry. Name.


The surname does not appear to be correctly constructed. The LOI attempted to justify MacFlandry as meaning "son of the man from Flanders". There are examples in Black of MacX surnames, where X is an ethnic name: e.g., MacBrabner, "son of the Brabanter", and MacBretny, "son of the Breton". Based on those names, we could accept "son of the man from Flanders" -- but unfortunately, the term for "man from Flanders" is Fleming, which sounds nothing like Flanders (or Flandry). The surname de Flandre, also cited in the documentation, means "of Flanders"; Mac (de) Flandre would mean "son of Flanders", which (except in a metaphoric sense) is impossible. Either Lyulf de Flandry or Lyulf MacFleming would be a valid construction; MacFlandry is not.


The submitter, on his submission forms, tried to justify MacFlandry as "a made-up Scots-sounding name", and noted the registered names of Robert MacFlandry of Dundee and Duncan MacFlandry. However, those names were registered back in 1981; both our naming standards and the quality of our name resources have increased since then. The name cannot be considered "made-up" when it's documented from period elements; it's the incorrect grammar, not the choice of elements, that mandates the return. The submitter is blood kin to neither Baron Robert nor Baron Duncan, so the Grandfather Clause doesn't apply here; the registration of their names a decade ago does not oblige us to register the current submission.


The name must be returned. The submitter's armory is registered under the holding name Jeffry of Dragon's Mist. 09/92

Madeleine Bynortheweye. Device. Per chevron inverted purpure and vert, three roses Or within a bordure wavy argent.


There are two emblazoning problems with this submission. First, the wavy line of the bordure is drawn far shallower in the full-sized emblazon than in the LOI miniature -- too shallow to be recognizable from any distance. This is in itself sufficient reason for return.


Second, the flowers were unidentifiable as roses -- among other things, heraldic roses are normally drawn with five distinct petals, not the four conjoined petals of these flowers. The second problem, unlike the first, possibly might not have been sufficient for return -- a note to the submitter might have sufficed -- but given the bordure's identifiability problem, the roses' identifiability must also be addressed. This must be returned for redrawing. 06/93

Maelgwn McCain. Device. Sable, a castle argent between an eagle displayed and two bars wavy couped Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Hitchins (Papworth 366): Sable, a castle argent. There is a single CD, for the addition of the secondary charges.


It also conflicts with the device of Anne of the White Tower (SCA): Sable, a tower argent. Again, there's a CD for the secondary charges; the current Rules grant no difference between a tower and a castle. 8/93

Maerric atte Mor. Device. Argent, three axes in fess and on a chief embattled sable, a dolphin argent.

The embattlements on the chief are drawn too small and numerous to be identifiable from any distance. Period complex lines were drawn large and bold, the better to be seen. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3.


If he resubmits with this motif, please instruct the client to draw the axes more closely the same size, as befits a single group of charges. 05/93

Magdalena Aeleis MacLellan. Device. Argent, two thistles proper and a pomegranate gules, slipped and leaved vert, seeded Or, a bordure sable.


The pomegranate was blazoned "proper" in the LOI, but a pomegranate proper (as seen in the arms of the Kingdom of Grenada) is vert, seeded gules. Had it in fact been proper, this would be returned for overuse of proper charges. As it is, there are six tinctures and three types of charge, which exceeds our standards of complexity as found in Rule VIII.1.a.


I would grant a CD between a thistle and a pomegranate. This obviates any difficulties that would arise from using not-quite-identical charges; it also brings this clear of conflict from Donodei (Woodword), Argent, three thistles proper. 08/92

Magdalene Katherine MacDonald of Sleat. Name.


As Lady Ensign has noted, the combination of a clan name with the seat or territory of the clan is the prerogative of the chief of the clan, and is thus disallowed in the Society. The submission therefore infringes on the chief of Clan MacDonald of Sleat. The problem might have been avoided by deleting the toponymic, but the submitter forbade any changes to her name. 8/93

Magdalene von Rottweil. Device. Azure, a stag trippant and on a chief argent a grapevine proper fructed purpure.


This conflicts with Bertrand de Molleville (Rietstap): Azure, a stag trippant and a chief argent. There's a single CD, for the tertiaries on the chief. 07/92

Mairin ferch Howell. Device. Argent, a branch of rosemary vert, flowered azure, within a bordure embattled purpure.


This conflicts with the device of Cassandra Boll von Bayer (SCA): Argent, a sprig of three bluebells azure slipped and leaved vert, within a bordure embattled azure. There's a CD for the tincture of the bordure, but not for type of sprig -- and the visual resemblance is overwhelming.


There were also a number of other conflicts, all based on granting no difference for type of sprig: e.g., Brobrough (Papworth 1112), Argent, a slip of three leaves vert, or the badge of Rosemary Petsley (SCA), Argent, a sprig of parsley vert. 09/92

Mara of the Oak Leaf. Device. Sable, on a pale Or between two arrows argent, points and feathers Or, an oak leaf bendwise vert.


The points and feathers of the arrows are so small as to be invisible, rendering the arrows unidentifiable as arrows; we've been returning arrows for this reason since the LoAR of July 92.


Moreover, since the arrows as drawn are indistinguishable from any other long, skinny charges, this conflicts with Einar of Ironhold (SCA): Sable, on a pale Or between two swords inverted hilted Or and bladed argent, a staff sable. There's a CD for the changes to the tertiary charge, but if the arrows can't be identified, we can't grant a CD for their type. 01/93

Marc O'Malley. Name.

Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 9/93

Marcev Bloodfoot. Name and device. Counter-ermine, on a pile ployé argent a seeblatt gules.


Marcev is indeed documented, as the submitter states, on p.88 of Unbegaun -- as a surname only. The submitter needs a given name. We might suggest Marketz (or, as Unbegaun spells it, Markec), the diminutive of Mark from which Martsev (Marcev) derives.


The device seems acceptable, but the submitter permitted no changes whatsoever to his name, so we couldn't even register this under a holding name. 07/92

Marche Sauvage, Shire of le. Name and device. Sable, a laurel wreath argent within a stag's massacre, a bordure Or.


The name conflicts with the Earls of March, and with their herald, March Pursuivant. The former are listed in general references (e.g. the 1911 E.Brit., vol.xvii, p.685); the latter is on the list of protected heraldic titles from the 1987 A∓O confirmed by Mistress Alisoun. In neither case is the change of designator (Shire of, Earls of, Pursuivant) or addition of the adjective sufficient difference.


The device looks acceptable, but cannot be registered without a name. 9/93

Marco Giovanni Drago Bianco Vento. Name.


The submitter documented the last three bynames as Italian nouns ("Mark John Dragon White Wind"), which doesn't appear to be a valid style for Italian names. Even with evidence that Drago, Bianco and Vento are surnames, the use of five name elements is excessive. The longest Italian name documented in the commentary was a 16th Century name with four elements (Giovan Francesco Palladio della Olivi, cited by Lady Ensign). Pending evidence that five-element names are acceptable, I must return this. 09/92

Marco Palladio di Soncino. Household name for Casa Peregrina.


Conflicts with the Peregrine Pursuivant, registered to the West Kingdom. The change in designator is insufficient difference. 12/92

Marcus il Volpe. Device. Azure, a sea-fox argent.


This conflicts with the badge of HMSubmarine Seawolf, cited by Master Hrolf Herjolfssen via Lord Hund: Azure, a sea-wolf argent. (The badges of British ships are registered with the English College of Arms, so this is "real" armory, deserving protection under our current standards.) There's no heraldic difference for sea-fox vs. sea-wolf. 09/92

Margaret Elizabeth Aison of Devon. Device. Gules, a bend sinister engrailed Or, goutty sable, cotised plain between in chief two arrows inverted in saltire and in base three horseshoes interlaced in pall inverted Or.


This is overly complex: the profusion of types of charge (engrailed bend, plain cotises, gouts, arrows, horseshoes) and the unusual arrangement of the charges in base, push this beyond the limits of acceptable style. This needs to be simplified; when she resubmits, ask her to draw the charges to fill the available space, as well. 10/92

Margaret Menteith. Device. Argent, a heart gules charged with a key inverted argent, a bordure embattled azure.


This conflicts with Thomas Heath (SCA): Argent, on a heart gules, a unicorn passant reguardant argent. Current precedent does not permit the heart to be considered a "simple geometric charge" for the purposes of Rule X.4.j.ii; therefore, only changing the type of the tertiary is not worth a CD. The only countable difference is for the addition of the bordure. 9/93

Margaret ny Connor. Device. Per pale sable and gules, a sinister gauntlet clenched sustaining three calla lilies argent slipped vert, within a bordure embattled argent.


The bordure is too narrow, its embattling too small, to be identifiable at any distance. Complex lines were drawn boldly in period, the better to be seen. The must be returned for redrawing. 8/93

Margaret of Galashiels. Device. Per bend sinister nebuly vert and azure, a three-headed thistle, slipped and leaved, and a lymphad argent.


The low contrast between vert and azure renders the nebuly line indistinguishable from any distance. As with the recent case of Per pale embattled purpure and sable (LoAR of Aug 92, p.25), I must return this for lack of identifiability, per Rule VIII.3.


When she resubmits, you should instruct the submitter in the correct heraldic depiction of a three-headed thistle; the submitted form is a bit too naturalistic for ready identification. 01/93

Margaret Sayher. Device. Vert, a fess wreathed Or and purpure between three stags courant Or.


This conflicts with Robertson (Papworth 723): Vert, a fess between three bucks in full course Or. Wreathing is a single treatment of the fess; the evidence suggests it's considered a tincture change (Or vs. bendy Or and purpure, in this case), with the "invected line" considered artistic license. The only period examples of wreathing are to be found, naturally enough, on the charge known as the wreath or torse: it could be drawn with the folds of cloth bulging the edge, or as an annulet compony. See the examples in Foster, p.121; Parker, pp.308, 631; and Guillim, p.291. If, for the definitive case of wreathing, the invected edge is considered artistic license, then it cannot count for difference here. The wreathing of the fess is worth a single CD, insufficient to bring it clear. 10/92

Margarete the Scholar. Device. Gules, in pale a daisy argent seeded Or and a book argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Collawyn Lughaidh O'Cearbhaill (SCA): Gules, two tablets conjoined in fess argent. When Collawyn's badge was registered, it was specifically noted that "the tablets lacked any difference from an open book argent" [LoAR of Jan 90, p.4]. There is thus a single CD, for the flower. 04/93

Margery of Kent. Device. Azure semy of bees argent, a beehive Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Sanders (Riestap): D'azur à une ruche d'or (Azure, a beehive Or). There's a single CD, for the addition of the semy bees. 8/93

Maria Adelina Garcia de Macjenkyne. Name.

The length of the name plus the manner of combining the Spanish and English elements cause this to be returned. She may use her husband's surname, even though there are some questions of its possible use in period: see the discussion of Macjenkyne under the registration of Logan Mersc Macjenkyne, elsewhere on this LoAR. But she must still do so in a valid manner, and we have no evidence that this long, awkward construction meets that requirement.


The custom of a Spanish woman changing her name upon marriage only took root within the last hundred years, which is out of period. Compound surnames of the form X de Y may be seen, but the second element is always a non-patronymic. (Note that Spanish-English cultural interaction is easily attested via various Tudor marriages; Philip of Spain and Bloody Mary spring to mind.) We suggest she drop the de, and perhaps one of the interior names. See the cover letter for a discussion of married names. 10/93

Maria Erika von Ossenheim. Device. Per bend sinister argent and sable, three roses in bend between two bendlets, all counterchanged, overall a label azure for difference.


This had been pended from the August meeting, to allow for receipt of permission to conflict with Anna Herold von Ossenheim. We've received neither a letter of permission nor a heraldic will from the latter; this must be returned for conflict. 11/92

Marian Loresinger. Device. Sable, a pall Or between an hourglass and two goblets argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Bertrand de Flammepoing (SCA): Sable, a pall Or fimbriated of flame proper. There's a CD for the secondary charges, but the fimbriation is worth no difference. 08/92

Marina la Perdu. Name.


The use of the Russian given name with the French epithet is in apparent violation of Rule III.2. We need evidence of regular period contact between Russia and France before we can register this name. (The grammar would also need to be corrected, to la Perdue.)


The submitter's armory was registered under the holding name Marique of the West. 01/93

Marinus, Barony of. Badge. Argent, a lily pad vert charged with a water lily blossom argent.


The lily is shown here in trian aspect, which has been disallowed for many years now. They should redraw it either in profile or affronty. 08/92

Marinus, Barony of. Order name for Coin of the Sea.


Per Rule III.1.b, order names must include "a designation that identifies the group". Coin of the Sea is not, by itself, an acceptable order name; we need to add Order of, Award of, etc. We'd also like to see documentation for this pattern of order names in period. 10/93

Marisela the Vintner. Name.


The given name was submitted as a variant of a feminized form of the Spanish masculine name Maricel. Unfortunately, the latter would not be pronounced with a hard S, according to Putnam's Spanish-English Dictionary: the CE combination is pronounced almost like a soft THE, with a lisp. We could accept the documented Marsella, or a hypothetical Maricela, but not a variant of a hypothetical that changes the pronunciation. The submitter permitted no corrections to grammar or spelling; however, as she did permit a holding name to be formed, her armory was registered under the name Barbara of Caer Anterth. 03/93

Marzellus vom Brandenberg. Name.


The conjunction is incorrect in this context: vom is a contraction of von dem, "of the". With a placename, the unmodified von "of" should be used. The submitter disallowed any changes whatsoever to the name; it must therefore be returned. 06/93

Mathgamain O'Brien. Device. Per pale argent and azure, two annulets interlaced in fess counterchanged.


Conflicts with Wakisaka Yasuharu (Hawley 85), Dark, two annulets linked in fess light. There's a CD for tincture (tincturelessness), including tincture divisions; but against tinctureless armory, the divisions of field or charges cannot be counted twice. 10/93

Matthew Aelfwine the Silent. Device. Per bend purpure and Or, a five-man morris board counterchanged.


As drawn, this is not a five-man morris board: it's the markings from a five-man morris board. The board would be essentially a delf (with artistic markings); the markings alone are unheraldic. Even under our relaxed standards of voiding, this is unacceptably "thin-line heraldry", returnable under Rule VIII.3.


FYI: Lord Dolphin has found evidence that the markings on this device belong to a six-man morris board, not five. He cites R.C. Bell's Board and Table Games From Many Civilizations, Volume 1, p.93. If the submitter has evidence of the board's use in five-man morris, we'd be interested in a copy. 03/93

Maximillian von Halstern. Household name for Haus Robbenschlage.


The household name is not grammatically correct; at best, it means "seal hammer", which does not appear to be a valid household name. Nor could we correct the grammar for the submitter's intended meaning -- since his forms do not state his intended meaning.


Clubbing baby seals is repugnant; making jokes about clubbing baby seals is merely in poor taste. However, as several commenters noted, this name seems expressly calculated to offend any listeners, which makes it an affront to courtesy. (Translating it into German does not remove the offense, any more than would translating Motherfucker into German.) 11/92

Meadhbh Ní Dhubháin Uí Chorbáin. Device. Per pale embattled vert and Or, a raven contourny wings addorsed argent and a rat sejant erect sable maintaining a ivy branch vert.


This submission has a number of problems, each of which need to be corrected. The embattlements on the line of partition are too small; they need to be drawn bolder. Neither charge is drawn in a correct heraldic position. The rat is drawn as a combination of rampant and statant erect. The bird is close to passant but the wing position is not recognizably addorsed. Additionally, the raven is drawn poorly, lacking the hairy feathers typical of the charge; it looks more like a gull than a raven. Please instruct the submitter as to the correct way to emblazon the components of this device. 9/93

Meaghan Catherine McKenna. Device. Purpure, a chevron erminois between two unicornate horses combattant, horns crossed in saltire, and a demi-sun issuant from base Or.


The charges in chief were blazoned as unicorns on the LOI. In fact, they are unicornate horses, which have been disallowed since at least Feb 85. Unicornate horses are not only a 20th Century fantasy rendition, they blur the distinctions between horses and genuine unicorns; for both reasons, they are unacceptable in SCA armory. Please have the client resubmit with genuine medieval unicorns: with beards, lions' tails, and tufted cloven hooves. 05/93

Medhbh O'Duibhdabhoireann of Clontarf. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A reremouse azure.


This still conflicts with the Mon of Komori Yamamoto (Hawley 57): Dark, a bat light. The Mon being considered equivalent to a tinctureless seal, there is a single CD for fieldlessness; but the second CD must come from some change other than tincture. Just as with her previous submission, this must be returned. 03/93

Meghan Pengwyn of Wynterwood. Badge. Purpure, two nude angels bendwise sinister, passant to sinister guardant argent.


The charges are angels, not cupids, as they aren't carrying a cupid's traditional bow and quiver of arrows. The angels' posture is not particularly heraldic, as evidenced by the number of suggestions for reblazoning them; neither volant nor rising is appropriate to humanoids. The above blazon was the closest we could devise, and it isn't all that accurate. The angels need to be in a blazonable posture. 09/92

Melisend de Chartres. Device resubmission. Purpure, a bend "indented" between a quill pen bendwise and a clarion argent.


The previous submission was returned Aug 92 for drawing the bend too narrow, the indentations too small. She's corrected those problems, but introduced another: the bend is indented on the sinister base end, but dancetty on the dexter chief end! The bend must be one or the other, if for no other reason than to check conflict.


One of the heralds at the meeting offered to redraw the submission, sending a copy to the client. The difficulty lay in not knowing the submitter's intent: did she want a bend indented, or a bend dancetty? We were given no clue, and since there's a CD between the two, it's not something to be left to chance or telepathy.


This must be returned for redrawing yet again: either as an undoubted bend indented, or as an undoubted bend dancetty. 01/93

Melisend de Chartres. Device. Purpure, a bend indented between a quill pen bendwise and a clarion argent.


The bend is not drawn in a period style: the indents are far too small, and the bend too narrow, to be identified from any distance. 08/92

Melusine d'Argent. Name and device. Per chevron rayonny purpure and vert, in chief a natural five-armed starfish argent.


Though it's been registered in the SCA, Melusine has not been documented as a period given name. The example closest to period is Melusina von der Schulenburg, cited in Withycombe, p.220; she was born in 1667, according to evidence presented for the submission of Melusine Whitcroft the Petite. Susequent registrations of Melusine have depended on this citation.


There are only a bare handful of Melusines registered, and the only documentation is post-1650; I think I can safely disallow the name, pending evidence that it's period. I'd be willing to believe it a variant form of Melisenda, Millicent -- but as it's also the name of a mythical monster, I'd like to see some evidence of its period use by humans.


The device has several problems. First, as drawn, the line of division is not recognizable as Per chevron (or anything else). Second, the natural starfish is not, to the best of our knowledge, a period heraldic charge; it seems to have started use in Victorian heraldry (Elvin, plate 32). Finally, if we reblazon the starfish as a mullet, this would conflict with the arms of Earle (Papworth 990): Paly of ten Or and gules, a mullet in chief argent. There would be just one CD, for the field. 10/92

Mengü of Cathanar. Household name for Iron Horde of Cathanar.


As in the case of the Company of the Checquered Shield of Western Seas (LoAR of 19 Jan 91), the use of the SCA branch name implies this is an official group of the Barony of Cathanar. As the submitter doesn't represent Cathanar, he may not style his household in a way that suggests official sanction. (If he has official sanction from Cathanar, the name should be registered to Cathanar.)


Normally, we'd delete the problematic part of the name, and register this as simply the Iron Horde, but that would then introduce conflicts. Specifically, it would conflict with the Iron Guard, a Rumanian fascist organization founded in 1924. Paramilitary and strongly anti-Semite, it played a major role in Rumanian history prior to and during World War II (including the assassination of one Premier and the installation of another). Since it's cited in several general references (New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.II, p.2135; 1991 Encyclopedia Britannica, vol.7, p.388), the Iron Guard is important enough to protect. (And in any case, I doubt the submitter would like a household name so close to a group whose atrocities offended even the Nazi Gestapo.)


As for the form of the name itself, it should be noted that the Mongol hordes were evidently named for colors, not materials; the Golden Horde wasn't so named because of an abundance of the precious metal. The White Horde and the Blue Horde, cited by Lord Clarion, reinforce this naming pattern. The OED cites the adjective iron "having the appearance of iron; of the colour of iron" from 1613, within our 50-year "grey zone" on documentation; Iron Horde is acceptable only as a very late-period translation of a Mongol term. The more period term for "iron-colored" would be irony. 09/92

Meri of the Bears. Device. Argent maily gules, a brown bear's head cabossed mounted on a wooden pole issuant from base proper.


The wooden pole was well-nigh invisible amidst the bear's head and complex field. Additionally, this could be construed as an overuse of proper charges. She might try resubmitting with honest heraldic tinctures. 01/93

Meridies, Kingdom of. Guild name for Saltare.


This was submitted as the name for the Kingdom dance guild. Unfortunately, the infinitive verb "to dance" (in English or in Latin) doesn't seem to be a valid group name. Similar guild names in period seem to have been straightforward descriptions of their craft: Company of Coopers, Baker's Guild, etc. We could see a bit more fanciful name, such as the Guild of St. Vitus or the Terpsichorean Guild. We could even see using the Latin saltare, properly conjugated, as part of a Latinized guild name. But the simple "to dance", with no noun or designator, cannot be accepted without more evidence than we've been given. 09/92

Meridies, Kingdom of. Badge. Azure, an owl's head cabossed argent.


(This was submitted as a badge for the Order of the Velvet Owl.) This conflicts with the device of Serena Lucia of the Peacemakers (SCA): Gyronny vert and Or, a snowy owl's head erased affronty proper (Nyctea scandiaca). There's a CD for the field, but no more. It also conflicts with the badge of John the Rhymer (SCA): Azure, a falcon's head couped reversed argent. There's a CD for the posture of the head, but none for its type -- in large part because the cabossed/guardant posture forms such a large part of the definition of an owl's face.


Against the badge of Merric of Stormgate (An owl's head cabossed argent, sustaining in its beak a candle fesswise azure lit at both ends proper), there's a CD for fieldlessness and a CD for the candle; a comparison of the emblazons showed the candle to be a significant charge. 7/93

Meridies, Kingdom of. Badge. Sable, an uncial M argent.


(This was submitted as a badge for the Order of the Bough of Meridies. Note that this is the registered form of the Order name.) This must be returned, for either of two reasons. First, the College does not register monograms, or any armory consisting solely of an alphanumeric symbol. (LoAR of Aug 84, p.5) Anyone has the right to use the letter M without regard to conflict; it can't be considered the private property of the Kingdom of Meridies.


Second, this conflicts with the badge of the British 6th AGRA (Military Ordinary #885): Sable, the symbol of the constellation Virgo argent. The difference between the Virgo glyph and the letter M isn't even worth a CD, let alone the Substantial Difference needed to clear the conflict here. 7/93

Meridies, Kingdom of. Badge. (fieldless) On a cartouche argent a mullet gules.


(This was submitted as a badge for the Order of the Stella Rubra.) The charges considered media for heraldic display -- the delf, lozenge, cartouche, etc. -- when used in a fieldless badge may not be charged. This ruling has been in force since 1986, and is itself reason enough for return. In this case, the badge gives the appearance of a display (on a cartouche) of the arms of Harpden (Papworth 989), Argent, a mullet gules; so this must be returned for conflict as well.


As a side note: the cartouche was drawn in this submission with pointed ends, not the rounded ends normal for the charge. We've registered this variant form in the past, usually blazoned a cartouche with pointed ends; the technical term for the shape is mandorla, or amygdaline aureole. (Metford's Dictionary of Christian Lore and Legend) 7/93

Michael David of Aran Island. Household name and badge for House of Aran. (fieldless) A mascle gyronny argent and azure.


The name conflicts with Aran Island, off the coast of Ireland. It's listed in general references (e.g. the 1991 E.Brit., vol.VI, p.516), so is important enough to protect. It also conflicts with the Earldom of Arran, in Scotland, whose name derives from a similar toponymic (ibid, p.585). In neither case is the designator (House of, Island, Earldom of) worth any difference.


The badge conflicts with the mon of Arima (Hawley 84): Dark, a mascle light. Mundane mon are treated as tinctureless armory for the purposes of counting conflict. There's a CD for tincturelessness, but per Rule X.4.d, the second needed CD must come from a category that doesn't involve tincture; the gyronny division of the mascle is thus worth no difference in this case. 8/93

Michael FitzGeoffrey. Badge. (fieldless) A cross potent argent, overall a mullet of eight points pierced gules within an annulet vert.

This was misblazoned (and misdrawn) on the LOI: the annulet was omitted. We would normally pend the badge to allow for commentary under the correct blazon, but the badge also suffers from the overuse of overall charges, obscuring the cross. It seemed best to return this, for consultation and redesign. 01/93

Michael McKenzie. Device. Argent, on a flame issuant from base gules a mountain argent, a chief nebuly azure.


This was blazoned on the LOI as a mountain argent enflamed gules. Unfortunately, it was not drawn in the usual period manner for a charge enflamed -- and would violate the Rule of Contrast if it were. See the cover letter for a more complete discussion on period enflaming.


The problem of contrast between the field and the mountain can be addressed by our reblazon, which makes the mountain a tertiary on the flame. However, the design still s uffers from a lack of identifiability: the red stripe, with white on either side, looks more like a récherché fess than an enflamed mountain. This must be returned for redrawing; we suggest using a dark-colored mountain with spurts of flame issuant, as in the examples of MacKenzie armory cited in the LOI. 06/93

Michael of the Two Peaks. Device. Sable, in chief two double-bitted axes in saltire argent, and in base two dragons' heads couped respectant Or.


Conflicts with the arms of Bellingford (Papworth 11): Sable, two battle-axes in saltire argent. The axes have roughly the same visual weight as the dragon's heads, so this is a single group of primary charges; there is a CD for adding the dragon's heads, but no more.


(Please note that the dragon's heads were blazoned in the LOI as argent; thus, there may be other conflicts that weren't caught by the commenters.)


When he resubmits, please have the submitter draw his dragon's heads in a more period style; as drawn, these are more reminiscent of creatures from Aliens. 08/92

Michael Ryan of York. Device. Argent semy of escallops azure, a centaur salient maintaining in one hand a bow sable and in the other a sheaf of arrows argent.


The centaur is in trian aspect, which is not permitted; and the argent arrows cannot be seen unless held against the centaur's flank, which is not a blazonable detail. This must be returned for redrawing at the very least. If he resubmits a similar design, the arrows should be of some tincture other than argent. 10/93

Michael Sevastos of Iconium. Name.


The LOI gave Sevastos as "the original form of Sebastian", which is not quite correct. Rather, the given name Sebastian is derived from an adjective meaning "from Sebasta", a town in Turkey. Sevastos or Sebastos is a Greek term, literally meaning "worshipped, reverenced, held in awe": Liddell & Scott's Greek-English Lexicon, p.631, define it as "The Latin Augustus, as a title applied to the Roman Emperor"; the usage is corroborated in L.G. Pine's Titles: How the King Became His Majesty, p.38. (The town Sebasta, the source of the given name Sebastian, was named after Augustus, as was Sebastye in Palestine.) The application of Sevastos to people, then, seems to be restricted to the "Roman" Emperors of East and West -- and thus may not be registered without better evidence of its use by commoners. Unfortunately, the submitter forbade us to delete that portion of his name; the submission as a whole must therefore be returned. 06/93

Michaela de Romeny. Badge for House Battleaxe. Per pale purpure and sable, a battleaxe fesswise argent and in chief an arch of five bezants.


It has been ruled that an arch of charges is not period heraldic style. The ruling was originally for an arch of stars : "Stars surrounding only part of a charge is fantasy art." [BoE, 28 Sept 84] It has since been extended to any charges "in arch". She might try simply putting the bezants in chief. 10/92

Micheil de Mar. Name.


This conflicts with Michael de la Mare, registered July 88. 12/92

Micheil de Mar. Name.


Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 06/93

Middle, Kingdom of the. Name and badge for Order of the Cavendish Knot. (fieldless) A Cavendish knot vert.


The name conflicts with the Company of the Knot, a monarchical order of knighthood founded in Naples in 1352 (Boulton, The Knights of the Crown, p. 211). We have returned names for conflict against this ere now: cf. the Company of the Steel Knot (Rowena le Sarjent, LoAR of Jan 92).


The badge conflicts with the badge of the House of Savoy (Gayre's Heraldic Standards, p.95): A Savoy (or Cavendish) knot. The two knots are identical; as the badge is tinctureless, we can get but a single CD between it and this submission. (As a side note: Several modern heraldry texts describe the Cavendish knot, but none explicitly give it as the badge of the Cavendish family. Indeed, texts from before World War II -- Fox-Davies' books, Woodward, Parker, early editions of Boutell -- don't mention the Cavendish knot at all. Either it was only recently uncovered as an old Cavendish badge, or else the knot itself is of 20th Century provenance! It's moot, given the exact conflict with the Savoy knot, but someone may decide it merits further research nonetheless.)


Conflict was also cited against other "knotty" badges: e.g. the badge of Wake (Heraldic Badges 152), A Wake knot, and the badge of Kemrith Danil (SCA), Argent, a Bourchier knot vert. In the cases of charges nowed (e.g. serpents nowed, or lions with nowed tails), we've held that "knots is knots" and granted no difference for the exact form of knotwork. In cases where the single primary charge is a recognized heraldic knot, however, we can see granting a CD between certain types of knots. In particular, the Savoy/Cavendish knot is sufficiently different from any other standard knot that I would call this submission clear of the cited conflicts. 8/93

Middle Kingdom. Title for Once Pursuivant.


This conflicts with Caer Oncia, registered to Sula von Pferdenthal. The designator is transparent, and counts for no difference. 12/92

Middleford, Shire of. Badge. Argent, a bridge of one arch sable and a chief embattled gules.


Conflicts with Oldcastle (Parker 95), Argent, a castle (or tower) triple-towered sable, chained transverse the port Or. There's a single CD, for the chief; we grant no difference for castle vs. bridge, considering both to be towers connected by masonwork. 9/93

Miguel Tamut de Aldea. Device. Sable, a "Japanese" crane displayed aversant Or between three compass stars argent.


(The name was registered Sept 92.) The primary charge was blazoned as a Japanese crane in the LOI to insure a specific stylization. In general, we don't blazon the exact nationality of the drawing style, preferring to leave that to the artist; the few exceptions to this rule are just that, exceptions. In this case, the drawing style has robbed the crane of all the characteristics that let it be identified as a crane: the lack of long legs, the unorthodox posture, the collapse of the sinuous neck. While we don't necessarily agree that any bird will conflict with any other bird in the same posture, we have to admit that this crane, robbed of its identifying traits, will conflict with an eagle. The device therefore conflicts with the arms of Gayton (Papworth p. 304), Sable, an eagle displayed Or, as cited in the LOI.

If he resubmits with the crane drawn in a recognizable posture, it will clear this conflict. Note that this will almost certainly entail using a European emblazonry style, rather than a Japanese style. 9/93

Mikhail the Varangian. Badge. Azure, three drinking horns interlaced in a triskelion, pierced by their own tips argent.


This conflicts with Wyrley (Papworth 951): Azure, three bugle horns argent. There's a single CD, for the arrangement of the horns. 10/92

Mikhail the Varangian. Device resubmission. Argent, a bend disjoint gules between a Russian Orthodox cross botonny sable and a boot reversed gules, a bordure embattled sable.


The bend was submitted as rompu, which it is not: in the submission of Connor MacNicol (LoAR of June 89), a bend of this type was blazoned disjoint, following the example in the glossary section of Rietstap. At that time, the bend disjoint was ruled similar to the bend bevilled, and equally "Society-compatible"; however, it was also ruled unorthodox, and acceptable only in simple designs. (Connor's submission was returned for fimbriating the bends disjoint, which added "an unacceptable degree of confusion to the visual effect, which seriously reduce[d] the overall identifiability of the unusual bend." The same argument applies here: though Mikhail's submission has a technical "complexity count" of seven, the unorthodox bend combined with three other types of charge and a complex line of division is enough to render this unacceptable.


The submitter has had a hard time of it. His first submission (Argent, a bend gules between a Russian Orthodox cross sable and a boot reversed gules) was returned for conflict. His resubmission (adding a plain bordure sable) was returned for a different conflict. Making the bend and bordure complex has removed the conflicts, but has rendered the device non-period in style. Through it all, the cross and boot have remained unchanged. If these elements of the design are most important to the submitter, perhaps he might concentrate on using those -- without a bend or bordure. Such a redesign could greatly improve his chances of registration. 08/92

Mikhail the Varangian. Device resubmission. Per bend potenty Or and argent, a Russian Orthodox cross botonny sable and a boot reversed gules within a bordure potenty sable.


The complex line of division is indistinguishable from any distance. As in the case of Landric Daegmaer (LoAR of Aug 92), a complex line of division between two metals or two colors may be returnable for unidentifiability, per Rule VIII.3, regardless of whether the line is obscured by a charge. It only matters that the field portions have so little contrast that the complex line cannot readily be identified from a distance. That appears to be the case here. Have him resubmit without a complex line of partition. 10/93

Mikhail Vojaka Kazimirov. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) An annulet dancetty Or surmounted by an angel passant proper, wings displayed argent, vested gules, wearing a breastplate Or, maintaining a sword proper.


The previous submission, without the annulet, was returned Aug 92 for conflict with the badge of France's Order of St. Michael. The addition of the annulet removes that conflict, but introduces stylistic problems: The annulet is too thin to be readily identified. Moreover, the angel is just barely overall, which has been reason for return in the past; and if the angel were drawn more fully surmounting the annulet, the latter might be obscured to the point of unidentifiability. Either way, this must be returned for redesign.


If he resubmits with this motif, he should consider drawing the annulet a good deal thicker, with the angel confined within and abutting its inner edge. Simplifying the design, perhaps by removing a few tinctures, would also be advisable. (If he'd like to explicitly blazon this as the Archangel Michael, so as to preserve the allusion to his name, he's welcome to do so.) 8/93

Mikhail Vojaka Kazimirov. Badge. (fieldless) An angel passant proper, wings displayed argent, vested gules, wearing a breastplate Or, maintaining a sword enflamed proper.


This conflicts with the badge of the Order of St. Michael, founded 1469: The Archangel Michael passant, wings displayed inverted, brandishing a sword. The Statutes establishing the Order define the badge as "a pendant image of St. Michael in gold, and this is to be hung around the neck" on a collar of gold escallops. The actual medallion is of bas-relief gold -- essentially tinctureless. There's another form of the badge, the "lesser Michael", an enamel image worn on a plain gold chain or silken lace: this shows Michael in the same pose, but tinctured proper. Either way, there's a CD for fieldlessness, but no more. (There's some leeway in depicting the Archangel: some versions of the Order badge show his wings displayed, others displayed inverted; some show him turned to sinister; some show him vanquishing Satan or a dragon; one shows him with scales of justice in his other hand. He is most often shown as blazoned above, however, and this is definitely a conflict. All of the above is from Onori e Glorie: Sovrano Militare Ordine by Antonio Spada, Grafo edizioni, 1980.) 08/92

Mildgyth of Loch Salann. Device. Per chevron sable and argent, two garbs argent and a heart purpure.


Conflicts with Darkin Armorsbane (SCA): Per chevron sable and argent, two garbs and a drinking horn counterchanged. There is at most one CD for changes to the bottommost charge of a group of three charges 2&1. 10/92

Miles Ravenslock d'Arcy. Household name and badge for House Corbeau Rouge. (fieldless) A tower Or surmounted by a raven rising, wings displayed gules, grasping an arrow sable.


The name conflicts with the Order of the Corbie, registered to the Barony of the Mountain Freehold. The designator (House, Order) is transparent; and the addition of the adjective is insufficient difference, per Rule V.2.


It had been announced (LoAR cover letter of 3 Aug 92) that, starting with this meeting, we would no longer register fieldless badges using overall charges. Except for designs with long, skinny charges (e.g. a sword, blade surmounted by an anvil), in general that ban is still in effect. The badge is also uncomfortably close to the device of Orric Blackthorne (SCA): Pean, a tower triple-towered Or, surmounted by a falcon displayed, head to sinister gules. There's a CD for the field; prior precedents grant no difference between tower and tower triple-towered, nor between a raven and a falcon in similar postures. While technically this may not be a conflict, the submitter should definitely be aware of it when he resubmits. 01/93

Miriam de Xaintrailles. Device. Per fess flory counter-flory azure and Or, issuant from chief a demi-sun Or, in base a lion dormant sable.


The flory counter-flory line is not correctly drawn here. While the treatment was applied to ordinaries in period (e.g. the double tressures of the arms of Scotland), I've found no period instances of its use as a complex field division. The closest analogies are the trefly counter-trefly division of von Hillinger and the per fess indented, points flory division of Woodmerton. Both of these models require the flory counter-flory line to be drawn with demi-fleurs, as shown in the margin. As drawn in this submission, the "complex line" is actually a group of charges, counterchanged across the field division, with half of them inverted. This is not readily blazonable, and doesn't fit the period pattern for complex lines of division. (The illustration from Fox-Davies' Complete Guide to Heraldry, from which the submitter's emblazon is taken, is cited in no dated armory.)


If she resubmits with a correct flory counter-flory line, this should be acceptable. 01/93

Miriel Gwenddwr Ty Aranell. Badge. Azure, a cross moline voided, a bordure engrailed argent.


Conflicts with the arms of Gailie (Papworth 608): Azure, a cross moline lozenge pierced argent. There's a CD for the bordure. The voiding of Miriel's cross, and the piercing of Gailie's, are considered equivalent to tertiary charges for the purposes of counting difference. Had both armories used a cross throughout -- that is, an heraldic ordinary -- then the change in type of tertiary would be worth a second CD. But a cross variant used as a charge -- e.g. a cross crosslet, cross formy, etc. -- is not an ordinary per se. This allows us to apply Rule X.2, Complete Difference of Charge, between cross variants; but it also means that we cannot apply Rule X.4.j.ii to the surcharges on cross variants. We therefore can grant no difference for the type of tertiary (that is, the exact shape of the piercing/voiding). 04/93

Mistylla of the Misty Isle. Badge. (fieldless) Two mice salient respectant inverted, tails nowed together Or.


The charges are not in a blazonable heraldic posture; not really being salient, passant, statant or couchant. Additionally, the College has judged inverted creatures to be unacceptable style, barring documentation of this practice in period heraldry. 9/93

Monique Anne Defourneaux de Lyon. Device. Or, on a pile invected between four garden roses purpure slipped and leaved vert, a lion salient contourny reguardant Or.


The invecting isn't deep enough to be visible from any distance. Period armorial art used large, bold lines, so the arms could be identified from a distance. This must be returned for redrawing, per Rule VIII.3. 8/93

Mor Loft. Device. Or, in chief a wooden bow fesswise proper surmounted by two arrows inverted in saltire, and in base a phoenix sable rising from flames proper, within a bordure sable.


The bow was blazoned sable on the LOI, but the full emblazon showed it to be brown wood. As such, the device contains four tinctures and four types of charge, which is right at the edge of acceptable complexity as defined in Rule VIII.1.a. Added to the fact that there are three types of charge in the primary charge group (also disallowed per VIII.1.a), and the whole becomes unacceptable. 09/92

Morat d'Orleans. Name.


The documentation in the Letter of Intent, from Dauzat, does not support the use of Morat as a given name. It is postulated that Morat is a variant of Maurat, the name of a hamlet. No documentation is provided showing that a variant of a place-name is a valid personal name. The submitter will need to add a given name. 9/93

Mordenvale, Shire of. Device transfer (to the Shire of Llynn Arian). Per chevron inverted vert and sable, a chevron inverted between a lymphad, sails furled, and a cup within a laurel wreath, all Or.


Transfer returned. There were no forms included for the action. (We need at least new submission forms with the name and device of the new owners of each piece of armory on them. Note that a transfer is really two actions, an offer and an acceptance. Both are needed to effect the transfer.) Even had there been forms, this action is fraught with problems. The LoI's commentary on the transaction between Llyn Arian and Mordenvale said in one place that it was an "exchange" of devices, and in another that the two groups were merging; these cannot both be true. For this reason, even had there been forms, this would have been pended to allow Vesper and the people of the (new) Shire of Mordenvale to decide what they want done with their current armory.


The problem, as we see it, is this: if Llyn Arian is merging with Mordenvale (the new group so formed to still be called Mordenvale), then the Shire of Llyn Arian as an independent entity ceases to exist. It therefore cannot have any armory. The old Mordenvale armory cannot be retained as a badge, because only devices may contain laurel wreaths. It cannot be retained as a device, because only one device may be registered to any primary name. No matter how this is resolved, both of these devices cannot continue to exist as they are. Please consult with the submitters and determine what they really want before resubmitting. 10/93

Mordenvale, Shire of. Device transfer (from the Shire of Llynn Arian). Per fess gules and argent, a fess embattled sable between a demi-sun Or issuant from the line of division and a laurel wreath gules.


Transfer returned. (See previous submission for commentary.) 10/93

Moreach nic Mhaolain. Device. Quarterly sable and Or, a lion rampant guardant counterchanged brandishing a sword argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Bing (Papworth 93): Quarterly sable and Or, in the first quarter a lion rampant guardant of the second. There's a CD for the placement of the lion, from center to dexter chief; but the change of tincture is required by the change of placement, and so cannot be counted as the second necessary CD. (A lion quarterly Or and sable could not be entirely on the sable portion of the field; if the lion is moved there, its tincture must change.)


Or, alternatively, there's a CD for the tincture of the lion, from quarterly Or and sable to Or; but as a solid Or lion could not be centered on the field, the change of placement is required by the change of tincture. Either the tincture or the placement may be counted as a difference; but not both, since to change one requires us to change the other.


I confess not being satisfied with this return, but could find no way around it as the Rules now stand. She might consider changing the field. 08/92

Morgaine Brisen. Household name for Weasel Works.


The household name doesn't seem to follow known period usage. The word works appears to be a late-period term referring to a factory; when modified with a noun, the noun is considered the product of the factory (e.g. iron works). A weasel works, then, would not be a factory owned by a man named Weasel, but a factory that made weasels. This appears highly implausible, even as a metaphor. We need some evidence of period compatibility before we can register this name. 01/93

Morgan ferch Cennydd. Badge. (fieldless) On a hawk's head erased argent a gout de sang.


This conflicts with the badge of Manfried von Falkenmond (SCA): (tinctureless) A falcon's head couped and hooded quarterly, charged in base with a crescent. Although there is a CD for fieldlessness, there is no additional difference obtainable for the change in type of the tertiary charge or the changes to the primary charge.


When she resubmits, please instruct the submitter on the correct way to draw an erased head: boldly, with large ragged edges. 01/93

Morgan Rowantree. Device. Purpure, a bend sinister wavy between in chief a fox sejant to sinister and in base a crescent and a crescent inverted Or.


The wavy line of the bend sinister is not bold enough; it cannot be seen or identified from a distance. This is in itself a reason for return, per Rule VIII.3. When she resubmits, we'd suggest she draw the fox more vulpine, less like a caricature.


The secondaries are technically not a group of dissimilar charges ("slot-machine heraldry"), and not ground for return; however, the design isn't the ideal period style, and would be considerably improved by deleting one of the crescents. 03/93

Morgan the Falconer. Device. Azure, a falcon displayed, on a chief Or a rose purpure.


This conflicts with the arms of du Pont de Nuisement (Rietstap): D'azur à l'aigle d'or, au chef du même (Azure, an eagle Or and a chief of the last). There is a single CD, for the tertiary on the chief. 01/93

Morgan Wolfsinger. Badge. (fieldless) A wolf sejant ululant contourny argent.


This conflict with the badge of the Barony of Carolingia (SCA): Vert chapé barry wavy azure and argent, a vixen sejant guardant contourny argent. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but none for the posture of the beast's head. 7/93

Morgana Bro Morgannwg. Badge. (fieldless) On a flame proper, a laurel sprig vert.


As drawn, this is not an heraldic flame proper, but a flame Or, marked as though shadowed gules (which is about the closest I could render it). She needs to redraw this as a correct flame proper, or else solid Or (which may introduce new conflicts). Note that, in this case, the coloration of flame proper is defined by the green tertiary charge: gold interior, red exterior. 10/92

Morgant Lawdda. Device. Azure, in pale a crocodile statant argent and three sinister hands two and one Or.


Conflicts with the arms of Fane (Papworth 907): Azure, three dexter gauntlets Or. There is only once CD, for the addition of the crocodile.


The crocodile was blazoned on the LOI as coward. This is not strictly correct: coward means "with the tail between the hind legs", whereas this crocodile is standing with all four feet on its tail. If the submitter intends a coward crocodile, please instruct her on its correct depiction. 8/93

Moses von dem Falken. Device. Argent chaussé, an angel azure.


The same design was previously returned, on the LoAR of Dec 90, for conflict with the arms of Cressall (Papworth 1023), Azure, on a pile argent three crescents in pale proper [sic]. The conflict is still valid: we grant no difference between Argent chaussé azure and Azure, a pile argent. Conflict must therefore be checked as though this were blazoned Azure, on a pile argent an angel azure; we count a single CD, for the changes to the tertiary group. 8/93

Muireann ní Riordáin. Device. Vert, on a bend sinister argent between a sun and an increscent Or, a lizard tergiant azure.


This conflicts with the device of Serena of Bagulay (SCA): Vert, a bend sinister azure fimbriated argent between in dexter chief three lozenges conjoined in fess and in sinister base a bell Or. Serena's device could equally well be blazoned Vert, on a bend sinister argent between a bar couped and lozenged and a bell Or, a scarpe azure; and by that blazon, this is a definite conflict under the Rules. There is a CD for type of secondary charges; but because this is not a "simple case" as defined by Rule X.4.j.ii, change of type alone of tertiary is not worth the second CD needed. 09/92

Myfanwy Cymraes. Badge. (fieldless) An increscent and a decrescent in fess argent surmounted by a rose vert.


The use of overall charges in fieldless badges was disallowed in the Jan 93 LoAR; they render the underlying charges unrecognizable, where the whole purpose of heraldry is identification. In this instance, where the "crescents" were drawn to resemble canoes, any further lack of identifiability becomes doubly unacceptable. 06/93

Myles of Falkon Hold. Badge. (fieldless) In fess a heart supported by a pair of hands issuant from the flanks argent.


Though blazoned on the LoI as couped, the hands are actually issuant from the edge. This is not permissible on a fieldless badge. Please have him resubmit with genuinely couped charges.


Claddagh rings (also called fede rings or friendship rings) are found in period in a variety of forms. (David Hinton, Medieval Jewellery, plates 13, 14) The motif is quite period. The claddagh ring normally used today shows the heart conjoined to a crown; so even were it a protected design, this submission would be clear of it. 10/93

Myrrddin mab y Ddrraig Goch. Name.


The name has a minor spelling problem: neither Myrddin nor ddraig should use the double-R. Far more troublesome was the allusion to the sorcerer Merlin, of Arthurian legend. The submitted name translates as "Merlin, son of the Red Dragon". Depending on the version of the legend one prefers, Merlin was either the son of Satan (whose symbol, according to Revelations 12:9, was a dragon), or the son of Aurelius, High King of Britain (whose symbol, as betokened by the title Pendragon, was a dragon). The fact that the Red Dragon is the badge of Wales, often supposed to be the source of the Merlin legend, only strengthens the allusion. The submitted name is simply too strongly suggestive of Merlin the enchanter, and must be returned for that reason. 8/93

Nadya Gornastaevna Chorkova. Device. Purpure, a ferret statant erect argent maintaining a sword proper, all within five bezants in annulo.


This conflicts with Marie of Erin (SCA): Purpure, a mink rampant argent, orbed gules, armed Or. There's a CD for the addition of the bezants, but nothing for the mink's posture or the maintained charge. 09/92

Nahrun Kabirun, Shire of. Order name for Le Garde Méridional.

The name must be returned for two reasons. First, we received no submission forms for this name. Second, if this indeed a "secondary [?] order name", as stated in the LOI, then the Shire may not register it: only branches with ceremonial heads (Baronies, Principalities and Kingdoms) may register orders and awards. This follows from the section of Corpora (VII.B.4) that permits only royalty and Territorial Baronage to bestow awards.


Please note that, as submitted, the name means "the Southern Guardsman". The French for "the Southern Guard" (i.e. a corps of watchmen) would use the feminine: la Garde Méridionale. 03/93

Nakamura Yuki. Badge. Vert, on a fan Or, two fans in pale vert.


No emblazon forms were included. This is being returned without consideration of the possible conflict with Margaret Rose O'Malley (SCA), Vert, on an escallop inverted Or, a garden rose gules slipped and leaved vert. Any resubmission should address this problem. 10/93

Nasir Abd-al-Qanah. Name resubmission and device. Quarterly sable and purpure, a cross bottonny between in chief two camels statant Or.


This gentle's previous name submission (Nasir Abd-al-Kaniel) was returned Sept 91 for lack of documentation on the byname. He has resubmitted it as Abd-al-Qanah -- with exactly the same absence of documentation as before. No support was given for Qanah as the Arabic for "spear" (Lord Clarion's sources translate the latter as harba, harbi); nor was support given for the usage "Servant-of-the-X" applied to anything but one of the attributes of Allah, of which "the spear" does not appear to be included. Without documentation, this must again be returned.


The submitter's name form did not permit any changes that would alter the meaning of his name, so no holding name could be constructed. (Douglas of Golden Sea would certainly change the meaning of the name.) The device must therefore be returned as well. 07/92

Nathair Airgid, Shire of. Device. Gyronny pean and gules, a bird-winged pithon erect, its tail environed of a laurel wreath argent.


The field is gyronny of two dark tinctures, which is disallowed per Rule VIII.2.b.iv. Additionally, we received no petition of support from the populace for this device. 10/92

Nicole-Julienne Laviolette. Device. Azure semy-de-lys argent, on a pale of three fusils Or between a pair of wings argent, three lilies gules, slipped and leaved vert.


The College was nearly unanimous in considering this submission too complex. It has four types of charge, and five tinctures, which exceeds the standard of complexity outlined in Rule VIII.1.a. This must be returned for simplification; she might consider deleting the wings. 05/93

Nihonyama, Port of. Name and device. Per fess wavy Or and azure, a cormorant volant to sinister sable and a laurel wreath Or.


Name and device submission withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 03/93

Nikolai of Trakai. Badge. (fieldless) A double cross sable fimbriated argent.


Conflicts with Lorraine Marcus (SCA), Quarterly vert and Or, a cross of Lorraine sable; and the mundane arms of Marcel (Woodward), Argent, a cross of Lorraine sable. In each case, there's a CD for fieldlessness; there's no difference for the fimbriation, or for the purely artistic variation between doube-cross and cross of Lorraine (or even patriarchal cross). 10/93

Nils Rixon. Device. Argent, on a bend sinister sable between two boar's heads "proper", three goblets palewise argent.


The boar's heads were blazoned sable on the LOI, but colored brown on the full emblazon. Unfortunately, that makes them unblazonable: they aren't proper, for boars in nature are dark-grey to black in color. Nor does there seem to be such a thing as a brown boar that could be rendered in this coloring. With no way to blazon the tincture of the heads, this must be returned. 10/92

Novia the Widow. Device change. Argent vetû sable, a black widow spider displayed proper between four hourglasses gules.


The black widow spider does not appear to have been known to period Europeans. It didn't even get the name until the early 20th Century; and it appears to have been introduced into America in the late 19th Century (from China, according to the best speculations). Without evidence that the black widow spider was known to period Europeans, it may not be registered. This was pointed out in the commentary during the gentle's last submission; it was confirmed (in a separate case) on the LoAR of April 92, p.24.


You might suggest to the lady that, between her current name and device (black spider between red hourglasses), her point comes across well enough. 07/92

Numira al Nasifa Bint Abdullah min Dimashq. Name.


The name is insufficiently documented. Numira wasn't documented as a given name, or indeed as any Arabic word; the submitter documented nimr "tiger", but showed no connection between it and Numira. Nasifah is documented as a given name, but not as an epithet (which the article al- would imply). Finally, while min Dimashq "out of Damascus" may be grammatically correct, the normal Arabic idiom would be al-Dimashqi "the Damascene". The submitter allowed no corrections; pending evidence of correct period construction, this must be returned.


The device was registered under the holding name Kim of Loch Salann. 8/93

Odinel Reidleck. Device. Quarterly gules and sable, a dragon passant contourny argent.


This conflicts with the device of Arria Maior (SCA): Lozengy sable and Or, a dragon passant to sinister argent. There is a single CD, for the field. 08/92

Olaf Eriksson Örnklo. Device. Or, an eagle's jamb erased sable, a chief urdy azure.


This conflicts with the arms of Holleufer (Rietstap): Or, an eagle's leg couped à la quisse sable. There's a CD for the chief, but no more. 08/92

Olaf Ösplund Frä Östersund. Name.


No documentation was cited to support the submitter's claim that Ösplund was a period Swedish surname; we might accept the Swedish Asplund "aspen grove" as a surname, but we'd want to see evidence for variant spellings. The city of Östersund was not founded until 1786 (Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer, p.1397), so he cannot claim to have been born there in period. Finally, the preposition should not be capitalized, and may even be incorrect Swedish idiom; Lord Palimpsest suggests fraan (modern från) as the appropriate term.


The device was registered under the name Olaf of Forgotten Sea. 10/92

Olwen de Montgomery. Badge. Per pale argent and azure, a tyger passant gules.


This conflicts with Lutwyche, Or, a heraldic tiger passant gules (Papworth, p.97). There is only one CD for the change of the field. 9/93

One Thousand Eyes, Barony of. Name resubmission for the Order of the Mirror.


This conflicts with the Order of the Polished Mirror, of the Barony of Black Diamond. The deletion of the adjective is insufficient difference, per Rule V.2. 10/92

One Thousand Eyes, Barony of. Name resubmission for the Order of the Opus.


This technically conflicts with Opus, the major character in the nationally syndicated comic strips Bloom County and Outland. Though we hate to admit it, Opus is probably better known than most of the historical figures we'd protect without question; per the Administrative Handbook (p.3), that makes him worthy of protection. See the cover letter for more details on such "popular culture" conflicts. 10/92

One Thousand Eyes, Barony of. Name for the Order of the Argent Peacock.


This conflicts with the heraldic title of the Peacock Pursuivant, in the West Kingdom. The addition of the adjective is insufficient difference, per Rule V.2. 10/92

Ördôg Magyar Béla. Device. Azure, a demi-wolf argent issuant from a trimount vert, holding in its mouth a vol Or.


Conflicts with the arms of Knudsen (Rietstap): D'azur à un loup naissant d'argent (Azure, a demi-wolf argent). There's a CD for adding the trimount, but none for the "held" charge.


This submission engendered no little discussion: while the green trimount on the blue field violates Rule VIII.2.b.i, there is considerable evidence that such usage is nonetheless period. See the cover letter for a fuller discussion of this issue. 10/92

Oriana d'Auney. Badge. (fieldless) A rose per pale Or and vert.


This conflicts with the mon of Hirayama (Hawley 27): Dark, a cherry blossom light. There's a CD for tincturelessness, but no further difference for anything relating to tincture, including lines of division; and no difference between Hirayama's rendition of a cherry blossom (complete with five petals, barbing and seeding) and an honest heraldic rose. 7/93

Oriana d'Auney. Device. Vert, three roses and a bordure embattled Or.


Conflicts with the arms of des Marets d'Allart (Rietstap): Vert, three roses Or. There's a single CD, for the bordure. 01/93

Ormr Festagarmr. Device. Sable, a snake involved argent between three double-bitted axes Or.


The device conflicts with the badge of the U.S. 1st Corps (Military Ordinary #21): Sable, an annulet argent. There is no difference between the serpent involved, as drawn here, and an annulet; there's a single CD, for the addition of the axes. 05/93

Osnath Rachel bat Eleazar ha-Levi. Name.


This infringes on the registered name of Eleazar ha-Levi: it claims a specific relationship, disallowed per Rule V.5. The fact that Eleazar ha-Levi is the submitter's father does not permit her to make the claim without his permission -- any more than she could register his arms with a label, without permission. We need a letter of permission before we can register the name.


FYI: The given name was spelled Osnath on the LOI, but Osnah on the forms. The usual English transliteration of the name of Joseph's wife (Genesis 41:45) is Asenath. The submitter documented variant forms, including Osnat and Asnat, but not Osnah. Examples of Hebrew names ending in either T or H are not to the point here: Asenath was an Egyptian lady, not a Hebrew. If the client intends to resubmit as Osnah, we'd like some evidence for that spelling. 05/93

Osric Logan. Badge. Per bend sinister argent and sable, a skull gules within a bordure counterchanged.


The badge's charges are not drawn in a medieval style: the bordure is too narrow, and the skull is drawn as Australopithicine. (Compare this to the A. boisei skull shown in Leakey's Origins, p.106.) We might excuse emblazonry problems with a note to the artist; but when all the charges of a submission must be redrawn, we have no compunction about returning it. 11/92

Outlands, Kingdom of the. Badge. Vert, a stag's attires Or surmounted by a rapier argent.


This conflicts with the arms of van der Haeghen (Rietstap): De sinople à une ramure de cerf d'or (Vert, a stag's attires Or). There's a single CD, for the addition of the overall charge. 03/93

Owen FitzRobert DeClare. Name change (from Owain of the March of the Unicorn).


This submission claims relationship with Robert de Clare (d.1134), 1st Earl of Clare, founder of the baronial house of FitzWalter and steward to King Henry I. The figure is found in general biographical references (e.g. Webster's New Biographical Dictionary, p.212), and therefore is worthy of protection. This must be returned, per Rule V.5. 01/93

Pádraig Ó Raghailligh of Dreenan. Device. Or, a sword gules transfixing a heart inverted sable within an orle of trefoils vert.


The inversion and transfixing of the heart make it difficult to identify from a distance. This is particularly apparent from the full-size emblazon: the submitter has tinctured the quillons of the sword sable, making the central charge indistinguishable from a card-pique. Such visual confusion is contrary to the purposes of heraldry.


If he redesigns this to maintain identifiability of all the charges, it should be acceptable. We suggest, for a start, setting the heart upright. 05/93

Parthalán MacPhail. Device. Or, a bend sinister vert between a hornless unicorn rampant contourny gules and a quatrefoil slipped vert.


The charge in chief was blazoned as a horse, but in fact is a hornless unicorn: it has a lion's tail, cloven hooves, and a beard -- all the attributes of a unicorn except the horn. Lord Crescent is correct in noting that the same rationale banning unicornate horses should also ban hornless unicorns. In either case, the distinction between genuine horses and honest unicorns is blurred; if we wish to grant period difference between these charges, we must insist on period emblazons. This must be returned for redrawing.


The primary charge was blazoned as a bend on the LOI. This would have caused the submission to be pended, had there been no immediate reason for return. Should he resubmit with this motif, please have him draw the ordinary a bit wider. 8/93

Patricia Philomena de Saint Clément. Device. Gules, an anchor Or, on a chief potenty argent three spirals sable.


There are two problems with this submission. First, the potenty line on the chief is drawn much too small; it would not be visible from any distance. Heraldry being a means of identification, its motifs should be drawn large, bold and visible. Second, the spiral does not appear to be an acceptable charge; a previous attempt at registration (under the blazon gurges couped) was returned Oct 90. This must be redesigned. 12/92

Patrick Andreas Ross. Device. Sable, a griffin segreant atop a crescent inverted, maintaining a sun and a sword argent, a bordure Or.


No forms were received for this submission. 11/92

Patrick Angus Flynn. Device. Azure, on a bend sinister argent between a standing balance and an open book Or, three keys palewise sable.


This conflicts with Michael Anwyl (SCA): Azure, on a bend sinister argent between two suns Or, three pheons palewise inverted sable. Patrick's submission uses dissimilar charges around the bend, so it doesn't qualify as "simple armory" per the definition of Rule X.4.j.ii; therefore, change in type alone of tertiaries is not worth a CD. The only difference that can be granted is for type of secondaries.


When he resubmits, please instruct him not to draw the book in trian aspect (three-quarter view); that alone is grounds for return. 03/93

Patrick Drake. Device. Sable, a unicorn rampant to sinister argent within an orle flory on the outer edge Or.


This must be returned, for either of two reasons. The first is that the orle flory has been disallowed for SCA use: it's too reminiscent of the double tressure flory counter-flory, which is an augmentation from the Scots crown. This precedent has been affirmed as recently as the LoAR of Sept 89. Indeed, given period renditions of the arms of Scotland with an orle flory instead of a double tressure flory counter-flory (e.g. Siebmacher, plate 2), and given a recent statement from the Lyon Office of Scotland declining to register orles flory without the Queen's express command, the precedent seems worth keeping.


The second reason is that we've received no archive copy for this submission. Even were everything else in order, it would still be returned. 8/93

Paul Franz von Drachenschlosse. Badge. Sable fretty Or, a winged tower argent.


Conflicts with the arms of Becher (Papworth 883): Sable fretty Or. The fretwork being considered a charge (v. LoAR cover letter of 10 Nov 92), there's a single CD for the addition of the overall charge. 01/93

Pavel Feodorovich Strelkov. Device. Azure, on a saltire between four mullets argent, four arrows, points to center sable.


Conflicts with Anderson (Papworth 1076): Azure, a saltire between three mullets and in base a crescent argent. There's a CD for the tertiaries, but not for changing one of a group of four charges. 11/92

Peggy of Tempest Hill. Device. Or, two cauldrons in fess sable, a base enarched rayonny gules, on a chief indented sable a sun Or.


The rayonny line of the base is too small to be identified from any distance. Complex lines should be drawn large and bold, the better to be seen. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 05/93

Percival Beaumont. Device. Per fess gules and sable, on a fess argent a flanged mace gules.


This conflicts with the flags of Syria (Per fess gules and sable, on a fess argent two mullets vert), of Iraq (Per fess gules and sable, on a fess argent three mullets vert), of Yemen (Per fess gules and sable, on a fess argent a mullet vert), and of Egypt (Per fess gules and sable, on a fess argent an eagle Or). In each case there is a single CD for the changes to the tertiary charges.


Against the arms of Blufield (Papworth 708), Per fess gules and sable, a fess argent indented on the under part argent, there is an obvious CD for adding the tertiary charge. Prior Laurel rulings (Nov 90, p.15) have granted no CDs for changes to the lower line only of an ordinary. I'm not certain those rulings are reasonable. Surely, if we grant a CD between, say, a fess and a fess embattled (embattled in chief by definition), then we should grant a CD between a fess and a fess embatted in base; the amount of change is exactly the same. I don't need to decide this point today, thanks to the other conflicts cited here; but commenters should be prepared to debate the pros and cons of the issue, when it arises again. 07/92

Petruccio Alfonso Maria Cuccieri de Cataluña. Badge. Azure, three annulets interlaced one and two argent, overall a Latin cross flory Or veiled purpure.


The badge suffers from a number of problems. The most serious is the lack of contrast between the purple veil and the azure field: not only is the veil itself unidentifiable, it obscures the underlying cross as well. This is the same problem for which the gentle's device submission was returned Sept 91, and it's equally reason for return here.


Moreover, the annulets are drawn too skinny for ready recognition at a distance. Finally, several commenters wondered whether the combination of the cross, purple Lenten veil, and Trinity symbol constituted excessive religious symbolism. Such excessive symbolism is disallowed under Rule IX.2. This submission has less symbolism than the example of excessive symbolism given in Rule IX.2, but more than an obviously acceptable example (e.g. a single cross). I don't know whether it should be considered excessive, but the submitter should be prepared to argue his case, should he resubmit with this motif. 01/93

Phoebe Mechtildis Ó Tighearnaigh. Name and device. Azure, three swallows volant Or within a bordure Or semy of roses gules.


The name has several improbabilities. The most notable is the use of the masculine-style Irish patronymic with the feminine given names. The combination of English, Old German, and Irish brings this even further beyond period style. A late period form (e.g. Phoebe Matilda O'Tierney) might be acceptable. As the submitter forbade any changes to her name, we were forced to return it; since she disallowed the use of a holding name, the device must be returned as well. 01/93

Pont y Saeth, Canton of. Badge. Argent, a bridge of one span embattled sable within an orle of arrowheads, points to center gules.


Like the device, this conflicts with the arms of Campbell of Hallyards (Lyon Ordinary I), Argent, a castle triple-towered sable; and of Castelpers (Rietstap), Argent, a castle sable. There is a CD for the addition of the charges in base, but we have granted no difference in the past between a bridge and a castle, considering both to be stonework surmounted by towers.


Should they resubmit with this motif, please persuade them to use honest heraldic arrowheads (pheons or broadarrows), as in their device. 7/93

Pont y Saeth, Canton of. Device. Argent, in chief a bridge of one span sable masoned Or, in base six pheons in annulo, points to center gules within a laurel wreath vert.


This must be returned for two reasons. First, the design consists of a single group of charges, all about equally dominant, of three different types. This is disallowed, per Rule VIII.1.a.


Second, this conflicts with the arms of Campbell of Hallyards (Lyon Ordinary I), Argent, a castle triple-towered sable; and of Castelpers (Rietstap), Argent, a castle sable. There is a CD for the addition of the charges in base, but we have granted no difference in the past between a bridge and a castle, considering both to be stonework surmounted by towers. 7/93

Ponte Alto, Barony of. Badge. (fieldless) A garter sable.


Conflict with the badge of Jonathon Blackshaft (SCA): (fieldless) A garter sable inscribed with "N A G S" Or. A comparison of the emblazons showed that the lettering on Jonathon's garter is as heraldically insignificant as the castle-shaped aiglet on Ponte Alto's garter. There is a single CD, for fieldlessness. 11/92

Porsche Audi. Name.


There are three problems with the name, each sufficient for return. First, Porsche appears to be a surname, not a given name. If I may trust my flawed German, the citation in Bahlow's Deutsches Namenlexicon defines Borsche/Porsche as "derived from a pet form (Koseform) of the Slavic Borislaw." It's derived from a given name, not necessarily a given name itself; and this is supported by Bahlow's examples (pp.70, 390), which show only surname usage. The submitter needs a given name.


Second, this infringes on the Porsche-Audi division of Volkswagen of America, a registered corporation. Laurel took the most direct method of discovering this: he visited a local Porsche-Audi dealership. The conjunction of the names is distinctive and famous enough to warrant protection.


Which leads us to the third problem, intrusive modernity. Arguably, both the above problems could be solved by substituting Portia for Porsche, but the problem of modernity would remain. Lord Crescent is correct when he states that there is no Rule explicitly banning intrusively modern names. Nonetheless, intrusive modernity is given as a reason for armorial return (VIII.4.b); it is given as a reason for not accepting mundane names, even under the Mundane Name Allowance (II.4); we may reasonably infer that intrusive modernity is unacceptable.


If a specific Rule must be cited, Rule I.1 requires all names to be "compatible with the period and domain of the Society"; moreover, even names formed from period elements can be returned if "they have been specifically declared incompatible by these rules, Laurel precedent, or a policy statement from the Board of Directors." Intrusive modernity has been declared sufficient reason for return in the past: Joe Westermark, the Artemisian Tank Corps, Rolling Thunder, and the Societas Historum Mortum have all been returned for modernity. The precedent is well-established, and therefore, by I.1 may be cited as reason for return.


The fact that this is a "joke name" is not, in and of itself, a problem. The College has registered a number of names, perfectly period in formation, that embodied humor: Drew Steele, Miles Long, and John of Somme Whyre spring to mind as examples. They may elicit chuckles (or groans) from the listener, but no more. Intrusively modern names grab the listener by the scruff of the neck and haul him, will he or nill he, back into the 20th Century. A name that, by its very presence, destroys any medieval ambience is not a name we should register.


For now, the submitter's armory has been registered under a holding name. We can only hope that, with time, she will tire of the humor and choose a name that's medieval in feel, as in construction. 08/92

Rabenstein, Shire of. Device. Argent, a chevron and in base a raven, overall a laurel wreath sable.


The sable laurel wreath, overlying the sable chevron, is rendered unidentifiable. Indeed, from any distance, the entire device becomes a large black blob; the three conjoined sable charges lose all identity. This needs to be redesigned; changing some tinctures, or making the laurel wreath not overall, might do the trick. 10/92

Radulfr Arnason. Device. Per bend sinister bevilled Or and sable, a mullet of ten points sable and an decrescent argent.


See the cover letter for a full discussion of Party bevilled. Neither the period discussions of Per bend bevilled nor an extrapolation from a bend bevilled would support the emblazon shown here; nor can it be accurately blazoned without resorting to barbarisms such as Per bend sinister bevilled fesswise. I'd be willing to accept Per bend (sinister) bevilled, as being one logical step from period evidence -- if drawn in a correct manner, with the middle "zag" palewise. The form shown here is two steps removed from the evidence, which is correspondingly harder to swallow. Given evidence that such bevilled fields were never used with charges, the whole becomes unacceptable. 08/92

Raffe Scholemaystre. Name.

Master is a reserved title in the SCA, and may not be registered as part of a Society name. The policy was most recently reaffirmed Oct 92, in the submission of Sara Annchen Baumeister.

The device was registered under the holding name James of Eoforwic. 12/92

Ragnar Hermanssohn. Device. Gules, an eagle's head erased within a bordure invected Or.


This conflicts with Albrecht von der Staffel (SCA): Gules, in pale an eagle's head couped and a compass star Or. There is a CD for changing the type of one of the charges on the field, per Rule X.4.e. 10/92

Ragnar of Moonschadowe. Device. Argent, a chevron rompu sable between three grenades proper.


This conflicts with Ball (Papworth 418), as cited in the LOI: Argent, a chevron sable between three fireballs of the last fired proper. There's a CD for making the chevron rompu, but not another for type of secondary charge. 09/92

Ragnar the Wolf. Device. Per chevron azure and argent, two wolves rampant contourny argent and an eagle displayed and sinister facing sable.


The tincture of the wolves was omitted from the blazon in the LOI. Normally, that would cause the submission to be pended, but Lord Leveret found a conflict, making it moot.


This conflicts with Seadna Adare (SCA) Per chevron azure and argent, two wolves combattant argent, and an oak tree proper. There's a CD for the cumulative changes to the charge in base (LoAR cover letter of 6 Sept 90). However, changes to any but the bottommost of three charges 2&1 don't garner a CD (v. LoAR of Oct 90, p.17), so reversing one of the wolves does not bring this clear. 10/92

Ragnarr Hardraada. Device resubmission. Gules, a bend sinister bevilled Or, overall a raven volant sable.


Though blazoned on the LOI as "on" the bend, the raven is actually overall. Therefore, per Rule VIII.2.b.i, it must have good contrast with the field. This was pointed out in the gentle's previous return, on the LoAR of Dec 86.


If he intends to keep a bend sinister bevilled in his resubmission, please instruct him on its correct depiction. See the cover letter for more details on bends bevilled. 08/92

Ram's Haven, Barony of. Name and device. Per fess embattled gules and argent, two demi-rams respectant argent and a laurel wreath vert.


We have received no petition, or other evidence of popular support, either for the name or the device. This is being returned without consideration of the submission's merits. 04/93

Randal the Redowtable. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a salmon haurient sustaining in its mouth a sword inverted and pendant from its tail a tankard, a bordure argent charged with crosses formy per pale gules and sable.


The device has several problems. It's right on the edge of acceptable complexity, per the guideline of Rule VIII.1.a, with five types of charge in three tinctures. The party-tinctured charges on the bordure add to the complexity, being difficult to identify. The further weirdness of having a limbless creature maintaining, not one, but two different charges brings this beyond the limit of acceptability. This must be returned for simplification. 06/93

Randal the Redowtable. Badge. (fieldless) A cross formy quarterly gules and sable surmounted by a salmon haurient argent.


As drawn, the salmon barely overlaps the cross, which is poor heraldic style, and has been reason for return since 17 June 83. If correctly drawn, with the salmon significantly overlapping the edges of the cross, this would violate our ban on overall charges in fieldless badges. Either way, it must be returned. We suggest resubmitting with the salmon entirely upon the cross, as a tertiary charge. 06/93

Randulf von Gelnhausen. Device. Argent, a castle gules, in chief three barrulets wavy azure surmounted by two escallops gules.


The charges in chief were blazoned in the LOI as on a chief [wavy] barry wavy argent and azure, two escallops gules. However, the use of the field as one of the tinctures of the chief renders this as barrulets in chief rather than a chief barry. That this was the submitter's intent is shown by the emblazon, which had the escallops overlying the edge of the "chief". (The surgery on the full-sized emblazon didn't quite remove the overlapping.) The correct blazon is with a primary castle, and a single group of charges in chief; and therefore, this conflicts with the arms of Castellani (Rietstap), Argent, a castle gules. 09/92

Raoul de Chenonceaux. Device. Or, on a chevron azure three fleurs-de-lys Or, in base a pegasus salient, a bordure gules.


The use of multiple gold fleurs-de-lys on blue is not permitted in SCA armory: it is too strongly suggestive of a claim of connection to French royalty. This ban covers both blue fields and blue charges, and has been in force for many years: "This color-semy combination may not be used in the SCA." [WvS, 15 March 82] "A bordure of France (ancient or modern) may not be used in SCA heraldry." [BoE, 20 Oct 85]


The prohibition is supported by period practice. Examples of armory using blue charges with gold fleurs include de St.Remi de Valois, Bastard of France, c.1520 (Argent, on a fess azure three fleurs-de-lys Or); John, Earl of Cornwall, brother to the claimant of the French throne, d.1336 (Gules, three leopards in pale Or, a bordure azure semy-de-lys Or); Medici, Dukes of Urbino, who bore an augmentation from the French crown c.1500 (Or, in annulo six roundels gules, the one in chief azure, charged with three fleurs-de-lys Or); Matthieu, Grand Bastard of Bourbon, d.1505 (Argent, on a bend azure semy-de-lys Or, a bendlet gules); and Jean de Rochefort, another Bastard of Bourbon, d.1444 (Argent, on a canton azure semy-de-lys Or, a bendlet gules). All claimed connection to French royalty, either by an augmentation therefrom or through blood; all bore a blue charge with gold fleurs-de-lys -- usually blazoned a [charge] of France.


It's not unreasonable to assume that a chevron of France makes a similar claim. The chevron was used this way for other dynastic houses: Philippe de Someldyck, bastard son of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, c.1500, bore Or, a chevron of Burgundy.


The period examples are so numerous that I feel I must uphold the Society's ban on gold fleurs-de-lys on blue backgrounds -- and make it explicit. Neither France Ancient (Azure semy-de-lys Or) nor France Modern (Azure, three fleurs-de-lys Or) may be used in SCA heraldry, either as the field (or part thereof) or on a charge. To do so constitutes a claim to connection to French royalty, prohibited under Rule XI.1. 07/92

Raudulfr a Pelanari. Name.


The byname was intended to mean "pint lingerer" in Icelandic; but no documentation was supplied to support that claim. The particle a doesn't seem to be correct Icelandic; and while peli does mean "(quarter- or half-) pint", we couldn't find -nari or its root verb nara. The closest any commenter could come was Pelari, using -ari as an agent suffix (cognate to -arius in Latin); that would not give the submitter's desired meaning.


This is being returned for documentation of the name elements, and some evidence that the construction follows period Icelandic practice. 10/92

Raven Gar. Badge. Or, a sinister wing ending in a hand sustaining a spear issuant from base sable.


This conflicts with Hallweil (Papworth 1123): Or, a pair of wings elevated and conjoined sable; and with Derneford (Papworth 1123): Or, two wings conjoined sable. The spear is a significant charge, equal in visual weight to the wing; there is a single CD for changing it to a second wing. 7/93

Raven Helmsplitter. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a Mongol helm and on a chief Or, three ravens sable.


We were given no evidence to support this form of helm as a "Mongol helm", or indeed as any nationality of helm. Such examples of Mongol helms as we could uncover did not show the submitted helm's fur trim or the hanging drapery; our best contemporary example (from an illustrated history of the Mongols by Rashid ad-Din, c.1300) showed a plain pointed cap with "ear muffs" on either side. Since this submission would be the SCA's defining instance of a Mongol helm, it's important that it be documented in this form. This is being returned, pending such documentation. 12/92

Rayne Moyra O'Ciaragain. Name.


Name returned. The surname is not grammatically correct, combining the Anglicized particle O' with an Irish Gaelic spelling of Ciaragáin; the name should be either fully Irish Gaelic or Anglized. Given the Anglicized rendering of the first two components of the name, Rayne and Moyra, the submitter would be well advised to use an Anglicized surname; in period O Kierregain or O Kerigane (Woulfe, p. 462) or the modern spelling O'Kerrigan (MacLysaght, p. 178). 9/93

Rayner le Falcon. Household badge; to be held jointly with Christiana Leigh. Or, a hammer inverted issuant from chief sable.


Conflicts with Olaf Brunharet Magnusson (SCA): Or, in pale a Thor's hammer sable and an ape passant proper. There is a single CD, for the removal of the ape. Since a Thor's hammer is inverted by definition, we get no difference for posture of the hammer -- and issuance from chief is worth no difference in this case. 03/93

Reannag Fhara, College of. Badge. (fieldless) A demi-eagle argent issuing from a compass star Or.


As noted in the LOI, this is actually a stylized phoenix. It therefore conflicts with the Mon of Seki (Hawley 50): Dark, a phoenix light. Even under our new policy on Mon, there is only one CD, for tincturelessness. 08/92

Rebecca des Trois Tours. Device. Vert, a cinquefoil and on a chief wavy argent, three towers sable.


The wavy line is indistinguishable as drawn; indeed, from any distance it's impossible to tell there is a wavy line. This must be returned for redrawing. 11/92

Rebecca Elizabeth the Reluctant. Name.


The earliest citation of the word reluctant is in 1662, past the Society's cut-off date of 1600, past even our 50-year "grey zone" for documentation. We cannot register it without some evidence of period use. We'd have deleted it, except the submitter permitted only minor changes to her name. 10/92

Red Spears, Barony of. Badge. (fieldless) A frauenadler displayed gules.


This conflicts with the arms of Boudrac: D'or à une harpie de gueules (Or, a harpy gules) (Rietstap). The illustration in the glossary section of Rietstap shows that he considered the harpy/frauenadler to be displayed by default; there is thus a single CD, for fieldlessness.


Note: the fact that these were considered distinct charges in period allows us to grant a CD against eagles. This is therefore clear of such armories as Blundell: Argent, an eagle displayed gules (Papworth). There is a CD for the fieldlessness and another for the difference between the primary charges. 9/93

Regenwulf Osbern of Nympsfield. Device. Per pale sable and purpure, a sea-wolf maintaining a sword argent.


This conflicts with the badge of HMSubmarine Seawolf, cited by Master Hrolf Herjolfssen via Lord Hund: Azure, a sea-wolf argent. (The badges of British ships are registered with the English College of Arms, so this is "real" armory, deserving protection under our current standards.) There's a CD for field, but nothing for the maintained charge. 09/92

Reginald de Sheppey. Household name for House de Sheppey.


The household name was spelled Sheppy on the LOI, but Sheppey (to match the documentation and submitter's name) on the forms. Under either spelling, however, this conflicts with the Isle of Sheppey, in the mouth of the Thames. The place is cited in general references (e.g. the 1991 E.Brit., vol.10, p.726), so it's important enough to protect. 06/93

Revelwood, Shire of. Name.


The name conflicts with Revelwood, a locale in Steven Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Revelwood is a fairly major site in Covenant's Land, according to its entry in The Atlas of The Land by Karen Wynn Fonstad; by our Administrative Guidelines, it is therefore important enough to protect. 7/93

Rhea of Alexandria. Name.


Rhea is documented only as the names of two goddesses: the mother of Zeus, and the deified mother of Romulus and Remus. It was disallowed (LoAR of Nov 83) pending evidence of its period use by normal humans; such evidence remains to be presented. Without documenation, the name must once again be returned. 05/93

Rhiannon de la Medewe du Leu. Device. Sable, a wolf's head cabossed argent within a bordure dovetailed Or.


This conflicts with Fandral Silverfox (SCA): Sable, a fox's mask argent. There is only one CD for the addition of the bordure. 9/93

Rhiannon de Licorne of Carreg Cennen. Name.


The byname de Licorne, "of Unicorn", is as ungrammatical in French as in English. Either Licorne must be documented as a place, or else the definite article inserted. Far more problematic was the use of the Welsh horse goddess Rhiannon with "of Unicorn": "It is a long-standing policy that the name Rhiannon may not be coupled with horses or unicorns, in view of Rhiannon's function as a horse goddess." [AmCoE, 27 Sept 86] The submitter specifically forbade any deletions to her name; however, as she permitted a holding name, we've registered her armory under Bev of Settmour Swamp. 10/92

Rhiannon Saint Chamberlayne. Device. Argent, a phoenix gules within a bordure azure semy-de-lys Or.


The use of azure semy-de-lys Or has been prohibited in Society armory for many years; it is too strongly suggestive of a claim to a French royal connection. The prohibition was reaffirmed on the LoAR of July 92, p.23. The bordure azure semy-de-lys Or has been specifically disallowed: "A bordure of France (ancient or modern) may not be used in SCA heraldry." [LoAR of 20 Oct 85] 11/92

Rhonwen Gwynedd. Device. Argent, a mountain and on a chief rayonny gules, three stag's heads cabossed argent.


The rayonny line of division is drawn too small to be visible from any distance. In period, complex lines were drawn big and bold, the better to be seen. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 06/93

Rhys Stevynson. Device. Per chevron azure and Or, two compass stars Or and a chess rook sable.


This conflicts with Ingerith of Ryzka (LoAR of Sept 92): Per chevron ployé azure and Or, two compass stars Or and a double-bitted axe gules. There's a CD for the cumulative changes to the basemost of three charges 2&1, but no difference for the ployé line of the field.


It also conflicts with Elizabeth Idlewine (SCA): Per chevron azure and Or, two suns and a griffin segreant to sinister, all counterchanged. Again, the cumulative changes to the basemost charge is worth a CD. We grant no difference between a sun and a mullet of [many] points; I must agree with Lord Owen that, logically, we should therefore grant no difference between a sun and a compass star. 04/93

Richard Barbarossa. Device. Per bend sable and Or, a column counterchanged.


With the best will in the world, we couldn't identify the primary charge as a column; guesses at the Laurel meeting ranged from "barrel" to "Grecian urn". If the submitter redraws this as a true heraldic column (such as found in Woodward, plate XXXII), there should be no further stylistic problem. 09/92

Richard deLacy. Name.


The name was already registered to this gentle, on the LoAR of Oct 91. 10/93

Richard Foxcroft. Device. Per pale vairy argent and azure, and vairy azure and argent, on a chief sable a fox courant argent.


Counterchanging a vair field isn't an acceptable practice: there is no heraldic difference between vair and "vair counterchanged", and the result is as visually indistinct as, say, Per pale checky Or and gules, and checky gules and Or. In each case, except for a discontinuity in the center of the shield, from any distance it looks like a single field.


The device conflicts with Morden: Ermine, on a chief sable a talbot passant argent. (The device, found in Papworth, p.562, is blazoned with an annulet in the honour point for difference gules. Since the annulet is specifically blazoned as a brisure, the original arms of Morden must be as blazoned above.) There's a CD for the field, but no difference for talbot vs. fox -- certainly not when used as tertiary charges.


It also conflicts with Shana Taleh (SCA): Vair en pointe, on a chief sable a demi-sun Or issuant from the line of division beneath an arch of eight mullets argent. There's a CD for the changes to the tertiaries on the chief, but no difference for the variations to the vair field. 12/92

Richard Ó Gríobhtha. Device. Per pale vert and Or, a sword inverted, the quillons interlaced with an annulet, and a griffin segreant counterchanged, in chief three fountains.


By our rule of thumb on complexity, this is right on the edge, with four types of charge and four tinctures. Combined with its lack of cohesion, this becomes unacceptable style. 08/92

Richard of Silverdawn. Name change (from Richard of the Silverdawn).


Silverdawn does not appear to be a validly constructed placename, and should not be used as though it were. The Grandfather Clause does not apply to this case.


The submitter's forms stated that "Laurel ruled in the LoAR of April 1984 that 'Silverdawn' was an acceptable made-up place name." No such statement is found in the LoAR of 14 April 84, when the current name was registered; the name was simply approved, in its entirety. Of the Silverdawn might be considered an epithet, or (as Lord Obelisk suggests) refer to the name of a ship. Dropping the article, however, makes Silverdawn a placename -- but no evidence has been presented that such a placename is plausible. The Grandfather Clause permits the submitter to use of the Silverdawn, as currently registered; to change that name requires documentation of the new meaning's acceptability. He might consider submitting Richard Silverdawn. 09/92

Richard Sparhawke. Device. Sable, a hawk displayed and on a chief embattled Or, three crosses crosslet sable.


This conflicts with Alaric Hawkwood of Hawkwood Manor (SCA): Sable, a hawk displayed and on a chief embattled Or, three fir trees eradicated sable. There's a CD for type of tertiary charge, per Rule X.4.j.ii, but no more. 10/92

Richard Stewart. Device. Per bend azure and vert, in pale two trident heads, hafts conjoined Or.


The charge does not appear to be reproducible from the blazon, nor could we devise a blazon that accurately desribed the symbol (complete with "cross bar clechy"). 12/92

Richenza le Wydu. Device resubmission. Gules, a horse rampant Or, its neck pierced by an arrow sable.


The device has multiple conflicts. From mundane heraldry, it conflicts with Chevalerie (Woodward 237): Gules, a horse salient argent. There's a CD for the tincture of the horse, but none for posture or for the arrow. The arms of Chivalet (Woodward 10) are identical, and likewise a conflict; ditto the arms of the Kent County Council (Public Heraldry), Gules, a horse rampant argent. From Society heraldry, it conflicts with Constanzia Tattersall, registered May 92: Gules, a horse rampant Or maintaining between its forelegs a goblet between three lit candles argent. There's a CD for the secondary charges, but none for the "held" charge in Constanzia's armory or the arrow in Richenda's. 10/92

Rioghnach Ninian uerch Rhys. Device. Argent, on a bend indented sable between two wolf's heads erased gules, three crescents palewise argent.


The indentations on the bend are much too small; they would be invisible from any distance. Medieval indented lines were drawn boldly -- indeed, in period, indented was synonymous with fusilly, which gives a good idea of how boldly the line was drawn. This must be returned for redrawing. 11/92

Ríognhach MacLeod. Device. Per bend azure and argent, two dolphins naiant counterchanged.


This had been pended from the August meeting, so the College might discuss whether it conflicted with William Castellan (SCA): Per bend azure and argent, in sinister chief three dolphins naiant in pale, and in dexter base a fleur-de-lys, all counterchanged. The conflict call depends on the definition of "half a group of charges". I'd suggested in the LoAR that we might consider the line of division to divide the group into "halves", regardless of the numbers involved. The College in general disapproved of my proposal, saying it would encourage poor style; and after reading the arguments, I'm inclined to agree.


Unfortunately, that means this does conflict with William Castellan, as cited. Without a redefinition of "half a group", I cannot grant a CD for changing type of one of a group of four primary charges (from a fleur-de-lys to a dolphin). There's a CD for deleting two of the charges in sinister chief, but no more.


If the submitter wishes to appeal, she might try to either devise an argument under which the current Rules grant two unambiguous CDs for this device; or permission to conflict could be obtained; or a Rules change sought. For now, the return is, in a real sense, the conservative decision. If we return a submission in error, the error can fixed as described above. If we register a submission in error, we're stuck with it. 10/92

Rising Waters, Barony of. Award name for Award of the Swan's Courtesy.


This conflicts with the Legion of Courtesy, registered to the Kingdom of Caid; the designator is transparent, and per Rule V.2 the addition of the modifier isn't sufficient difference. 11/92

Robert ap Llywelyn Cynwyd Fawr. Device. Per chevron raguly argent and azure, three "equal-armed Celtic crosses" gules and a male griffin passant Or.


The charges in chief aren't really Celtic crosses: their arms don't extend far enough past the edges of the annulets. Nor are they Norse sun crosses, since there is no conjoining. We've seen similar crosses used in (modern) church motifs, but they do not appear to be period heraldic crosses. This must be returned for either documentation on the crosses, or redrawing. 01/93

Robert de Cleftlands. Device. Vert, a tree couped and in chief a mullet of four points Or.


Conflicts with Gardin (Rietstap): De sinople à un arbre arraché d'or (Vert, a tree eradicated Or). There's a single CD, for the charge in chief. 11/92

Robert du Mont. Device. Azure, three chevrons braced and in chief a crescent argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Roger Wyville (Foster 211): Azure, three chevronels interlaced argent. There is a single CD, for the charge in chief. 7/93

Robert MacCarthy of Dublin. Device. Argent, on a bend azure between a stag trippant and a war hammer bendwise gules, three equal-armed Celtic crosses palewise argent.


The device has numerous conflicts, all stemming from the fact that, for designs with dissimilar secondaries (as here), Rule X.4.j.ii does not grant a CD for type alone of the tertiaries. The closest conflict is the mundane arms of Causton (Papworth 234): Argent, on a bend azure three crosses crosslet fitchy of the first. There's a CD for adding the secondaries, but not for change of type of the tertiaries. 11/92

Robert MacGreigor. Name.


Conflicts with Robert MacGregor (b.1671), better known as Rob Roy. Since his name is found in general references (e.g. Webster's Biographic Dictionary, p.635), he is important enough to protect. The submitter's armory was registered under the holding name Robert of Dragon's Mark. 03/93

Robert of Bohemia. Device. Argent, a Scottish piper passant to sinister argent, garbed vert and or, in sinister chief three musical notes, two and one, azure all within a bordure compony vert and Or.


This runs afoul of the ban on overly pictorial design, Rule VIII.4.a: the musical notes hovering over the piper are a cartoon representation of music. Moreover, the argent piper has no contrast with the argent field. Finally, period bagpipes had at most two drones. This needs an extensive redesign. 10/92

Robert Stewart. Name change (from Robert the Ironwolf).


This conflicts with several famous Robert Stewarts, of which the most important are the Stewart kings of Scotland, specifically Robert II and Robert III. 10/93

Roberta Rhiannon McMorland. Device. Counter-ermine, on a pale argent an orchid sable.


There are two reasons for this return. First, the orchid is too generic a charge to be registered. In the case of Megan Maria Griffinstar (LoAR of Feb 91), it was ruled: "Orchids come in far too many different shapes for reproducibility of the emblazon from the blazon, or for the blazon to adequately describe the emblazon. (There was also some evidence that the type of orchid drawn here is a post-period variant.)" Both objections hold true here: the orchid is drawn as a Cattleya, the genus grown in hothouses and used in most corsages; but since the Cattleya genus was named after William Cattley, a 19th Century florist, there's no evidence that they were known in period. Without such evidence, they may not be registered.


Second, this conflicts with Giovanna Maria Hunyadi di Ghiberti (SCA): Lozengy azure and Or, on a pale argent a purple iris slipped and leaved proper. There's a CD for the field, but neither the type of flower nor its slipping and leaving are worth any heraldic difference; and the change in its tincture alone isn't worth a CD, per Rule X.4.j. 04/93

Roberta Rose of Illiton. Device. Purpure, three roses in bend and on a chief invected argent a thistle purpure.


Unfortunately, the thistle was drawn with leaves, but without stem, making it look like a bulbous mustache; with the best will in the world, this couldn't be identified as a thistle. This must be returned for redrawing. 11/92

Robin of Rhovanion. Badge. (fieldless) A she-wolf statant reguardant Or.


Conflicts with the arms of Burgoigne (Papworth 60), Azure, a talbot passant Or; of Chaffin (ibid), Gules, a talbot passant Or; and of Gavenor (ibid), Gules, a fox passant Or. In each case there's a CD for fieldlessness, but none for type of canine beast, none for passant vs. statant, and none for the posture of the head. 10/92

Robin Telfer. Device. Sable, three bendlets wavy between two gulls volant affronty argent.


The gulls were blazoned displayed on the LOI, but were drawn as volant affronty. This is an inherently unidentifiable posture, and so unsuitable for heraldry. The submitter might try putting the gulls in an honest displayed posture. 09/92

Robindra of the Isles. Badge. (fieldless) A sun in its glory barry argent and azure.


Conflicts with the Mon of Omura (Hawley 69): Dark, a sun light. There is a single CD, for tincturelessness; the barry division of Robindra's sun is part of its tincture, and per Rule X.4.d cannot be counted for difference against tinctureless armory. 11/92

Robledal, Shire of. Device. Per pale Or and azure, an oak leaf inverted and fructed within a laurel wreath counterchanged.


This had been pended from the Jan 93 meeting, to allow the submitters to forward a petition of populace support. No petition having been received, this must be returned. 06/93

Robyn Wildeorcynn. Name.


The byname seems to go beyond the normal practice of animal epithets. Such epithets claim the attributes of a particular animal; for instance, the surname Deere may derive from "[swift as a] deer". Wildeorcynn means literally that she is of the same species as a deer; it is not a metaphor. Without documentation that such literal animal epithets were used in period, this must be returned. 11/92

Rolan O'Cellaigh the Gentle. Name.


The submitter's own documentation gives Rolan as a surname; the closest given name is Rodhlann (or, in modern Irish, Rólann). The double-N changes the sound of the last vowel; it is not a trivial spelling variant. Likewise, the submitter's documentation gives the surname as Ó Ceallaigh, not O'Cellaigh; the construction O'[name], with an apostrophe, is used with anglicized forms. We would like to see some evidence that these variant forms are correct. As the submitter permitted no changes, the name had to be returned. 08/92

Roland de Mounteney. Device. Quarterly per fess indented purpure and Or, in dexter chief a Bengal tiger couchant to sinister Or marked sable.


This conflicts with Mairi Rhianna nam Beanntan (SCA): Per fess argent and vert, a catamount (Felis concolor) couchant sinister proper. The catamount proper is effectively Or, and the tiger's marking is worth no heraldic difference. There is a CD for the field; but making the field partly Or requires the Or cat to be moved, so there is no CD for the forced change of placement. 09/92

Roland Witt. Device. Per pale Or and sable, two sea-goats combatant counterchanged, on a point pointed azure a mullet pierced, the points moline Or.


The "mullet moline" is unorthodox, to put it mildly. Before we can accept this, we need some evidence of its period use -- at the very least, that the moline treatment could be applied to anything other than crosses (and of course millrinds). Pending such evidence, this must be returned. 12/92

Rolant von Reichenau. Device. Ermine, on a golpe five gingko leaves, stems crossed Or.


This technically violates the provisions of Rule XI.4, which forbids the use of multiple tertiaries on a roundel as being too close to an inescutcheon of pretense. 10/92

Ron of Sundragon. Badge. Sable, two arrows in saltire between in pale two eagles' heads erased and in fess two groups of three wolves' heads erased, each with two heads addorsed cojoined to one affronty Or.


As drawn, the arrows are not recognizable from any distance: the points and fletching are too small, and the shafts too narrow. Arrows in period armorial art were drawn with exaggerated barbs and feathers, the better to be identified. We've returned badly-drawn arrows in the past (v. the LoAR of July 92, p.18), per Rule VIII.3; these must likewise be returned.


Additionally, the arrangement of charges is not good heraldic style: the design is visually busy, and the conjoined wolves' heads are, at best, awkward to blazon (which is always symptomatic of poor design). These might have been reason enough for return; in combination with the unrecognizable arrows, there are more than sufficient grounds to return this for redesign. 8/93

Rorich Wendel. Name.


Withdrawn by the submitter. 9/93

Rorius Domhnall Kithwall. Badge. (fieldless) A tower bendy sinister Or and vert, crusilly couped counterchanged.


This had been pended from the August meeting: on the LOI, the tower's tinctures had been incorrectly blazoned, and the crusilly assumed to be artistic-license arrowslits. Lady Brachet has suggested that the submitter would prefer this to be returned for redrawing, rather than have the arrowslits blazoned as crosses couped. I therefore return the badge, noting that artistic details should not be drawn as though they were a tertiary charge group, worth heraldic difference. 10/92

Rosamond of Lancashire. Device. Per chevron gules and argent, two garden roses slipped and leaved Or and a maiden statant affronty argent, vested gules, crined sable.


Technicially, the argent human has insufficient contrast with the argent background. It could be argued that so little of the maiden's skin is on the field that it should be considered as we would maintained charges -- that the maiden is overwhelmingly gules. That may well be true, in this rendering. But a design that depends on artistic details (long flowing hair, style of dress) to achieve acceptable contrast is fatally flawed; heraldic designs should have inherently good contrast.


This would be acceptable if the maiden were entirely gules -- indeed, if the skin were proper I'd be willing to meet the submitter halfway -- but I can't permit argent on argent, when only artistic license makes the figure visible. This must be returned. 04/93

Rosario di Palermo. Badge. (fieldless) A caltrop per pale gules and argent.


As drawn here, this "caltrop" more strongly resembles a mullet of four points shortened from base. (The latter phrase, I suppose, is the opposite of elongated to base.) This therefore conflicts with the badge of Eleanor Leonard (SCA): (tinctureless) A mullet of four points distilling a gout. The deletion of the gout is worth no difference. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but per Rule X.4.d, against a tinctureless badge the second needed CD must come from a category that doesn't involve tincture. The per-pale division of the "caltrop" is counted as part of its tincture, per X.4.d. See the cover letter for a more detailed discussion of this issue. 09/92

Roselynd Ælfricsdottir. New device. Sable, a garden rose slipped and leaved bendwise between two estoiles Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Schwartz (Rietstap): De sable à une rose d'or (Sable, a rose Or). There is a CD for adding the estoiles, but not for heraldic rose vs. garden rose; and we have hitherto granted no difference for slipping and leaving.


Anent the proposed conflict with Masser (Papworth 868), Sable, a cinquefoil Or, I agree there's no CDs between cinquefoil and (heraldic) rose; and no CDs between (heraldic) rose and garden rose; and no CDs between garden rose and garden rose slipped and leaved. But as Lord Crux Australis notes, conflict isn't necessarily a transitive operation; "A conflicts with B" and "B conflicts with C" doesn't guarantee that, by logical concatenation, "A must conflict with C". Thank Deity I don't have to decide the issue just now..... 08/92

Rowena MacDonald. Device. Gules, in pale a bird migrant argent and a heart Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Chamberlayn (Papworth 300), Gules, an eagle displayed argent. There's a CD for the charge in base. There's no heraldic difference between displayed and migrant. That leaves only the possible difference between an eagle and a generic bird. After some thought, we decided we couldn't grant a CD between a generic bird and any specific type of bird.


Against the arms of Howell (Papworth 304), Gules, a falcon rising, wings expanded argent, we would grant a CD between migrant and rising, wings displayed [expanded]. That, with the CD for the heart, brings it clear. 06/93

Rowena MacLeod. Name.


Exact conflict with Rowena MacLeod, registered Feb 84. (They are different submitters.) 08/92

Ruben Klaus Winterhalter. Badge. (fieldless) A rainbow "proper" clouded sable, surmounted by an arrow inverted sable.


The heraldic rainbow proper has four stripes, vert, argent, Or and gules, in that order (on a light-colored field, which the sable arrow overall implies). The submitted rainbow isn't correctly tinctured for a heraldic rainbow; neither is it properly tinctured for a natural rainbow. And blazoning each of its stripes individually would only emphasize the non-heraldic nature of the submission. If he resubmits with an honest heraldic rainbow, there should be no stylistic problems. 10/92

Ryan von Gunter. Name change (from Ryan von Gunterburg).


No documentation was presented to support Gunter as a period German placename; the existence of a street named Gunter in 20th Century London cannot be considered persuasive. Without evidence, Gunter may not be used as a placename, by its use with von. The submitter forbade any corrections to his name. 09/92

Sabina Portinari. Device. Argent, on a pale gules between four roses barbed and seeded proper, a sword argent.


This conflicts with the Rossal School (Public Heraldry): Argent, on a pale between four roses gules, a mitre Or between two open books proper. There's a single CD, for the changes to the tertiary charges. 08/92

Sable River, Shire of. Name change (from Misty Mere, Shire of).


This conflicts with the Rivers Herald, who served the Woodville family (Earls Rivers) in the 15th Century. The title is on the list of heraldic titles from the 1987 Armorial, which Mistress Alisoun deemed to be protected. The addition of the adjective is insufficient difference, per Rule V.2. 7/93

Sabrina la Rose. Alternate persona name and badge for Pippin the Jester. Or, a jester dancing affronty proper, vested, brandishing a bauble, and juggling two balls gules.


Neither the alternate name nor the badge can be registered without an acceptable primary name; as Sabrina la Rose was returned, these must be returned as well.


Additionally, the badge is excessively pictorial in its emblazon, which is disallowed per Rule VIII.4.a; and the combination of dancing and juggling is beyond the scope of heraldic postures, disallowed per Rule VIII.4.c. If she wishes to use a jester, please have her put it in a more heraldic posture. 05/93

Sabrina la Rose. Name and device. Per pale argent and gules, two roses counterchanged, seeded Or, leaves and stems entwined and issuant from base vert, on a chief gules a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or.


Sabrina does not appear to have been a valid given name in period. Hanks & Hodges err in saying that Geoffrey of Monmouth used the name; he used the name Habren, claiming it was the name of the lady for whom the River Severn (Welsh Hafren) was named. Sabrina is evidently the name of the Celtic river goddess who dwelt in the Severn (Gruffudd 55). At any event, none of these names has been documented as being used by common period humans. The submitter might consider using Sabina, which Withycombe documents to the 12th Century. (Note that, when used as an epithet, la Rose requires a lower-case article.)


The device has multiple problems. The sun is not drawn in a standard heraldic form; it looks more like the "rising sun" on some Japanese WWII battle flags. Moreover, only this unorthodox rendition of the sun prevents the gules chief from losing contrast against the half-gules field; if the sun were correctly drawn, the contrast would be more obviously unacceptable. This must be returned for redrawing and redesign. 05/93

Sabrina MacPherson. Name.


Sabrina is not a period given name. It is not a variant of Sabina (which is a valid given name), as stated in the LOI, but is rather the Latin name for the river Severn, or possibly for the Celtic river goddess for whom the Severn was named. Either way, Sabrina has been repeatedly disallowed for SCA use, the most recent instance being on the May 93 LoAR (Sabrina la Rose). We suggest the client resubmit with the name Sabina.


The armory has been registered under the holding name Deborah of Gryphon's Lair. 10/93

Saint Gildas the Wise, College of. Device. Per pale gules and vert, a two-headed merman erect affronty, heads addorsed argent, maintaining in dexter hand a torch Or enflamed tenné and in sinister hand an open book, between in fess two laurel wreaths Or.


With the tenné flame, the device suffers from too little contrast and too much complexity (four types of charge, five tinctures). Even had the flame been proper, as blazoned on the LOI, the device might well have still been too complex visually. This must be returned for simplification. 01/93

Sakura Kita Maikeru. Device resubmission. Sable, a branch of cherry blossoms bendwise within a crescent bendwise sinister inverted conjoined in annulo to a triple-crested wave argent.


This same submission had been returned July 86 for complexity and lack of blazonability: "The design is busy, and difficult to to blazon in conventional heraldic terms. Please choose a simpler design." The submitter has appealed, documenting each of the elements from Dower's Elements of Japanese Design.


The appeal, unfortunately, misses the point. The use of these elements had not been in doubt. The reasons for the previous return -- complexity and lack of blazonability -- are still valid, and still grounds for return. Moreover, if the three conjoined charges are considered a single group of charges -- which, since they have equal visual weight, is not unreasonable -- then the current Rules provide a new reason for return, per VIII.1.a.


You should remind the submitter that simply documenting the charges from Japanese Mon is not necessarily sufficient. The way the charges are arranged must also be acceptable. As was pointed out to him in his first return (LoAR of 17 April 83): "All mon must be blazonable by European heraldic terminology or they cannot be registered. Japanese personas are visitors registering mon as arms with a European College of Arms." We suggest he simplify the design by deleting one of the charges, and rearranging the others in a more symmetrical fashion. 03/93

Sara Annchen Baumeister. Name and device. Azure, on a chevron Or masoned sable between two dividers and an A-frame plumb-line Or, a wooden carpenter's square in chevron proper.


Until such time as the Board of Directors releases the title Master for use by the populace, it must be considered a title of peerage in the Society; we will not register any name that claims to be a "Master [anything]". In the case of the Master Bowmen of the East (LoAR of July 90), it was ruled: "We cannot, in good conscience, register a title reserved by Corpora to peers to any non-peerage group, no matter in what form they propose to use it." The same argument applies to individuals.


We would normally, at this point, register the device under a holding name. However, the device was misblazoned in the LOI, making accurate conflict-checking impossible. The thought of pending a device so that it could be registered under a holding name seems circuitous -- particularly for a device at the very edge of acceptable complexity, as this one is. It seems better, all around, to give the submitter a chance to redesign both the name and device. 10/92

Sara Davies of Monmouth. Device. Vert, two Saracens maintaining shepherd's crooks proper, overall a natural fountain argent spouting water azure.


The submission suffers some severe design problems. The tinctures of the Saracens are, except for their faces, undefined; indeed, as rendered in the full-size emblazon, the vesting cannot be blazoned in heraldic tinctures. The use of proper Saracens, proper vesting, and proper crooks is excessive. The tinctures of the fountain had not been adequately defined in the LOI's blazon ("a fountain argent and azure"), making commentary difficult. Finally, though the fountain was blazoned as between the Saracens in the LOI, the full-sized emblazon shows the fountain slightly surmounting them -- in short, they are standing behind it, giving the design an appearance of depth contrary to the precepts of medieval heraldry. This must be returned for redesign. 8/93

Sarah Rumoltstochter. Badge. Per pale rayonny gules and azure, an egg fesswise Or.


This conflicts with the arms of Bassingford (Papworth 1046): Azure, a bezant. We see no heraldic difference between a roundel and an egg.


The egg was not drawn in a bold heraldic manner, to fill the available space. Had it been, the complex line of the two-color field would have been obscured, in violation of Rule VIII.3. Either way, this is unacceptable. 09/92

Sean Angus MacDuinnchinn. Badge. (fieldless) A kris inverted sable.


This conflicts with the badge of Thaddeus the Brown (SCA): Gyronny Or and vert, a dagger inverted sable. There's a single CD, for fieldlessness. 09/92

Sean O'Connor. Name.


This conflicts with John O'Connor, Archbishop of the Diocese of New York, who has gained national attention with his anti-abortion opinions. He is listed in general referernces (Encyclopedia Americana, 1992 ed., vol.20, p.628), so he's important enough to protect. (See also the LoAR of Nov 88, where another submission was returned for the same conflict.) 08/92

Seán Graethorne. Name change (from Seán Spíoine Glaise).


The spelling of grae- in the byname cannot be justified from period evidence: the one spelling of "grey" with an AE dipthong is the OE graeg (where the final G is actually a yogh). We might have accepted this as Graithorne, or with some standard spelling of the word, but the submitter forbade any changes to the name. 04/93

Sebastiana of Lost Forest. Device. Purpure, a female centaur passant reguardant contourny, maintaining in one hand a spear Or and in the other hand a garden rose gules, slipped and leaved vert, between three roses argent.


The design has multiple problems. On the full emblazon sheet, the centaur is drawn in trian aspect, which has been disallowed for many years. The design is on the very edge of acceptable complexity, with five tinctures and three types of charges -- assuming the garden rose and heraldic roses to be the same type of charge. By that assumption, the design mixes the medieval and modern renditions of the same charge, which is unacceptable style. (If the garden rose were considered a distinct charge from the heraldic rose, the design would then be too complex per Rule VIII.1.a.) The combination of anomalies is sufficient to warrant return. 05/93

Seeger of Ringhaven. Name.


Submission withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 9/93

Sela nic a'Phearsoin of Clan Chattan. Badge. (fieldless) On a castle sable a wheel argent.


This conflicts with Frederick of the West Tower (SCA): Argent, a tower sable, on its base a cross patonce voided argent. There's a CD for fieldlessness, but no difference between a castle and a tower, and no difference for the tertiary charge.


This was submitted as a badge for the alternate persona name Arianrhod ferch Branwen ferch Olwen, which was returned December 1992. There was some concern that, in combination with the name Arianrhod ("silver wheel"), a design with a silver wheel might be excessive. (There's also Caer Arianrhod, which Gruffudd cites as a Welsh name for the constellation Corona Borealis.) The submitter should probably be warned that excessive reference to mythical or magical characters may be grounds for return, all by itself. 01/93

Sela nic a'Phearsoin of Clan Chattan. Alternate name for Arianrhod ferch Branwen ferch Olwen.


Arianrhod is the name of the Welsh moon goddess, and has not been shown to have been used by humans in period. It has been returned ere now (LoAR of Aug 87, p.13); pending evidence of its period use, it must again be returned.


The client's name was registered May 92 in the form given above. Her paperwork suggests she thinks her name was registered in a different form. You might inform her of the correct form of her name, and invite her to submit a name change if she's dissatisfied with it. 12/92

Sentinels' Keep, Barony of. Name for the Order of the Vigilant Sword.


This conflicts with the Order of the Sword, a Swedish order founded 1522 (Franklyn & Tanner 322). Per Rule V.2, the addition of the adjective is insufficient difference. 03/93

Seonaid of Nairn. Household name for House Seanchaidhe.


The sennachie, or seanchaidhe, were more than simply historians; they studied and told the old tales and legends, and were the keepers of genealogy and tradition in Ireland and the Scottish highlands. The sennachie became a semi-hereditary class, similar to bards; and it's worth noting that the office of the High Sennachie was the precursor to the Lyon King of Arms. As such, seanchaidhe is a title and rank, not merely the Irish for "historian"; it may not be registered as a household name. 09/92

Shannon of the River. Name.


Shannon is not a period given name, but turns out to be the submitter's mundane given name (a fact which should have been in the LoI, but wasn't). It would therefore be registerable, if the rest of the name were acceptable. However, as Shannon is the name of both the river in Ireland and the goddess associated with that river, this is in conflict with that goddess, and must be returned for that reason. 10/93

Shattered Oak, Shire of. Name.


No petition of support from the populace was included with this submission. 06/93

Shu'la bint Shaqeeqa. Name.


The names are documented from Qazi's What's in a Muslim Name, which I regard with the same suspicion as any other baby-name book that cites neither dates nor sources. In this case, neither Shu'la nor Shaqeeqa are found in Lord Clarion's list of names from the period Fihrist of al-Nadim. Additionally, Qazi notes both Shu'la and Shaqeeqa as feminine names; as Lord Clarion notes, the use of matronymics in Arabic names is vanishingly rare. At the very least, we need more documentation before we can register this name. 05/93

Shúla bint Shaqeeqa. Device. Per fess vert and Or, two Paschal lambs passant reguardant argent and a ram rampant to sinister sable.


The device uses two artistic variants of the same charge, which isn't acceptable style. Almost-but-not-quite identical charges cause visual confusion, where the whole purpose of heraldry is visual recognition. We suggest substituting another charge for the ram. (The name was returned May 93 for lack of documentation.) 10/93

Sibeal O'hOgáin. Device resubmission. Vert, on a lozenge Or, a sprig of mistletoe inverted within a mascle vert.


This still conflicts with the flag of Brazil: Vert, on a lozenge Or a celestial sphere azure. The cumulative changes to the tertiary charges is worth a maximum of one CD.


The resubmission was blazoned on the LOI as Vert, on a lozenge within a mascle Or, a sprig of mistletoe [inverted] vert, fructed argent. However, the "mascle" was so slender as to be almost cotising -- which is only done with ordinaries. The equal widths of the mascle and its spacing from the lozenge made it difficult to recognize the mascle; the above reblazon is more probable under these conditions, and leads to the conflict with Brazil. If the client resubmits this in a way that distinguishes the mascle -- we suggest making it thicker and argent -- it should clear the conflict. 05/93

Sidonia of Seven Oaks. Badge. (fieldless) Two quill pens in saltire sable surmounted by a butterfly argent.


The overall charge renders the pens unidentifiable, in violation of Rule VIII.3. Indeed, this submission is a textbook example of why I suggested a ban on overall charges in fieldless badges, in my cover letter of 3 Aug 92: the pens, far from being identifiable as pens, instead look like extensions of the butterfly's wings. The visual effect would be blazoned A butterfly argent, wings tipped sable; and therefore, this conflicts with the badge of Anne of Caerdydd, reblazoned elsewhere on this LoAR: (fieldless) A butterfly argent, wings tipped gules. 01/93

Siegfried Rupert Stanislaus. Device. Per pale Or and gules, a castle counterchanged within a bordure paly bendy azure and argent.


The use of paly bendy azure and argent has been prohibited in Society armory since 1984; it is too strongly suggestive of a claim to a connection to the rulers of Bavaria. The prohibition was reaffirmed on the LoAR cover letter of 18 Sept 92, p.3. In this case, the problem is particularly acute: the bordure is drawn so wide that this might be blazoned more accurately as Bavaria with an inescutcheon per pale Or and gules, thereon a castle counterchanged. This makes the problem of presumption more obvious, but either way, the use of the Bavarian field is unacceptable. 11/92

Sieglinde Achtermann. Device. Azure, a dragon passant argent, a chief indented argent ermined azure.


This conflicts with Karina of the Far West (SCA), Azure, a wivern statant argent. There's a CD for the chief, but none for dragon vs. wyvern, nor for statant vs. passant. 10/93

Sigeferd Bjørnen. Device. Quarterly urdy azure and vert, a bear rampant Or between four towers argent.


The urdy line of division is drawn far too small, which would be reason for return even if the portions of the field had good contrast with one another. When the field is of two colors, the line of division is even more unidentifiable; when the line has a charge overall, more unidentifiable still. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 09/92c

Simon Rodbeorhting. Device. Per bend sinister argent and azure, a lotus blossom in profile and a moose statant contourny counterchanged.


Conflicts with the device of Alisande of Fenny Drayton (SCA): Per bend sinister argent and azure, an iris and a dove close to sinister counterchanged. There is a CD for type of primary charges, but because both armories contain a cup-shaped flower in dexter chief, we cannot grant Sufficient Difference of Charge per Rule X.2. 09/92

Simona Zon d'Asolo. Badge. (fieldless) A cubit arm proper issuant from the mouth of a fish's head couped close vert, sustaining a crescent gules.


Visually the three charges have equal weight, making this a single group of three different charges. This must be returned for violating Rule VIII.1.a. 09/92

Simona Zon d'Asolo. Device. Argent, a melusine proper, crined gules, tails supported by two arms issuant from the flanks proper, the melusine maintaining in her upraised hands two crescents, in base a crescent gules.


The arms have insufficient contrast on the argent field. Human flesh "proper" was sometimes emblazoned as argent in period tomes; and in any case, carnation (pink) cannot be seen against white. (Technically, a melusine proper is considered neutral, and acceptable on argent; in practice, its contrast with an argent field is borderline. But the arms definitely violate Rule VIII.2.b.i.)


The device is also too close to Ellis (Papworth 983): Argent, a mermaid proper. There's no difference granted for melusine vs. mermaid. There's a CD for adding the arms. The "held" crescents are worth no heraldic difference. That leaves the crescent in base, which is the same size as the held crescents; either it's worth the same amount of difference (i.e. none), or it's part of the group of secondary charges that includes the arms. Either way, its presence does not contribute the second CD needed to bring this clear. 09/92

Sine Guinne of Kilernan. Name.

As the LOI notes, the Society considers the use of a clan name (Guinne, Gunn) with the seat of the clan (Kilernan) to be presumptuous; the only examples we've found of such usage are by clan chiefs and their immediate families. We would have simply deleted the toponymic, but the submitter disallowed any changes to her name. 01/93

Siobhán le Blake. Device. Or, on a lozenge throughout gules a fret Or, a bordure azure.


The use of the throughout charge on the lozenge gives the appearance of an inescutcheon of pretense. This usage is disallowed, per Rule XI.4. 7/93

Siobhán NicDhuinnshléibhe. Device. Vert, an owl contourny perched atop a branch fesswise, between three drop spindles inverted argent threaded sable.


The thread of the drop-spindles takes up most of the charge, so these are effectively black-on-green, in violation of the Rule of Contrast. We also note that, as drawn, the owl is in trian aspect; when the device is resubmitted, please instruct the submitter to draw the bird correctly. 09/92

Siona Storm. Device. Gules, semy of lightning bolts voided sable, on a chief Or three clouds sable.


The LOI blazoned the lightning bolts as Or, but the full-sized emblazon showed them as sable outlines, with the field showing through -- no Or at all. Either the lack of contrast for sable/gules, or the complex voiding, would be reason enough for return; the two together certainly are.


Should she resubmit with this motif, please instruct her to draw fewer and larger lightning bolts -- say, about ten of them. 05/93

Sionan de Prendergast na Seanachai. Name.


The occupational byname uses incorrect grammar: the article na is the female genitive form, where it should be the masculine nominative form an. It should also prefix a T to nouns beginning with S + a vowel, so the correct form should be an tSeanachaidhe. However, as the submitter allowed no changes, we cannot fix the grammar; this must therefore be returned.


As to the question of presumption, I consider the Seanachai to be no more presumptuous than, say, the Bard. So long as the name isn't constructed to suggest a title (e.g. the Seanachaidhe of Kerry), the term should be acceptable for personal names. 04/93

Sionan Padraig Caimbeul. Device. Per pale gyronny sable and Or, and gyronny Or and sable, on a chief triangular argent a sheaf of three thistles gules, slipped and leaved vert.


The device does not appear to be correct medieval style. The use of the two gyronny divisions is visually confusing here, with the sinister division being the counterchange of the dexter division.


Moreover, the only examples we've seen of multiple gyronny divisions in one device involved marshalling. Were this considered a marshalled coat -- and the fact that the Campbell (Caimbeul) arms are Gyronny sable and Or suggests this was the submitter's intent -- it would be returnable on those grounds alone. It's true that a charged chief may, in most cases, remove the appearance of impalement; but simultaneously, the use of Campbell armory with the name Caimbeul reinforces that appearance. For either reason, this must be returned. 7/93

Sirideain ui Neill. Name.


Sirideain is the genitive form of the given name Siridean; it's how the latter would mutate when used in a patronymic, for instance. As a given name, the unmutated form should be used. Furthermore, the patronymic particle should be ua; ui, the submitted spelling, is the plural. The submitter forbade any changes; this must therefore be returned. 01/93

Sirideain ui Neill. Device. Checky Or and vert, a bull's head cabossed, a bordure sable.


The name was returned on the LoAR of Jan 93, and the submitter forbade the construction of a holding name. Without a name under which to register the device, it too must be returned. 8/93

Snorri Blódhdrekkr ór Ódhinslundi. Device. Per chevron throughout Or and sable, two oak leaves and a dragon tergiant in annulo, head to base counterchanged, on a chief purpure a comet Or.


The emblazon has multiple problems, which combine to make the device unacceptable. The comet is unidentifiable as drawn: it more closely resembles a sword blade attached to an asterisk. The dragon is in an unheraldic posture, awkward of blazon and not attested in period. The cumulative effect warrants return for redesign. 06/93

Somhairle Ó Laidhigh. Device. Purpure, a boar's head erased argent between two pairs of drinking horns in saltire, mouths to base, and a pig's hoofprint Or, a bordure embattled argent.


Returned for unidentifiability of the hoofprint as drawn (guesses included wings, hawk's bell, crescent, etc...) While we do, grudgingly, permit pawprints as charges, they must still be identifiable as drawn. We'd suggest resubmitting with another charge in base. 10/93

Sophia Fearadaigh. Alternate persona name for Sophia Sans Peur.


Without a primary name, we cannot register this alternate persona name. I don't believe holding names can be formed for anything but armory. 08/92

Sophia Fearadaigh. Name.

The submitter's documentation shows Ó Fearadaigh, with the patronymic particle. That particle mutates the following name; the unmutated form would be Feradach or Fearadhach. She could use Sophia Fearadhach, or the patronymic form Sophia ní Fhearadhaigh; but it's incorrect grammar to use the genitive of the given name alone, without the particle that casts it into the genitive. As she permitted no changes to her name, this must be returned. 08/92

Sorcha ni Mhurchadha. Device. Sable, on a fess embattled Or a winged unicornate lion salient gules.


Grafting unicorn's horns onto random animals is not period practice. It has been decried by previous Laurels (LoAR of 3 Aug 86, p.15), and always discouraged; I am taking the final step and, except for Grandfathered cases, disallowing it entirely. 10/92

Southkeep, Shire of. Badge. (fieldless) On a tower azure a crux stellata argent.


Conflicts with Der Dumer (Manesse #101): Argent, a bell tower azure roofed gules containing a bell argent. The bell is essentially a tertiary charge on the tower; as the latter isn't a simple geometric charge, Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply here. The change of type of tertiary is not worth a CD; the only countable difference is for fieldlessness.


Possible infringement was cited against the flag of the Eureka Stockade rebellion: Azure, a crux stellata argent. While I sympathize with the concerns of our Lochac colleagues, I don't see that this badge can reasonably be construed as infringement. See the discussion on Southkeep's badge for its Brewers & Vinters Guild (under PENDED) for a complete discussion. 12/92

Southkeep, Shire of. Badge resubmission for the Southkeep Brewers and Vinters Guild. (fieldless) On an amphora azure, a crux stellata argent.


Graciously withdrawn by the submitter. 08/92

Stanislaw Jan Ossolinski. Badge appeal. (fieldless) A cross "formy convexed" argent, charged in each arm with a crescent sable.


This badge had been returned on the LoAR of May 92 for lack of documentation on the type of cross. (It had been blazoned in the previous submission as a cross formy globate, which term we couldn't find in any of our references.) The submitter has appealed that return, providing evidence of this cross as an artistic motif on a suit of armor c.1630. The term "convexed", referring to the bulge of the outer edges of the cross's limbs, is documented in Elvin's Dictionary of Heraldry.


Unfortunately, my main concerns about this cross remain unaddressed. It's not readily blazonable: as drawn, it resembles a roundel with four semi-elliptical notches, not a variant of a cross formy. It's been documented only to within our 50-year "grey area", and only as an artistic motif, not an heraldic charge. The only terms that adequately describe it are found in a 19th Century work, compiled by an author whose lack of scholarship is legend. I simply have no grounds for believing this cross to be compatible with period heraldic style.


This cross has been submitted before, and returned for the above reasons; v. Jamys Ellyn Rothesay of Bannatyne Hall, LoAR of Sept 92, p.49. I'm tempted, I admit, to simply give the cross its own SCA name. (In the immortal words of Baldwin of Erebor, "Spring is in the air, and the fit is upon me; let me name but one cross before I die!") But this would do no service to the heralds and scribes who will follow us; we need some assurance that any blazon we devised would be reconstructable. In this case, at the very least we'd need to find this cross mentioned by name in some accessible reference. Failing that, or better evidence that it's a period motif, I must continue to return it. 03/93

Stanwulf the Stern. Device resubmission. Gules, a snowy owl affronty and a bordure argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Albany (Papworth 314): Gules, an eagle displayed and a bordure argent. There's a CD for the change in the bird's posture, but nothing for its type: eagles and owls are both raptors, and the main heraldic difference -- the head posture -- is specifically worth no difference under the Rules (as well as having been subsumed into the rest of the posture change).


Even when affronty, "owls got feet". Should the client resubmit with a similar motif, please instruct him to draw the owl correctly. 8/93

Stanwulf the Stern. Device. Gules, an owl affronty argent.


This conflicts with the devices of Steffan ap Cenydd of Silverwing (SCA), Azure chapé ployé invected, an owl close affronty argent, and of James MacChluarain (SCA), Sable, an owl argent; as well as the badge of Adelicia Gilwell (SCA), Gules, an owl Or. In the first case, there is a CD for the field, but certainly not for posture of the owl. In the second and third cases, there is likewise a CD for tincture (of the field or the owl); but the owl's posture has slightly changed, from statant close guardant to statant close affronty (which is guardant by definition). The "blobbiness" of the owl's body, and the fact that the owl is guardant in all cases, leads me to conclude that there is no visual difference for turning the owl's body affronty. 08/92

Stargate, Barony of. Badge. Argent, on a pile sable, a mullet of three greater and six lesser points argent, and on the line of division two towers counterchanged.


This is the Baronial arms with the laurel wreath removed. While it's true that the unusual mullet, and the towers overlying the pile's edge, are permitted to Stargate under the Grandfather Clause, there are still possible conflicts due to the wreath's removal. Specifically, this conflicts with Traidenis Vilkas of Winter Oak (SCA): Argent, on a pile sable a wolf's head cabossed argent. There's a CD for adding the overall charges, but Rule X.4.j.ii doesn't apply when overall charges are present; so change of tertiary type is not enough for a second CD. 09/92

Stephen Wolfe. Badge. (fieldless) On a delf sable, a wolf's head erased argent.


Fieldless badges consisting only of forms of armorial display, such as escutcheons, lozenges and delfs, are not acceptable since in use the "shield" shape does not appear to be a charge, but rather the field itself. This presents an entirely different armory for view. Further, when considered this way, this submission conflicts with the badge of William of Houghton: Sable, a grey wolf's head erased proper (SCA). 9/93

Stephen Wolfe. Badge. Per bend indented gules and sable, a wolf's head erased argent within an orle of chain Or.


This must be returned, for either of two reasons. First, the field has a complex line of division using two colors, with the wolf's head obscuring the line. This is unacceptable, per Rule VIII.3.


Second, no archive copy of the badge was included. Even had it been otherwise acceptable, the badge would still have been returned. 06/93

Stevyn Gaoler. Device change. Gules, a ferret sejant erect within a bordure embattled argent.


This conflicts with Iain Dughall Cameron, registered Nov 91: Gules, an otter couchant to sinsister guardant within a bordure embattled argent. There's a CD for the posture of the beast, but nothing for its type. 09/92

Storvik, Barony of. Badge. Paly argent and gules, a wooden drakkar's prow proper.


The brown drakkar's prow has insufficient contrast on this field. Partially, this is due to the similarity in tinctures: none of the heraldic colors is as close to brown as gules. Partially, it's due to the elongated vertical charge on the vertically striped field. The combination renders the prow unidentifiable. The submitters might consider using a standard heraldic tincture for the prow. 05/93

Styphan ap Owain. Name.


This infringes on the name of Morgan ap Styphan ap Owain, registered earlier on this LoAR. Rule V.5 forbids any name that claims a close relationship to a specific individual; this name claims such a relationship (as Morgan's father). The fact that the submitter undoubtedly is Morgan's father does not permit him to make the claim without permission -- any more than Paul of Bellatrix's son could register his arms, even differenced, without permission. We need a letter of permission from Morgan before we can register this name. 09/92

Styvyn Longshanks. Device change (appeal). Gules, a comet bendwise sinister, head to chief, argent.


This had been returned on the LoAR of May 92 for conflict with the arms of Honsard (Papworth 695): Gules, an eight-pointed estoile argent. The submitter has appealed this decision, arguing that (a) estoiles and comets are separate charges, so Rule X.2 should apply here; and that (b) even if X.2 doesn't apply, there should be a CD for type of charge and a CD for placement on the field. (Honsard's estoile is centered on the shield, while the submitter's comet has its head in sinister chief.)


On the first point, I find no evidence that an estoile and a comet are so distinct charges as to permit Rule X.2, the Sufficient Difference Rule, to apply between them. All my sources define the comet as a modified estoile: an estoile with a flaming tail appended. (Parker 130; Woodward 310; Franklyn & Tanner 82) Indeed, Lord Crescent notes examples from Papworth suggesting that the change from estoile to comet is a single cadency step: e.g. Waldock (Or, an estoile flaming [i.e. a comet] sable) and Waldeck (Or, an eight-pointed estoile sable). I am willing to grant a CD between the two charges, but I cannot see granting Sufficient Difference between them.


On the second point, the submitter overlooks the fact that, if we elongate the charge, parts of it must be displaced; that's included in the definition of elongation. One cannot count one CD for the first change, and another CD for the second: the second follows automatically from the first. It's analogous to the change between, say, a compass star and a compass star elongated to base, or a Greek cross and a Latin cross. So long as both charges are drawn to fill the available space, the change in type (from symmetrical to elongated) cannot also be counted as a change in placement.


This must again be returned, for conflict with the arms of Honsard. The submitter might consider using a divided field. 01/93

Suleyman Khayam. Badge. (fieldless) An anchor sable surmounted by two kris knives inverted in saltire argent hilted sable.


The anchor was depicted as a folding-stock fisherman's anchor, a modern type. He should consider using a period depiction of an anchor (such as found in Neubecker, p.15). 08/92

Susanna Elizabeth Marie Wiegner von Kassel. Name.


With five name elements in three languages, we require some documentation that this is acceptable period style. Presumably (because of the locative) the primary language is German, so any resubmission should address period German naming style: are there period examples of German names with five elements? Without such examples, I must rule as I did for English names (LoAR of July 92) and Italian names (Sept 92), and disallow German names of five or more elements. 10/92

Suzanne Grey of York. Device. Purpure, on a mullet of eight points argent, a water lily in profile sable.


This conflicts with Anthony the Sinister (SCA): (fieldless) On a mullet of ten points argent, a pheon sable. There is no difference between multi-pointed mullets; and as a mullet isn't a simple charge, changing the type of tertiary doesn't merit a CD per Rule X.4.j.ii. 10/92

Sveyn Egilsson. Badge. (fieldless) A swan displayed per pale azure and argent maintaining in dexter foot the hilt and in sinister foot the blade of a broken sword Or.


Conflicts with the Mon of Mori (Hawley 48): Dark, a crane displayed light. There's a CD for tincturelessness, of both field and charges. Mori's crane, like most cranes in Japanese armory, is shown without the long legs that are so characteristic of its depiction in European armory. Without those legs, there's virtually no visible distinction between a crane and a swan in the same posture. The "held" charges count for no difference. 01/93

Swampkeep, Canton of. Device. Or, a dragon rampant vert within a laurel wreath gules, on a chief wavy vert goutty d'eau a tower Or.


The design is overly complex. It uses five types of charge in four tinctures, which exceeds the standard of complexity outlined in Rule VIII.1.a. This must be returned for simplification.


Moreover, we received no petition of support from the populace for this design. Without such a petition, a device cannot be registered. 05/93

Sylvia Schirenhoferin. Device. Vert, a winch and a chief doubly enarched Or.


The winch is drawn in trian aspect, which is not period heraldic style. Additionally, since this seems to be the defining instance of a winch in SCA armory, we need some documentation of this form as a period charge or artifact. ["Just a winch at heart", indeed!] 09/92

Sylvia Stjarnstirrare. Device. Azure, a chevron between two mullets and a spiral hunting horn reversed argent.


Device returned for multiple conflicts, of which the following are typical: Arnott (Papworth 459), Azure, a chevron between three mullets argent; Allenson (Papworth 373), Azure, a chevron argent; Gardner (Papworth 452), Azure, a chevron between three bugle horns argent; M'Beath (Papworth 458), Azure, a chevron between in chief two mullets and in base a crescent argent; Angela of the Stoney Oak Forest (SCA), Azure, a chevron between two acorns and an oak leaf argent; and Beorn Collenferth (SCA), Azure, a chevron between a harp, an axe reversed and a sabertooth tiger statant argent. In each case, the change to, or addition of, secondary charges is worth a single CD. 10/93

Taichleach Selwyn. Household name for The Caravan.


The household name runs afoul of Rule III.1, which requires all names to have at least two name elements; group names must have a designator and "at least one descriptive element" (III.1.b). To put it another way, the name is too generic to be reserved to a single group. Just as we would decline to register The Household or The Group -- or, just as we declined to register The Buttery (Marion of Edwinstowe, LoAR of April 89) -- so must we return this name. If they add a descriptive element (and assuming no conflicts), it should be acceptable. 03/93

Takeo Niro. Badge. Sable, three hexagons voided and conjoined one and two, within each three tomoe in annulo argent.


As noted with the submitter's device, tomoe cannot be blazoned in European terms. Armory with tomoe is therefore not compatible with European heraldry, upon which the Society bases its own. 11/92

Takeo Niro. Device. Argent, three hexagons voided and conjoined one and two, within each three tomoe in annulo sable.


Tomoe are comma-shaped figures, used in Japanese Mon to represent a whirlpool. Mon designs may have one, two, or (most usually) three tomoe in annulo. They have no equivalent in European armory. (Hawley & Chappelear, Mon: the Japanese Family Crest, p.76)


In general, Mon-like designs are acceptable in Society armory only if they can be blazoned in European heraldic terms -- as though a period Japanese, visiting Europe, were attempting to register his Mon with one of the kings of arms. Tomoe cannot be blazoned in European terms, and so cannot be considered compatible with European heraldry. This submission, though a splendid Japanese design, may not be registered in the Society. 11/92

Talan Gwynek. Badge. (fieldless) A mascle gules.


Withdrawn by the submitter. 07/92

Talan of Hastings. Device. Gules, a Bengal tiger rampant to sinister argent marked sable between three mullets argent, a bordure embattled Or.


The embattled line on the bordure was drawn too small to be identified from any distance. Indeed, all the charges were drawn too small in this submission. In the case of the tiger and mullets, it's more a question of drawing style; we'd simply instruct the submitter to "Draw the charges larger, to fill the available space". But in the case of the bordure, the charge's very identifiability is questionable.


If he resubmits with the charges correctly drawn, there should be no stylistic problems with the device. 09/92

Talan of Hastings. Badge. Gules, a Bengal tiger's head caboshed argent marked sable, a bordure embattled Or.


This conflicts with FitzGerard (Papworth 911): Gules, a leopard's head argent crowned Or. A leopard's head, by definition, is cabossed, so there's no change in posture; the type of cat's head, the markings, and the crown, are all worth no difference here. The only CD is for the bordure.


Additionally, the embattled bordure suffers from the same lack of identifiability as that of his device. You might show the submitter the emblazon of Leona Serwa, on this same LOI, as an example of how embattled bordures should be drawn. 09/92

Taliesynne Nycheymwrh yr Anghyfannedd. Household name and badge for Norrey Acadamie of Armorie. (fieldless) Two straight trumpets in saltire, surmounted by another palewise, the whole ensigned of a fleur-de-lys Nourrie between two lions combattant, all argent.


The name and badge had been previously returned in 1984 and 1989: the name for presumption and conflict with the Norroy King of Arms, the badge for complexity and infringement on the badge of the SCA College of Arms, and the combination of the two for appearing (by the use of elements from the English and SCA Colleges, the title and arms of Norroy, and the title of a classic heraldic text) to claim an official status unsuitable for a private household.


The submitter has provided a letter from J.P. Brooke-Little, current Norroy & Ulster King of Arms, granting permission to use the title. The submitter contends that our complexity standards have changed with the new Rules, so that this is no longer over-complex; and that, since the new Rules did not republish the List of Reserved Charges (which included the crossed trumpets of the College of Arms), those charges were no longer prohibited to him.


Stipulating, for the sake of argument, that Mr. Brooke-Little has the authority to grant permission, his letter still doesn't remove the problem of presumption -- which lies solely in the axioms of our historical re-creation, and is unaffected by permission. To borrow Lady Harpy's analogy, even if the Queen of England wrote a letter permitting someone to use Elizabeth of England, we wouldn't permit it, because the name is inconsistent with our rules against claiming unearned honors. (And to extend the analogy, even with such a letter, there'd still be a conflict -- not with the current Elizabeth of England, but with the one in period. Mr. Brooke-Little's permission does not automatically prevent infringement against the previous holders of the title Norroy.)


The List of Reserved Charges is still available, in the Glossary of Terms sold by the Stock Clerk, and is still in force. The use of the crossed trumpets is still reserved to the College of Arms; the only new submissions that may use them are the seals of Principal Heralds. Nor can one argue that the current submission, by using three trumpets instead of two, is clear of the problem. The design uses a reserved motif, and additional charges don't remove the presumption; that would be like saying that the use of one crown is reserved to Royal Peers, but the use of two crowns is not.


The issue of complexity is thornier. Some commenters suggested that, because the charges were conjoined, they formed a single group. That isn't necessarily the case: A mullet within and conjoined to an annulet has an obvious primary charge surrounded by a secondary charge. As drawn here, the lions and fleur-de-lys appear to be a separate group from the trumpets; thus, this does not appear to be a group of three dissimilar types of charge (soi-disant "slot-machine heraldry"). Whether the badge's visual confusion is now at acceptable levels is a separate issue; absent any supporting arguments, this must still be considered unacceptably complex for a fieldless badge. A more standard arrangement of charges would probably solve this.


The appeal did not address the problem of the use of elements from the armory of Norroy and the English College of Arms. In conjunction with the name and the trumpets, those elements highlight the problem of presumption; but they are not, in and of themselves, objectionable. Under a different household name, and in a badge without the crossed trumpets, they would likely be acceptable.


Finally, the LOI alluded to the submitter's heraldic rank and work in heraldic education. These are laudable, but not relevant to the problems of this badge. The appearance of a claim of official status in the SCA College of Arms would remain, whether the submitter were a herald or not; this is, after all, a personal badge for a household, with no official sanction. The infringement on the title of Norroy remains. Complex badges remain complex, despite the submitter's rank.


Three separate Laurel Sovereigns of Arms, over the span of a decade, have deemed this name and badge unacceptable. The submitter is hereby formally enjoined from their further use. If he resubmits with a less exalted household name, and a redesigned badge, he should have no stylistic problems. 12/92

Tamara Germain. Name.


The use of the Russian given name with the French surname violates our requirements for cultural contact, as outlined in Rule III.2. We need some evidence of period interaction between Russia and France. 10/92

Tamara the Seeker. Device. Per saltire argent, and sable fretty argent, in pale a rose sable, barbed and seeded proper, and a sinister gauntlet aversant clenched sable.


Under current precedent, fretty and a fret are artistic variants of the same charge. The submission therefore contains a single group of four primaries, of three different types: rose, gauntlet, and fretwork. This is disallowed per Rule VIII.1.a. Deleting the fretwork would remove the problem, assuming no conflicts.


It has been noted in the past (LoAR of July 92) that aversant clenched is probably the least identifiable posture for a hand or gauntlet. Please have her draw the fist with its thumb and fingers to the viewer when she resubmits, to promote recognition. 7/93

Tamás of Midian. Name.


The land of Midian is mentioned only in Exodus (Moses married a princess of Midian), and does not seem to have still existed by the time of Christ, when Thomas came into use as a name -- much less by medieval times, when the latter was modified by the Magyars to Tamás. As Lord Green Anchor notes, Rule III.2 requires multi-cultural names to show "regular contact between the cultures". While one might argue some contact (albeit one-way) between, say, Old English and Middle English, that argument cannot hold between the Sinai, c.1200 BC, and Hungary, c.1000 AD. These are as culturally incompatible as Aztec and Viking, and may not be used in this manner. 07/92

Tanarian Brenaur ferch Owain fab Bran. Household name and badge for Ty Oenigau o Buddug. Checky Or and gules, a winged ewe courant sable maintaining a sword Or.


The household name uses incorrect grammar: the Welsh preposition o causes the following word to mutate. Either Buddug would have to be changed to Fuddug, or the preposition deleted; the latter would have been more common in period Welsh. We would have corrected it, but for the main problem: the name claims relationship to a specific historical figure, Boadicea, which is forbidden per Rule V.5. This is no more registerable than Torquemada's Personal Guard or Richard Lionheart's Drinking Buddies.


The Or sword has insufficient contrast against the (partially) Or field. While maintained charges aren't as strictly bound by the Rule of Contrast as other charges, they still can't share a tincture with the field (v. Phillippa MacCallum, Sept 88). 10/92

Tancred Bras-de-Fer. Device. Purpure, on a bend Or, a lion's head jessant-de-lys between two acorns sable.


This conflicts with the arms of Dalling (Papworth 242): Ermine, on a bend Or three acorns proper. There is a CD for tincture of the field. The tertiaries' tincture has been changed, from brown to black, but tertiary tincture alone is not worth a CD even under Rule X.4.j.ii. The change of type of 1/3 of the charges, and the inversion of the other 2/3, don't contribute difference; only changes that "affect the whole group of charges" count towards a CD.

Against the arms of Brabazon (Papworth 253), Gules, on a bend Or three mullets sable, there is again a CD for field tincture. A prior case (Gavin Malcoeur de Logres, LoAR of Jan 92, p.16) suggests that, when the tertiary group has two types of charge, the device is too complex for X.4.j.ii to be applied. However, Gavin's submission also had a multiply-parted field; I suspect it was the total complexity of the device that prevented the use of X.4.j.ii -- not the use of two types of tertiary per se. I would have no compunction in calling the current submission clear of Brabazon. (Of course, the conflict with Dalling makes it moot for the nonce.) 09/92

Tassine de Bretagne. Device. Gules, a Scottish deerhound statant argent, on a chief Or two stags courant sable.


In general, period armory did not specify the type of dog used as charges, preferring to blazon them more generically (talbot, leveret, etc.). It's considered poor style in SCA armory, but permitted for known period breeds. No documentation was presented to show that the Scottish deerhound is a period breed. My own reference (Simon and Schuster's Guide to Dogs, edited by Elizabeth Meriwether Schuler) says only that "The origin of the deerhound is not known" (p.316). We suggest she resubmit with a talbot or a greyhound. 01/93

Tatiana of Varena. Device. Per fess invected gules and vert, a sea-unicorn and in chief two recorders in chevron Or.


Per fess invected of two colors overlain by a charge is not allowed, per Rule VIII.3. We suggest using a plain field division. 10/93

Terra Pomaria, Barony of. Badge. Azure, three chevronels braced, in chief an armored arm fesswise embowed brandishing a sword argent.


This conflicts with the arms of Wyville (Foster 211): Azure, three chevrons braced argent. There's a single CD, for adding the charges in chief. 01/93

Terrill ferch Mordeyrn. Name.


Terrill is documented only as a surname (v. Reaney DBS 350), not as a given name in period. It also happens to be the submitter's mundane middle name. Rule II.4 permits the submitter to use her mundane middle name as her SCA middle name; to use it as any other part of the SCA name requires evidence that the usage is appropriate. We have no evidence in this instance. 01/93

Thalassia de Rijkaard. Device. Azure, five compass stars in annulo argent and a base engrailed barry engrailed argent and azure.


This conflicts with the arms of the State of Victoria, Australia: Azure, five mullets (of seven, seven, six, five and eight points) in a representation of the Southern Cross argent. (The arms were granted in 1870. The badge of Victoria, which is the form quartered into the arms of Australia, includes an Imperial crown proper in chief; but that crown was not added until 1877. Crampton's Complete Guide to Flags, p.125.) There's a CD for the addition of the base, but not for the placement, or number of points, of one of the five mullets. 8/93

Theodora Delamore. Device. Per bend indented sable and vert, in sinister chief a unicorn salient argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Windsor, A unicorn argent (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges p. 159). Unicorns are rampant by default. There is only one CD for the addition of the field. If the submitter chooses to retain the unicorn as a charge on a resubmission, please instruct her as to the correct way to draw a unicorn rampant. 9/93

Theodora Delamore. Device. Per bend bevilled sable and vert, in sinister chief a unicorn salient argent.


As noted in the LoAR cover letter of 18 Sept 92, this is not a correctly drawn Per bend bevilled; it follows neither the example of Per bend bevilled found in period heraldic tracts, nor is it a valid extrapolation from the documented bend bevilled. Added to the fact that such bevilled fields were never used with charges, the whole becomes unacceptable. 09/92

Theodora Jourdain. Device. Sable, on a lozenge Or a lozenge purpure charged with a fleur-de-lys Or.


This was blazoned on the LOI as Or, on a lozenge purpure a fleur-de-lys Or, all within a bordure sable. However, the equal-width parallel stripes gave an overwhelming appearance of a sable field and a gold lozenge charged with a purple lozenge, charged with a fleur. (Since the black stripe is as wide as the gold stripe, the former can hardly be a bordure, and the latter can't very well be fimbriation.) As such, the device must be returned for the use of a quaternary charge. We'd suggest redrawing this to make it clear that the Or "stripe" is, in fact, the field. 03/93

Theodric Alastair Wulfricson. Device. Sable, a pall Or between an increscent and two pairs of swords in saltire argent.


This conflicts with the badge of Bertrand de Flammepoing (SCA): Sable, a pall Or fimbriated of flame proper. There's a CD for the secondary charges, but the complex fimbriation of the pall is worth no difference. 08/92

Thomas Britton. Badge. (fieldless) On a compass star sable, a lion's head erased argent.


Conflicts with Rudiger Macklin (SCA): Argent scaly vert, on a compass star nowed and elongated to base sable, a winged ram salient argent. There's a CD for the field, but nothing for type of tertiary on a complex charge. 10/92

Thomas Britton. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a lion rampant and on a chief indented argent three lozenges sable.


The indentations of the chief should be much larger: medieval emblazons of indented chiefs normally had three large indents. The submitted "pinking-shear" line has been a reason for return ere now (v. College of Caer Daibhidh, July 90). 07/92

Thomas du Lac. Badge resubmission for House of the Open Door. Gyronny argent and azure, a fleur-de-lys within a bordure sable.


While adding the bordure has removed the previous conflict, it has introduced another. This conflicts with John Sydeserf (Lyon Ordinary I, #2665): Argent, a fleur-de-lys within a bordure sable. There's a single CD, for the field. 12/92

Thomas Hill. Name and device. Azure, a lion statant within a bordure Or.


The name conflicts with Thomas Hill (1818-1891), Unitarian clergyman and president of Harvard. He's listed in general references (Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.711), so is important enough to protect.


The device has several conflicts, of which the closest is the arms of Edmund Bromfeld (Papworth 73): Azure, a lion statant Or. There's a single CD, for the bordure. It also conflicts with Arundell (Papworth 118), Azure, a lion rampant within a bordure Or, with a single CD for the posture of the beast. There are several other conflicts, each with one of the above point counts. 05/93

Thomas of Abraxa. Name.


Abraxa does not appear to be a valid period placename. Its sole use as a placename was in Thomas More's 1516 novel Utopia as the original name of the island of Utopia. The submitter has argued, in an appeal of a return by Lord Vesper, that this demonstrates Abraxa to have been considered a plausible placename in period.


The appeal forgets that More's Utopia is an allegory, with its names being descriptive. They are no more to be taken as valid than the names Pride or Goodman, from medieval morality plays. Given that abraxas is far better documented as a type of incantation or amulet (OED; 1990 E.Brit., vol.1, p.38), we cannot consider it compatible with period toponymic construction -- or, indeed, with period bynames in general -- without better evidence.


The armory was registered under the holding name Nigel of Saint Bartholomew's College. 01/93

Thomas Smith. Device. Per fess azure and vert, a crane displayed, wings in annulo argent.


(The submitter's name was returned Oct 92.) This conflicts with the Mon of Mori et.al. (Hawley 48): Dark, a crane displayed, wings in annulo light. Against mundane Mon we grant a CD for fieldlessness (tincturelessness); the second needed CD must come from some change not involving tincture. This submission has no such change; and the birds are in exactly identical postures. 12/92

Thomas Smith. Name.


This conflicts with Sir Thomas Smith (b.1513), the Elizabethan statesman who negotiated the Treaty of Troyes; and with Sir Thomas Smythe (b.1558), who helped found the Colony of Virginia. Both gentlemen are cited in general references (E.Brit., vol.10. p.906; Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.1377), and both are important enough to protect. 10/92

Thomas Tremayne. Device resubmission. Azure, a pale bretessed Or between two bears combattant argent.


While the bretessing has brought this clear of the previous conflict, it has introduced another. This now conflicts with the arms of Paola (Rietstap): Azure, a pale bretessed Or. There's a single CD, for the addition of the secondaries. 01/93

Thorfinn Asleifsson the Solemn. Device. Per pale sable and Or, an increscent and a decrescent conjoined counterchanged.


Due to the way they're drawn, the "crescents" cojoined are visually indistinguishable from a millrind. This therefore conflicts with Kathrine of Bristol (SCA): Per pale sable and Or, three millrinds counterchanged. There's a single CD, for number of millrinds. 04/93

Thorfinn Magnisen. Name.


The correct Danish for "son of Magni" would appear to be Magnasen. Under either spelling, however, this conflicts with the name of Thorfinn Magnusson, registered Aug 90. 07/92

Thorgrim Bjarnisson. Device. Argent, a bend sinister between a sword inverted and a battle-ax sable.


Conflict with Bisset (Papworth, p. 183) Argent, a bend sinister gules, there is only one CD for the addition of the secondaries. 3/92

Thorgrímr Gautsson. Device. Gules, a snake nowed and on a chief argent three axes argent, hafted gules.


Though blazoned on the LOI as sable, the axes' heads were colored silvery grey on the submission forms -- in other words, argent, with insufficient contrast on the argent chief. 01/93

Thorun Geiri. Device. Argent, a raven contourny sable, on a chief vert two fencing foils in saltire argent.


The charges on the chief were blazoned as rapiers, but drawn as modern fencing foils. While the LOI noted that the submitter would be told how to draw the charges henceforth, this doesn't make the device, as submitted, acceptable. We can wink at minor emblazonry problems, but not blatantly non-period artifacts. Nor could we document these as period swords: of the examples we found, the swords with cup-hilts did not have a fencing-foil handgrip; the one example of a sword with this grip (a 14th Century estoc) did not have a cup-hilt.


Either this form of rapier must be documented, or the device redrawn with period rapiers. 09/92

Thorvald Darkbow Mac an Ghabhann. Device. Sable, a griffin sejant affronty, wings displayed argent, holding to its chest a sword inverted gules, hilted Or, on a chief argent two arrows inverted in saltire sable.


The arrows are drawn in a non-period style, with invisible points and fletching. When he resubmits, please also have him draw the sword so that it lies entirely on the griffin, for better contrast. 09/92

Thorvald Redhair. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A pheon inverted gules.


While inverting the pheon has removed the previous conflict, it has introduced another. This conflicts with the arms of Ottikon (Rietstap): D'argent à une phéon de gueules, la pointe en haut (Argent, a pheon, point to chief gules). There's a single CD for the field. 04/93

Thorvald Redhair. Badge. (fieldless) A pheon per pale gules and argent.


As above, this conflicts with the English Royal badge: A broadarrow. The Royal badge is tinctureless, so there's a CD for fieldlessness; but there is no difference for the line of partition here, and no difference for broadarrow vs. pheon. 09/92

Thorvald Redhair. Household badge resubmission. (fieldless) A pheon per pale purpure and Or.


The previous submission for House Redhair (A pheon purpure) was returned Feb 92 for conflict with the English Royal badge: A broadarrow. This resubmission, with the pheon divided per pale, was supported by a Laurel ruling that granted a CD for lines of division on tinctureless badges: "The assumption (until proven otherwise) is that mundane [tinctureless] badges were displayed only in solid tinctures (including the furs)." (LoAR of Feb 92, p.10)


Evidence disproving that assumption has now been found. The badge of the Lords de la Warre was a crampet -- that is, the metal ferrule at the end of a scabbard. This badge was displayed both in solid tinctures (Or) and in party tinctures (Per pale azure and argent). Thus tinctureless badges were not displayed only in solid tinctures. See the cover letter for a more complete discussion of this issue.


This must again be returned for conflict with the tinctureless Royal badge. There's no difference for broadarrow vs. pheon. There's a CD for fieldlessness (tincturelessness), but per Rule X.4.d, the second CD must come from some category of difference that does not involve tincture -- which means lines of division or partition do not count. 09/92

Tigar of Toddington. Device resubmission. Paly gules and Or, an escallop inverted sable.


This conflicts with the badge of Ceridwen de Bellême, registered April 92: (fieldless) An escallop inverted sable. There's a single CD, for the field. 07/92

Tigranes of Bezabde. Badge. (fieldless) On a sun Or, a bull's head cabossed sable.


This conflicts with Kourost Bernard of East Woods (SCA), Sable, a sun ecliped Or; and Stefan of Seawood (SCA), Azure, on a sun Or an eagle displayed sable. In each case, there's a CD for fieldlessness, but change to type of tertiary charge is not worth a second CD here. 11/92

Timoteo Hilario e Fraga. Badge. Potent, a dragon passant regardant vert.


This conflicts with the arms of O'Neylan (Papworth 984): Gules, a dragon statant vert. There's a CD for the field, but not for the posture. Also with Burchenshaw (ibid): Argent, a wivern holding up the dexter foot vert. Again, a CD for the field, but nothing for posture, and nothing for dragon vs. wyvern. 08/92

Timoteo Hilario e Fraga da Vega. Name change from Timoteo Hilario e Fraga; appeal.


The submitter's last submission, in this form, was returned Oct 90 for combining Portuguese and Spanish in a single phrase, in violation of Rule III.2.a. He has appealed this return, asserting that Portuguese and Spanish were essentially dialects of the same language until 1495; that Vega was a common surname in Galicia, not found elsewhere; and that a Spanish element in a Portuguese phrase retains its Spanish form.


Unfortunately, the submitter has provided no evidence whatsoever to support these assertions. I would not be surprised to learn that his statements were correct; but we need something more than bald statements if we're to override the Rules. Pending documentation, this must again be returned. 09/92

Timothy of Arindale. Badge. Per bend sinister Or and sable, a sinister gauntlet aversant sustaining a club fesswise reversed, and a seal sejant contourny counterchanged.


The three charges are of equal visual weight, making this a group of three dissimilar charges (colloquially known as "slot-machine heraldry"). This must be returned, per Rule VIII.1.a.

The design of the badge does not appear to be offensive. Lord Crescent is probably correct in thinking that the submission of Haus Robbenschlage, earlier on the LOI, sensitized the College to any suggestion of seal-clubbing. But given the constant heraldic use of weapons (maces, swords, axes, etc.) with animals, this design by itself is unremarkable. 11/92

Timur Baatour Khitai. Name.


Baatour is a Mongolian title analogous to "knight"; in the variant spelling Bahadur, it has been reserved as a Society title, for use by Mongol-persona Knights, on the LoAR cover letter of 13 Sept 89. As such, it may not be registered in a name. The submitter forbade any changes to his name. 09/92

Tirlach Kinsella. Device. Purpure, a compass star argent and overall a lion's head cabossed Or.


As drawn, the compass star is almost completely obscured by the lion's head, rendering it unidentifiable. Charges must be drawn so as to be recognizable, per Rule VIII.3. Visually, the star's rays blend with the lion's mane, making it almost a sun in splendour Or; as such, it's very close to the device of Bruce of Brandy Hall (SCA), Purpure, on a sun Or a dagger gules.

Some of the commentary mentioned possible conflict between this "irradiated lion's face" and a lion's face jessant-de-lys -- e.g. Bruagh (Papworth 911), Gules, a leopard's head Or jessant a fleur-de-lys argent. I believe there's a visible difference between the straight rays shown here and a fleur-de-lys' curved petals; the submission should be clear of Bruagh, if nothing else. 09/92

Tobias Alan MacKenzie. Device. Per pale azure and argent, a butterfly counterchanged and a base rayonny gules.


The rayonny line of the base is too small to be seen at any distance. This must be returned for lack of identifiability; if the submitter redraws it with fewer and larger rayons, it should be acceptable style. 01/93

Tokugawa Basha. Badge. Sable, five hollyhock leaves within and slips conjoined to a five-lobed melon enclosure argent.


(The name was returned on the LoAR of May 1993). The badge conflicts with Oda Nobunaga, Dark, a cherry blossom within a five-lobed melon enclosure light; and with Oda Hidenobu, Miya et al., Oda, Iida, and Magabuchi, Dark, <various similar blossoms> within a five-lobed melon enclosure light. (Hawley and Chappelear, pp. 18-19). The five hollyhock leaves arranged in this manner do not provide sufficient visual difference from the cited armories. (Historical note: Oda Nobunaga, while not actually Shogun, did rule Japan in the late 1500's. His assassination sparked Tokugawa Iyeyasu's drive towards the Shogunate.)


In future resubmissions, the client should avoid potential visual conflicts with a white rose. 10/93

Tokugawa Basha. Name.


"It has previously been determined that, as far as the College of Arms is concerned, the names of the clans with an hereditary claim to the shogunate of Japan are equivalent to the surnames of royal families in Europe, and so may not be registered. I agree with this decision, and am upholding it. Tokugawa may not be used." [BoE, 18 May 86] I agree with this decision, and am upholding it. Tokugawa may not be used.


Moreover, Basha "cart" does not follow the pattern for Japanese given names. Of the examples of physical objects used as names (or name components), none are of man-made objects; only natural objects, such as flowers, are found as names. Basha cannot be formed from themes found in O'Neill's Japanese Names. Without better evidence, we cannot register this name. 05/93

Torric of Three Mountains. Name change to Torric inn Bjarni (appeal).


The originally submitted name, Torric inn Bjarni, was returned July 91 for using a given name in a phrase that required a common noun. This appeal noted that, in Old Norse, bjorn (Bjorn) is both a common noun meaning "bear" and a given name derived therefrom. Since Bjarni is a given name derived from Bjorn, and since the latter means "bear", then (it was argued) Bjarni must also mean "bear" and be useable as a common noun.


The argument is based on the fallacy that "names have meanings". It's true that many given names are derived from common nouns: some of these are identical to their root nouns (e.g. Victor). But given names only putatively have "meanings"; by their use as names, they are divorced from their derivations. The meaning of the name Thomas is "Thomas; a given name, used by our third President". It no longer can be used as a synonym for "twin".


The fallacy is compounded by assuming that a hypocoristic -- a name derived from a name -- still keeps the same "meaning" as the original form. To use the above example: the common noun victor could be used as an epithet, e.g. John the Victor. The given name Victor has a hypocoristic form, Vic. That does not mean John the Vic is an acceptable name: though Victor may once have meant "victor", vic does not and never did.


The examples in Geirr Bassi of the epithets bjarneyja (bear island) and bjarnvlr (bear warmth) do not support bjarni as a noun. In both those cases, bjarn- is in the genitive case ("of the bear"), not the nominative needed here. The nominative remains björn.

The submitter could be Torric Bjarni, dropping the article and using Bjarni as the given name it is. He could be Torric inn Björn, "Torric the Bear", Torric inn Bjarki, "Torric the Bear Cub", or Torric inna Bjarna, "Torric of the Bears". But without real evidence of bjarni as a common noun, he may not be inn Bjarni. As he permits no changes to his name, this must be returned. 07/92

Tostig Logiosophia. Badge. (fieldless) On a billet fesswise Or, three compass stars azure.


The billet is one of the charges used for armorial display, and thus (per Rule XI.4) may not be charged with more than one tertiary. This is especially true for fieldless badges, where such charged billets look like displays of independent armory. (See also the LoAR of 8 June 86, p.7.) 09/92

Trimaris, Kingdom of. Title for Osprey Pursuivant Extraordinary.


Exact conflict with the Osprey Pursuivant, registered to the Kingdom of Atlantia. It also conflicts with the Shire of the Osprey, in Meridies. 12/92

Trimaris, Kingdom of. Title for Dinghy Herald.


Dinghy is an Indian word, with its earliest citation in the OED dated to 1794. We need evidence of its period use before we can register it as an heraldic title. 05/93

Trimaris, Kingdom of. Name resubmission for the Order of Black Widows.


The name had been previously returned for conflict with Widow's Abbey; for use of the name of an animal not known to period Europeans; and because the College did not wish to appear to endorse an Order that discriminated by gender. The first and third of these issues have been addressed, by permission in one case, by revising the charter of the Order in the other. However, the second issue remains: the phrase black widow has not been demonstrated to be period, either as the name of a spider or anything else.


In conversation, Lord Lymphad has informed me that the phrase was used in period to refer to rapacious women, and that it was given to the spider as an allusion to that usage. He hasn't supported this assertion with documentation, however; and my own efforts at documenting the phrase turned up empty. (The closest I came were some late-period adages to the effect of "Beware of the woman thrice-widowed." It's much the same sentiment, but not helpful in this case.)


While I concede that the words black and widow are period words, the phrase black widow is a modern construction. As with the Artemisian Tank Corps (returned Feb 91), though the parts of the name may be period, the name as a whole is decidedly modern. In previous appeals, the submitters have made clear that the Order's name specifically referred to the black widow spider; and that's certainly how the name will be perceived. No evidence has yet been produced that the spider was known to medieval Europeans, or even to anyone prior to the 19th Century. (It didn't even get the name black widow until the early 20th Century.) Without such evidence, we will not register the creature, by name or in armory.


With regard to the possible conflict with the Marvel comic book character the Black Widow, I believe such character names should only be protected if the name is likely to be known outside the ranks of comic book aficionados. Superman, Spiderman, Wonder Woman, for instance, are well-known enough to be protected; the Black Widow is not. (She's a background character in the Marvel universe; she doesn't even rate her own book.) See the cover letter for a further discussion of this issue. 10/92

Trimaris, Kingdom of. Name resubmission for the Order of the Morningstar of Trimaris.


Withdrawn by the Principal Herald. 7/93

Tristan Blackmoor of Darkwoods. Name for House Shadowglade.


The household name does not appear to follow period exemplars. For one thing, it's nonsense: by definition, a glade is a sunny area. For another thing, we've no period documentation of shadow- used as a theme in English placenames. While I might have stretched that point for an otherwise-acceptable construction, I can't see period houses using such an oxymoron as this. Without further evidence, this must be returned. 08/92

Tristan of Landhelm. Device. Quarterly counter-ermine and argent, in bend sinister two pairs of annulets interlaced bendwise sinister gules.


The quarterly field division must be used carefully, to avoid the appearance of marshalled armory. Rule XI.3 sets out what designs will appear to be marshalled: the use of more than one charge per quarter is unacceptable in this context. This must be returned. If he used a single annulet in each argent quarter, or a group of two linked annulets overlying the line of division, it would be acceptable (assuming no conflicts). 9/93

Tristram du Bois. Device. Argent, a sinister canton purpure.


This conflicts with von Schönau (Rietstap): Argent, a sinister canton gules. There is a single CD, for tincture of the canton.


This also conflicts, though less obviously, with the device of Phillip of the Valley of Sleep (SCA): Argent, a chief indented purpure. Neither Phillip's nor Tristram's armory contains a primary charge, so Rule X.2 does not apply. Thus there is a single CD, for type of peripheral secondary charge: the indented line is specifically part of the type change, per X.4.e.


I'm unhappy with the latter conflict, but I see no way around it as the Rules currently stand. Rule X.2, subtitled "Difference of Primary Charges", specifically applies only when "the type of primary charge is substantially changed." Neither the chief, nor the canton, nor any peripheral ordinary, can be a primary charge; otherwise, by Rule X.1 Lozengy bendwise azure and argent, a canton gules would be clear of Bavaria, and Gyronny sable and Or, a bordure gules would be clear of Campbell. That would be unacceptable; therefore a peripheral ordinary can't be the primary charge, even when it's the only charge in the design. And that, in turn, leads to conflicts like the current case. It may be moot today, because of the additional conflict against von Schönau, but other cases will follow tomorrow.


In the long run, the best solution would be to find another wording for X.2, so that it could apply in some cases to charges other than primaries. How to do this, and still return the cases we want returned (and keep the Rule simple enough to use!), is a challenge. Lord Palimpsest and I welcome commentary on this issue. 07/92

Tristram Telfor. Device. Per bend sinister wavy argent and purpure.


This conflicts with the arms of Hairspeckh: Taillé-ondé argent sur sable (Per bend sinister wavy argent and sable) (Renesse). There is only a single CD for the change of tincture for the bottom half of the field.


This also conflicts with the badge of the Barony of the Cleftlands, Per bend sinister nebuly argent and azure (SCA). There is a CD for the change to tincture, but none for the difference between nebuly and wavy: there are simply too many examples of these lines being used interchangeably, even in late period. (The arms of Blount: Barry nebuly/wavy Or and sable (DBA, p. 96) are the best known example.) Even the late period tracts, the first citations of nebuly as an independent complex line, give wide variation in its depiction: Bossewell, 1572, gives a number of different forms of nebuly (fo. 29, 56 and 76), two of which are indistinguishable from his depictions of undy or wavy (fo. 100 and 123). If wavy and nebuly were so indistinguishable in period, we can grant no CDs between them in the SCA. 9/93

Trygge fråm Holmgård. Device. Per bend sable and argent, a longship counterchanged, a bordure rayonny gules.


As drawn, the rayonny line is impossible to distinguish from any distance. Period heraldic art normally rendered complex lines boldly. This needs to be redrawn so it can be identified, per Rule VIII.3. 08/92

Turmstadt, Shire of. Device. Vert, three piles Or, overall in pale a laurel wreath counterchanged and a gateway argent.


A complex charge such as a laurel wreath cannot be counterchanged over an ordinary. This was last reaffirmed with the submission of the Shire of Blackmoor Keep (LoAR of Oct 92).

Further, the gateway was ruled unacceptable for use in SCA armory (on the LoAR of Sept 93). We would probably have allowed a "grace period" for this submission, had the problems of counterchanging not caused it to be returned; but such a grace period will have expired by the time they resubmit. Please have them use a door, portcullis, gate, or other more standard heraldic charge. 10/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Badge. Azure, a pall inverted embattled argent.


(This was intended to be the populace badge.) The crenellations on the pall are too small and numerous to be identified from any distance. Period embattled lines were drawn boldly, more like the pall on their device submission. This must be returned for redrawing. 04/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Name and badge for the Order of the Moonflower. Azure, a pall inverted embattled between two moons in their plenitude and a moonflower slipped and leaved argent.


The moonflower does not appear to have been known to period Europeans, at least by that name: the OED's first citation of the word dates only to 1787, and the flower itself is native to North America. We need evidence of the period use of the term before we can register it in an order name, and evidence of period knowledge of the flower before it can be used in a badge.


Additionally, the crenellations on the pall are too small and numerous to be identified from any distance. Period embattled lines were drawn boldly, more like the pall on their device submission. This must be returned for redrawing. 04/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Badge. Azure, on a pall inverted bretessed between in chief two moons in their plenitude argent, another azure.


(This was submitted as a badge for l'Ordre de la Lune Bleue.) The crenellations on the pall are too small and numerous to be identified from any distance. Period embattled lines were drawn boldly, more like the pall on their device submission. This must be returned for redrawing. 04/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Badge. Azure, on a pall inverted bretessed between in chief two moons in their plenitude argent, a spiked mace gules.


(This was submitted as a badge for the Order of the Crimson Mace.) The crenellations on the pall are too small and numerous to be identified from any distance. Period embattled lines were drawn boldly, more like the pall on their device submission. This must be returned for redrawing. 04/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Name and badge for the Order of the Silver Moon. Azure, a pall inverted bretessed between three moons in their plenitude argent.


The order name conflicts with the Order of the Moon, registered to the Barony of Carolingia. The addition of the adjective is insufficient, per Rule V.2.


The crenellations on the pall are too small and numerous to be identified from any distance. Period embattled lines were drawn boldly, more like the pall on their device submission. This must be returned for redrawing. 04/93

Twin Moons, Barony of. Badge. Azure, a sheaf of arrows inverted Or between in fess two moons in their plenitude argent.


(This was intended to be a badge for the Baronial archers.) This conflicts with the arms of Bout (Rietstap): D'azur à trois flèches émoussée à tête carrée d'or, deux passées en sautoir et la troisième brochant en pal (Azure, three arrows with blunted heads, two in saltire and the third palewise overall Or). The Continental default for arrows is with points to chief, so there's no difference for orientation; the only CD is for the addition of the moons. 04/93

Tybalt Seagrim. Device. Gules, a pithon erect contourny argent within a bordure barry wavy argent and azure.


This had been pended from the Dec 92 meeting, for two reasons: to allow for conflict checking under the correct blazon (that in the LOI having given the wrong tincture for the pithon), and to garner commentary on the identifiability of the barry wavy division of the bordure. The responses from the College persuade me that the barry wavy division will not be recognizable in this design: so little of the waves show that it's impossible to tell the bordure is, indeed, barry wavy. If the submitter is trying for a cant on his surname, we'd suggest simply putting a pithon on a barry wavy field. 05/93

Tymoteusz Konikokrad. Device. Or, in pale two orcas naiant sable marked argent.


This conflicts with Joanna Melissa Roncivalle (SCA): Or, in pale two bottlenosed dolphins naiant, that in chief contourny, sable. There's a CD for the posture of half the group, but nothing for type; and the markings are artistic details, worth no difference. 09/92

Tyne of Lostwithiel. Device. Azure, a sea-serpent erect within a bordure argent.


The sea-serpent is not drawn in a style that would allow it to be reproduced from the blazon: it isn't really erect, but muliply coiled and queue-fourchy. Although we allow a certain amount of artistic leeway, reproducibility from the blazon is a requirement. 01/93

Tyrkir von Bremen. Device. Per bend sinister bevilled argent and sable, three wolves' teeth issuant from dexter gules and a furison inverted bendwise sinster argent.


This device was originally returned on 23 August 1993 for using an emblazon of per bend sinister bevilled which was at best two logical steps away from period evidence. Given evidence that such fields were never used with charges, the submission was unacceptable. I also referred to the cover letter for a full discussion.


In my cover letter of 18 September 1992, I discussed the period support for the use of per bend sinister bevilled. Referencing Legh's Accidence of Armory, 1586, I concluded "I haven't yet determined whether this was an actual coat, or was one of Legh's inventions to illustrate his book; but he does make it clear that the bevilled field should not be charged." In discussing the previous version of this submission I noted citations in the documentation also were uncharged. I stated that I "might even accept them used with charges (in a balanced way), despite the indications that charges weren't used with these fields in period." I concluded the discussion by leaving open of Per bend (sinister) bevilled for SCA use and stated that if this were "resubmitted with correctly drawn bevilling (and perhaps a more balanced use of charges)", the College would consider it.


This resubmission only partially corrected the problem with the emblazon; the horizontal "zag" being replaced by a vertical one. However, per bend sinister line still doesn't originate from the sinister chief corner. It now orginates from the sinister side of the shield instead of the top of the shield. This line of partition still needs to be emblazoned correctly to be acceptable. In addition, the unbalanced nature of the device has not been improved. The combination of the gules wolves' teeth starting from the dexter side of the shield with the nonstandard orientation of the furison, make the submission unacceptable. 9/93

Tyrkir von Bremen. Device. Per bend sinister bevilled argent and sable, three wolves' teeth issuant from dexter gules and in sinister base a furison inverted bendwise sinister argent.


See the cover letter for a full discussion of Party bevilled. Neither the period discussions of Per bend bevilled nor an extrapolation from a bend bevilled would support the emblazon shown here; nor can it be accurately blazoned without resorting to barbarisms such as Per bend sinister bevilled fesswise. I'd be willing to accept Per bend (sinister) bevilled, as being one logical step from period evidence -- if drawn in a correct manner, with the middle "zag" palewise. The form shown here is two steps removed from the evidence, which is correspondingly harder to swallow. Given evidence that such bevilled fields were never used with charges, the whole becomes unacceptable. 08/92

Uilleam Catach ó Maoilbhreanainn. Name change to Liam Catach ó Maoilbhreanainn.


Liam doesn't appear to have been a period diminutive of Uilleam. All the sources that cite Liam do so as a modern diminutive; the period diminutive was Uillec. Without evidence of period use, we can't register Liam. We suggest he try Uillec. 07/92

Ulf Bjornson. Name.


The byname should be in the documented form Björnsso, with a double-S. However it's spelled, the name conflicts with Wulf Beornsson, registered Sept 88. The two names are cognates, and are audially indistinct. 03/93

Una of Blackberry Hollow. Household name for Díon na Sméar Dubh.


The household name was intended to mean "shelter of the blackberry". However, the word chosen for "shelter", díon, is an abstract noun, not a concrete noun. (As Lady Harpy put it, díon means "shelter" in the sense of "I was protected from the attacking dog by the shelter of the blackberries.") Consequently, we cannot consider Díon to be a group designation, as required by Rule III.1.b; and none of the commenters could suggest a more concrete substitute, without knowing the submitter's exact intent. This must be returned for consultation.


Note that the correct Irish for "of the blackberry" would use the genitive case: na Sméir Duibhe. 10/92

Una of Blackberry Hollow. Badge. (fieldless) A blackberry slip vert, fructed sable.


Conflicts with several mundane badges, of which the closest is the plant badge of Clan MacLean: (Fieldless) [A sprig of] Blackberry proper. (Fox-Davies' Book of Badges p. 123) 10/92

Unwod the Lapp. Name and device. Vert, a water lily in profile argent.


Unwod is not a given name, but an epithet meaning roughly "unfrenzied". No evidence was supplied to show it was used as a given name, and without such evidence we can't register it as a given name. As for the byname, there was some concern that the term was uncomplimentary -- the OED compares Lapp to the MHG lappe "simpleton" -- but that's a matter for the submitter and his persona. More to the purpose is the fact that Lapp, as an English term (which it must be, following the English article the) can be dated in the OED only to 1859. The period English terms for a Laplander are Lappian (1599), Lapponian (1607), and possibly Laplander (1637).


The device has multiple conflicts, of which the closest is the device of Katja Dara (SCA): Per chevron vert and sable, a lotus flower [in profile] argent. There's also the device of Arabella Cleophea Winterhalter (SCA): Purpure ermined Or, a lotus blossom in profile argent. In each case, there's a CD for the field, but nothing for type or posture of flower.


Against the badge of India (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.117), [fieldless] A lotus argent, a check of the annotated edition of his Complete Guide to Heraldy suggests that the lotus is affronty in that badge; we get a CD for the field and a CD for posture. Against the device of Oewyn nic Neill, reblazoned elsewhere on this LoAR (Per fess Or and azure, a water lily blossom affronty argent seeded Or), a similar point count holds. Finally, against the device of Sibylla Penrose of Netherhay, registered July 92 (Vert, an octofoil argent), I'd give a CD for type and a CD for posture of the flower; I'm less certain of this call, however, and would be willing to entertain arguments either way. (Not that such arguments are needed in this case.) 03/93

Urluin le Garlykemongere. Device. Per fess rayonny vert and Or, three Maltese crosses counterchanged.


The rayonny line of division is drawn too small to be visible from any distance. Medieval lines were drawn boldly, the better to be seen. This must be returned for redrawing. 10/92

Utto zur Duffel.Name.


Given Lord Palimpsest's examples of "oath bynames" -- that is, bynames taken from the owner's favorite oath (e.g., Mitgoczhilfen "With God's Help", 1397) -- the use of Teufel "[to the] Devil" is not unreasonable. Duffel appears to be a valid variant of Teufel, given the documented forms Deufel, Duvel. However, the name must still be grammatically correct. As Teufel (Duffel) is a masculine noun, the correct form of the oath would be zum Duffel, not zur Duffel (zur is for feminine nouns). Unfortunately, the submitter forbade any changes whatsoever, leaving us no choice but to return the name. 06/93

Vair Couvert, Shire of. Name change (from Encinal, Shire of).


The submitted name does not appear to be a correctly constructed toponymic. The intended meaning, according to the LOI, was "shady thicket noted for squirrels". However, in this context vair is a noun, not an adjective; and the one period example of couvert in a French place name cited in the commentary used it as an adjective. The submission's actual meaning is thus "hidden squirrel pelt" (or "hidden vair", referring to the heraldic tincture), which is highly implausible. At best, we would need explicit examples of "Hidden [animal/color]" before we could register this.


The shire permitted only specific alterations to the name, none of which would have solved the above problems. It must therefore be returned. If they're interested in the general sound of the name, Lord Palimpsest has suggested Bois Vairé, derived from a Latin given name Varius. If they prefer a placename associated with squirrels, Covert des Escuriuels (or Escuriaux) seems to be a medieval French form, according to Larousse's Nouveau Dictionnaire Étymologique. 06/93

Valentine Christian Warner. Device. Vert, three long caps Or, doubled ermine.


This conflicts with Vaux (Papworth 364): Azure, three Albanian bonnets Or. There's a CD for the field, but nothing for type of caps, and nothing for the tincture of their lining. 04/93

Valerian of Salisbury. Device. Per pale azure ermined Or and counter-ermine, a pair of wings displayed inverted argent.


This conflicts with Barnhouse (Papworth 1123), Sable, a pair of wings inverted and not conjoined but endorsed argent; and with Wyngefeld (Papworth 1122), Gules, two wings conjoined in lure argent. In each case there's a single CD, for the field.


Normally, this would have been pended, as the device was misblazoned on the LOI. However, the cited conflicts cause return regardless of the field. 11/92

Verginia Urdiales del Basque. Name.


The byname, del Basque, does not mean "of the woods" as the submitter thinks. In French, Le Pays Basque is the region on the Spanish/French border; the Spanish equivalent is los Provincias Vascongadas. The French term should not be used with the Spanish preposition; and in any event, "of the [adjective]" is not a usual epithet. We would have corrected the spelling, but the submitter forbade any changes whatsoever to her name. 09/92

Vincent Valentine. Device. Sable, a natural leopard rampant reguardant and on a chief Or, three hearts gules.


Conflicts with the arms of Brion (Papworth 104): Sable, a lion rampant and a chief Or. There's a CD for adding the tertiaries on the chief, but none for head posture or type of cat. 10/92

Vittorio Dominico Alberti di Calabria. Device. Per pale gules and sable, on a pale argent a fasces vert.


This conflicts with the arms of Iraq (Crampton's Flags of the World, p.55): Per pale gules and sable, on a pale argent three mullets vert. (Iraq's flag is their arms turned sideways.) There's a single CD, for changes to the tertiary charges. 8/93

Vladimir Andreivich Aleksandrov. Device. Sable, a wolf dormant guardant, in chief three chevronels inverted braced argent.


The dormant posture should be used carefully, as it can all too easily render a beast unidentifiable. In this case, the wolf's head, paws and tail are neatly tucked in, making him indistinguishable from a meatloaf. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.3. 01/93

Vladimir Heraldsson. Device. Or, a chevron écimé between two drakkars azure.


The chevron écimé does not appear to be a period charge. The single registration in the SCA of the term was in 1973 (Eiolf Eriksson); and that wasn't even a correct blazon for the device (which has been reblazoned elsewhere in this LoAR). The current submission would thus be the defining instance of the charge, and we need to see evidence of its use in period before allowing its registration. We will defer any discussion of its difference versus an ordinary chevron until its validity as a period charge has been demonstrated. 10/93

Walter of Hunter's Roost. Name and device. Argent, a linden tree eradicated proper, on a bordure vert three compass stars argent.


The Oxford English Dictionary cites roost as a verb applicable to humans, "to lodge, harbour, make one's abode," barely within the period of the S.C.A., dating to 1593. As a noun applicable to humans it's dated only to 1858. Prior to this, it appears only to be applied to birds. This locative construction seems unlikely; just as House of the Red Revelers' Roost was deemed unacceptable, June 1993 LoA&R, so must this.


The device seems acceptable, but it must be returned because the submitter would not accept any changes to his name, even the formation of a holding name. 9/93

Western Seas, Barony of. Badge. Or, a wa'a outrigger sable, a bordure engrailed azure.


This conflicts with Echlin (Papworth 1089): Or, an antique galley with sails furled sable, forked pennon proper. There's a CD for the bordure. Previous returns have granted no difference between a galley and a drakkar (LoAR of July 91, p.20); evidently, type of ship is left to artistic license. We'd welcome some further evidence on whether this is a reasonable policy to maintain; for now, we'll uphold precedent. 01/93

Wilhelmina Brant. Device change. Or, two ring-necked pheasants respectant proper, in chief three garden roses slipped and leaved vert.


The use of ring-necked pheasants proper and garden roses, when both have honest heraldic equivalents, violates our strictures against excessive naturalism, as outlined in Rule VIII.4.c.


Additionally, the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus torquatus) appears to be a 19th Century import from China, according to the 1911 E.Brit., vol.XXI, p.361. This wasn't noticed for her original submission, probably because the birds were heraldically tinctured; they could as easily have been any kind of pheasant, and indeed we've amended her current blazon accordingly. But when tinctured proper, the problem of compatibility can no longer be ignored; we would need evidence that this breed of pheasant was known to period Europeans before we could register it. 12/92

William Ashbliss. Name.


The name conflicts with William Ashbless, a major character in the award-winning novel The Anubis Gates, by Tim Powers. There's enough overlap between Society membership and science fiction fandom that we have to consider conflicts like these; and by the criteria set forth in the Administrative Handbook, the character is important enough to protect. 05/93

William Hayes. Name.


The name conflicts with Will Hays (full name William Harrison Hays), author of the Hays code of propriety for American motion pictures. He is listed in general references (e.g. the New Century Cyclopedia of Names, vol.II, p.1950), so he's important enough to protect. The use of the diminutive is worth no difference, per Rule V.4.c.


When considering conflict against an historical figure, we must consider all the names by which the figure is known; the removal of the middle name is thus usually insufficient difference. John Kennedy, for instance, would definitely conflict with John Fitzgerald Kennedy; Thomas Edison, with Thomas Alva Edison; and so on. See the case of Patrick MacManus, LoAR of March 92, p.14.

The submitter's armory was registered under the holding name William of the Outlands. 01/93

William of Lee. Change from holding name of William of Grey Niche.


The name still conflicts with William Lee, the inventor of the knitting machine, with whom it conflicted when first he submitted in Aug 89. The addition of the preposition of is worth no difference here. 08/92

William of Wealdsmere. Device appeal. Per chevron purpure and argent, in base an anvil sable, on a chief Or a hand sable.


The device had been returned for non-heraldic depiction of the anvil, on the LoAR of Aug 91: "The charge in base on the device does not match any heraldic anvil of which we are aware." The submitter has appealed the return, documenting the use of anvils in period (from an engraving of armorers at work, c.1502) and this particular form of anvil in heraldry (Clark's Introduction to Heraldry, 1899).


Unfortunately, neither piece of documentation addresses the reason for the previous return. The use of anvils in period (as artifacts or in heraldry) was never in doubt; what was needed was evidence that the anvil as drawn here is a period form. (It's not obvious that the charge is an anvil; as drawn, it looks more like the handle of a corkscrew. Artistic variants should either be recognizable, or documented.)


The citation from a 19th Century heraldry text does not necessarily show the anvil drawn here to be period; this form of anvil matches neither the artifact in the 1502 engraving nor the period heraldic anvil (shown in Bossewell's Armory of 1572, fo.124, which matches the illustration in Parker, p.13). Nor is this the blacksmith's anvil that has become the SCA default.


Pending evidence that this form of anvil was used either in period heraldry or as a period artifact, it must again be returned. 11/92

William Silverfox. Name appeal.


The previously submitted name, William the Silver Fox, was returned July 91 for conflict with Sir William Fox, a Prime Minister of New Zealand. The submitter has changed the name slightly, but still appeals the return, since it applies to his resubmitted name as well. He argues that protecting Sir William Fox is "a bit of a reach"; and that the addition of the prefixed Silver- is enough to bring it clear of conflict in any case, citing the registered name of William Blackfox as precedent.

On the first point, I concede the difficulty of deciding which historical figures are, or aren't, important enough to protect. One person's "famous character" is another's "obscure non-entity". The College requires some standard more objective than "Laurel's heard of him/her." We therefore accept the judgement of the editors who compile general references: the Encyclopedia Britannica, various general Biographical Dictionaries, etc. A name with its own entry in a general reference -- ideally, in several general references -- is deemed important to protect, per the Administrative Guidelines. Sir William Fox meets that criterion, and must therefore be protected.


On the second point, we have consistently interpreted Rule V.2 to mean that the addition of an adjective is insufficient difference between names. It hasn't mattered whether or not the adjective was attached to the noun it modified. To do otherwise would put us in the position of ruling that William the Silver Fox was a conflict, but William the Silverfox was not -- even though the meanings are identical, and the pronunciation only trivially changed. To avoid that, we've granted nothing for whether the adjective was attached. (As for William Blackfox, we must note that his name was registered back in 1981, when our standards of conflict and of historical importance were different.)


Until Rule V.2 is changed, this must be considered a conflict with Sir William Fox. This must again be returned. 04/93

William the Blacksmith. Name.


This technically conflicts with William Smith, the English geologist (1769-1839). He is listed in several general references (Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.1377), so he's important enough to protect. The addition of the modifier black is insufficient, per Rule V.2; and the presence or absence of a space between words doesn't seem significant here. If William the Black Smith would conflict, so must William the Blacksmith. 12/92

Windwardshire. Name.


The name conflicts with the Windward Islands, in the Lesser Antilles (West Indies). The islands are cited in general references (e.g. the 1911 E.Brit., vol.XXVIII, p.716), and so are important enough to protect. The change of designator (Islands, -shire) is worth no difference, per Rule V.4.d.


Two other possible problems with the name were mentioned in the commentary. The first was whether the name was constructed in a period manner. European colonization of the Windward Islands began in the early 1600s (CLG 2097); we assume they had acquired the name by then. Certainly, we can consider the name to be in the "grey area" of documentability between 1600 and 1650.


The second question, raised in the LOI, involved the use in the SCA, by a Society group, of the mundane name of the same group. Most of the officers and members of Windwardshire are mundanely the officers and members of the Windward Foundation, a 20th Century non-profit corporation. The Society does not permit its members to use their legal names as their SCA names, requiring some distance between modern and medieval identities; the prohibition is found in the Administrative Guidelines, Protected Items -- I: Any Name or Armory used by the Submitter outside the Society. The LOI raised the question as to whether the prohibition applied to groups as well as individuals.


A case could be made for maintaining some distance between modern and medieval identities, even for groups. The two most persuasive concerns are the need to avoid confusion, and the desire to not compel SCA members to join a modern group. The first concern can be better illustrated by, say, a campus group submitting the name of their college (e.g. a group at Santa Monica College, here in Caid, submitting the name College of Santa Monica). The second concern (which I hasten to note is as yet hypothetical!) would have the mundane group require membership in the mundane group as a condition for participating with the SCA group; it's irrelevant whether such a requirement were de jure or simply through social pressure.


The first concern was addressed by the commenters. Most of them felt that, just as simple non-identity prevented confusion between an individual's legal and Society names, it would prevent confusion between a group's legal and Society names. The mundane group is not called Windwardshire; the SCA group is never called anything else.


The other concern is not solely the province of the College of Arms. All the Powers That Be in a Kingdom should object to any illegal coercion such as I've described. A submissions herald might suspect, by a group's choice of name, that such coercion may be happening; if so, he should bring it to the attention of the Kingdom Seneschal, and the two officers should deal with the matter as seems best. (See the cover letter for a further discussion of the need for communication between Kingdom officers.) But the mere suspicion of possible future misconduct by a group is not, by itself, grounds for returning their name.

The problems are moot in this case: the conflict with the Windward Islands would prevent the Shire from using any close variant of their mundane name. But, although the issue is unlikely to arise again any time soon, the principles involved are worth keeping in mind. 8/93

Wlfric of Derneford. Household name for House Edstuna.


The name has not been documented adequately; in particular, the examples of Swedish placenames ending in -tuna, "town", all seem to begin with personal names (e.g. Ultuna, "Ulf's tuna"). Ed- was not intended to be a personal name, but an Old Norse verb -- but no documentation was provided for the assertion, and none of the commenters could provide any. Failing evidence that either (1) Ed- is a Swedish personal name, or that (2) Ed- is a valid ON verb, and that -tuna can be used with such verb forms, this must be returned. 11/92

Wolfgang of Flame. Name.


The byname does not seem to be acceptable style. The submitter is from the Barony of the Flame; Wolfgang of the Flame would thus be acceptable. Following the example of his Baron and Baroness, he could also be Wolfgang Flame. But just as those nobles do not style themselves Baron and Baroness of Flame, so is his submitted byname incorrect. As he forbade any changes to his name, this must be returned. 01/93

Wolfram der Jäger. Badge. Or, a bend azure, overall an oak leaf bendwise sinister vert.


This conflicts with Badye (Papworth 191): Or, a bend azure. There's a single CD for adding the overall leaf, per X.4.c. 09/92

Wolfric Hammerfestning. Device. Azure, a grinding wheel between three axes reversed argent.


No documentation was provided to support a grinding wheel as a period charge, or indeed as a period artifact. As this submission would be the defining instance of the charge in SCA heraldry, such documentation is necessary. 01/93

Wulf Thorunsson. Device. Per fess gules and sable, a fess between two morningstars in saltire and a death's head argent.


This conflicts with the arms of von Radwitz (Siebmacher, plate 88): Per fess gules and sable, a fess argent. There's one CD for adding the secondaries. If he resubmits with a fess, please instruct the submitter to draw the fess wider. 05/93

Wulfhere Nordwulf. Household name for Haus von den Nordwulfs.


No forms for the submission were included. Without forms, it must be returned.


The household name would be better as either Haus von den Nordwülfen or Haus der Nordwülfe. You might pass that on to the submitter. 03/93

Wulfstan Egweald. Device. Sable, two wolves combattant, tails nowed, and on a point pointed Or a tower sable.


The wolves are not drawn in a recognizable heraldic manner. In particular, they seem to be drawn with lions' tails, and a suggestion of manes; but the snouts, and the cant, would make them wolves. Such confusion is contrary to the purpose of heraldry. Please have the gentle resubmit with identifiably drawn wolves. 12/92

Yamamoshi no Yoshi. Name.


The submission included no documentation for Yamamoshi as a surname -- only as a compound Japanese noun. O'Neill's Japanese Names doesn't mention it as a name. Pending documentation, this must be returned.


The submitter should be told, when he resubmits, that the particle no is normally omitted from formal Japanese names. 10/92

Yamamoto Yashinobu. Name.


This name had been pended from March 93 meeting, to give the Midrealm College a chance to document the Japanese given name Yashinobu. No documentation has been forthcoming, and it doesn't seem to have been formed from themes found in O'Neill's Japanese Names; it must therefore be returned. 7/93

Ymatir, Canton of. Name.


The name has several problems, each enough for return. First, the construction is not grammatical; according to Lady Harpy, the correct modern grammar would be y tir yma, and the correct medieval grammar would be y tir hwn. Second, the intended meaning, "the canton of this place here" makes no sense, any more than "the shire of that field over there" would. Third, it conflicts with the Kingdom of An Tir, with only the addition of a modifier; the designator (Kingdom, Canton) and article (An, Y) are worth no difference. 10/93

Yo-nan Bori Uigurli. Device. Quarterly sable and azure, a wolf's head couped and a bordure argent.


This conflicts with Joseph Bain (Lyon Ordinary I, #3463): Azure, a wolf's head erased within a bordure argent. There's a single CD, for the field. 05/93

Ysabeau de Saint Wanderielle. Badge. (fieldless) A crescent per pale Or and sable.


This conflicts with the mon of Okudaira (Hawley 70), Dark, a crescent light; and with the tinctureless badge of James IV of Scotland (Fox-Davies' Heraldic Badges, p.118), A crescent. In each case there's a single CD, for tincturelessness; the per-pale division of Ysabeau's crescent is part of the tincture, and is not counted twice. She needs another difference unrelated to tincture. 8/93

Ysabell of Snowshill. Device. Gules, a winged unicorn passant, a chief argent.


This conflicts with Misterton (Papworth 985): Gules, a unicorn passant argent armed Or goutty of the first, a chief argent. There is a CD for the wings on the monster; but Papworth's blazon suggests that the unicorn's horn, not the entire unicorn, is goutty. (This might simply mean that the unicorn's horn is embrued with blood.) Whatever, we cannot grant a second CD for the gouts without some indication that they were significant charges. 09/92

Ysmay de Chaldon. Device. Vert, a compass star elongated to base Or between flaunches erminois.


This conflicts with the device of Esme ffoulkes of Mercia (SCA), Vert, a comet palewise Or between flaunches ermine. There's a CD for the tincture of the flaunches, but nothing for comet vs. mullet elongated to base. She might consider another field tincture. 9/93

Yusuf Ja'bar al-Timbuktuwwi. Badge resubmission. (fieldless) A elephant's head issuant from sinister Or holding with its trunk a sword gules.


On a fieldless badge, charges cannot issue from the edge of the field; there is no field. This must be returned, per Rule VIII.5. 10/92

Yvon Bater of Darkwood. Device change. Per chevron purpure and gules, in pale a rainbow proper emitting lightning flashes and a tower, a bordure embattled argent.


Lord Crescent's assertion notwithstanding, there are indeed lightning flashes in this submission. The fact that they are worth no heraldic difference does not mean they aren't there. Modern comic-book lightning flashes (so-called "shazams") have been disallowed for a decade.


The device is also excessively complex, with four types of charge and five tinctures. (The rainbow's tinctures are counted individually; it could have been solidly tinctured, after all. If that means rainbows proper can only be used in very simple designs, so be it.) We suggest an extensive redesign. 08/92

Yvonne des Saintes Maries de la Mer. Device. Argent, a butterfly and a gore azure.


Conflicts with Constance von Messer (SCA), reblazoned elsewhere in this LoAR: Argent, a butterfly azure, marked proper. There's a single CD, for the addition of the gore. 10/92

Zacharia of Westlake. Device. Vert, a wall between in chief two crossbows and in base two swords in saltire argent.


A wall is defined to be a fess embattled and masoned; and as with all charges of stonework, the masoning is an artistic detail worth no difference. Siebmacher gives several examples of related families using either a fess embattled or a wall, where the only difference was masoned diapering. We might grant the addition of masoning as worth a CD, for any charge except a stonework edifice. This therefore conflicts with the device of Jamie MacLeod (SCA): Vert, a fess embattled between three cups argent. There is only a single CD, for the changes to the secondaries. 08/92

Zillah de Barcelona. Device. Per pale sable and argent, a mullet inverted between three roundels in chief one and two counterchanged, a chief indented purpure.


The indentations on the chief are too small to be identified at any distance. Medieval indented lines were drawn with big, bold points. The non-standard placement of the roundels was also cause for concern; there seemed no simple way to blazon them with complete accuracy, which suggests a non-period design. You might urge the client to consider a more standard placement of the roundels, when she resubmits. 08/92




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