PRECEDENTS OF THE S.C.A. COLLEGE OF ARMS

VOLUME II - The Early Years
Covering the tenures of Master Harold Breakstone, the first Laurel King of Arms, who held office from the early years of the Society until November 1972, and Master Ioseph of Locksley, his successor, who resigned in August 1975.
Compiled and edited by Baldwin of Erebor
Second Edition June XIX (1984)
HTML markup and minor emendations by Maggie Griggs
Several pages combined into one by Lindorm

Contents [A] [B] [C] [D] [E] [F] [G] [H] [I] [J] [K] [L] [M] [N] [O] [P] [Q] [R] [S] [T] [U] [V] [W]


A Disclaimer and Preface, an Introduction and a Reference List are available.

Table of Contents


INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND EDITION

BACKGROUND

In November of 1976, Karina of the Far West published a 26-page booklet of heraldic precedents of the SCA College of Arms. The document was a collection of excerpts from Laurel letters, ordinaries, minutes, and other such sources, organized into categories. Mistress Karina's intention was to use this body of material, together with the comments of her predecessors in the Laurel office, as the basis for a codification of the rules of SCA heraldry. This project, unfortunately, never reached fruition.

In June of 1980, I published two companion volumes to Mistress Karina's collection of precedents. These collections were drawn from the Laurel letters of acceptance and rejection, and covered the tenure of Karina of the Far West and the first year of the tenure of Wilhelm von Schlüssel.

Volume one of the Laurel Precedents was compiled in haste. As Mistress Karina said in her cover letter, "It is incomplete, sketchily cross-indexed, and occasionally mis-alphabetized; let me know what else is wrong with it." Some of the quotations were also inaccurate, and others were attributed incorrectly.

My own volumes didn't fare much better. I allowed myself too much liberty in editing quotations, over-categorized the quotations I selected, and sometimes failed to include enough of the original context for the quotations to make sense. I also missed several letters from Mistress Karina's tenure; and the subsequent flow of rulings from the Laurel office has rendered my volume on Master Wilhelm's tenure almost obsolete.

The second edition of Precedents of the SCA College of Arms is an attempt to correct many of the flaws of the first edition. The present volume has been recompiled from the original sources, in hopes of producing a document that is both accurate and useful.

ABOUT PRECEDENTS

A precedent is an action or decision "that may be used as an example in dealing with subsequent similar cases." The Laurel Precedents documents are founded on the philosophy that heraldic decisions should, whenever possible, be based on previous decisions. Every decision should, of course, be made on the basis of the best information available at the time; but once a specific practice has been adopted or rejected, the precedent set thereby should not be lightly disregarded.

Knowledge of SCA heraldry can be derived from four sources: (1) the Rules for Heraldic Submissions, (2) policy statements made in the Laurel correspondence, (3) explicit comments made on submissions that have been processed, and (4) the submissions themselves.

The Rules for Heraldic Submissions have the advantage of being explicit, but they cannot be comprehensive; one still needs to know how the rules are to be applied. Policy statements are often more directly applicable than the rules, but they, too, require substantiation. Comments made on submissions provide immediate examples, but the reader may have difficulty determining the general principle from a single instance, particularly when the comments are sparse or inaccurate. The submissions themselves are the most accurate gauge of what has been approved, but they are not readily accessible, and they cannot explain why a specific action was taken, particularly in the case of a rejection.

The Laurel Precedents documents are drawn from the second and third of these sources. They are made up of quotations from the formal correspondence of the Laurel Sovereign of Arms. They are a codification, in the words of the persons who made the decisions, of what has been called the "case law" of the SCA College of Arms. The Precedents do not replace the Laurel letters as a source of information, but they can make that information more accessible, by presenting those portions of the Laurel letters that seem best to explain SCA heraldic policy, selected, categorized, and edited.

SELECTION

The quotations in the Laurel Precedents documents were chosen because I felt they (1) conveyed SCA policy, (2) clarified obscure points, (3) demonstrated the use of terms, or (4) expressed the attitude of the Laurel Sovereign who made them. If two quotations said approximately the same thing, I generally chose the one that said it better; if they were of equal merit, I usually chose the earlier one; but if they differed in nuance, or contradicted each other, I tried to include both of them.

CATEGORIZATION

In categorizing the quotations, I have laid a great deal of emphasis on relevance. In general, a quotation appears under a subject heading only if it is relevant to that topic. Omnibus categories (such as BIRD) tend to include quotations that apply to the category as a whole. Rulings applying to a single element of a general category (such as OWL) appear under the heading of that element only. This differs from my policy with the first edition, which was to include a quotation under both the general and the specific subject headings.

I have identified several topics, which I have termed issues, under which I have attempted to assemble enough quotes to constitute a general discussion of the topic at hand. ARTISTIC LICENSE, for example, attempts to show what freedoms (and limitations) we have given the herald painter; DIFFERENCE is made up of expositions on points of difference; and SHIELDS ON SHIELDS contains various rulings on apparent augmentations, inescutcheons, and arms of pretense.

EDITING

The editorial standards for the second edition are higher than they were for the first. My goals in editing the quotations in the second edition have been accuracy and clarity. The idea has been to convey the text of each quotation as accurately and completely as possible, while noting or correcting obvious errors, and omitting material that is not relevant to the general sense of the quotation.

Each paragraph in the Laurel Precedents represents a separate quotation. The implied speaker is the person whose letter is being quoted. In the handful of cases where Laurel has quoted someone else directly, I have enclosed the quote in double quotation marks and given the name or initials of the speaker, in square brackets, at the end of the quotation.

Omissions from the beginning and end of a quotation have been done silently. Anything left out of the middle has been marked with an ellipsis ("..."). Errors involving hyphenation or running together of words have generally been corrected without comment. Most other emendations have been enclosed in [square brackets].

Editorial changes have been made for the following reasons:

  1. To provide additional context for a quotation.

  2. To correct simple errors in typography, spelling, grammar, and word usage.

  3. To replace specific terms with generic ones. When the name of a charge or tincture was not pertinent to the current topic, I usually replaced it with [charge] or [tincture]. This was done to make the general sense of the quotation clearer.

  4. To guard the identity of the person whose submission was being discussed. When the name of the person was not relevant to the topic, I generally replaced all or part of the person's name with one of the letters N. or M.

In addition, I have annotated a number of the quotations, to clarify obscure points or refute inaccurate or misleading statements. In each case, the comments follow the citation and are enclosed in square brackets.

No effort has been made to standardize the spelling of words appearing in the Laurel quotations. American and British spellings were freely mixed in the originals, and you may find several different spellings of any given heraldic term (cotise, for example). so long as I could find a citation for a given spelling, I used it.

Because the machine on which these documents were prepared does not recognize French accents, I have had to adopt non-accented spellings for some of the heraldic terms. I have usually used the English -y form, if one could be found. Contourné has thus become contourny, semé and semée have both become semy, vêtu has been represented by vetu, and so forth.

CITATIONS

Each quotation is identified in the document by the initials of the person being quoted, the date of the source document, the entry number of the document in the reference list, and the page number on which the quotation occurs. For example,

refers to a quotation by Karina of the Far West occurring on page one of document number 31, which (as can be determined from the reference list) was the West Kingdom minutes of 16 July 1972.

REFERENCES

Spelling was checked using the UNIX program spell. I also consulted the following references in the course of editing this volume:

The American Heritage Dictionary. Houghton Mifflin, second college edition 1982.

Donald Attwater. A Dictionary of Saints. Penguin Books, 1965.

J. P. Brooke-Little. An Heraldic Alphabet. Arco Publishing Company, revised edition 1975.

The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Two volumes. Oxford University Press, 1971.

Rodney Dennys. The Heraldic Imagination. Clarkson N. Potter, 1975.

Charles Norton Elvin. A Dictionary of Heraldry. Heraldry Today, 1969.

Julian Franklyn and John Tanner. An Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Heraldry. Pergamon Press, 1970. The New Columbia Encyclopedia. Columbia University Press, 1975.

Oxford American Dictionary. Avon Books, 1980.

James Parker. A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry. Charles E. Tuttle, 1970.

George Cameron Stone. A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Armor in All Countries and in All Times, Together with Some Closely Related Subjects. Jack Brussel, 1961.

Mary-Claire van Leunen. A Handbook for Scholars. Alfred A. Knopf, 1979.

Webster's New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged. G. & C. Merriam Company, second edition 1960.

John Woodward and George Burnett. A Treatise on Heraldry, British and Foreign, with English and French Glossaries. Charles E. Tuttle, 1969.


DISCLAIMER

This is not a publication of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc., or of the S.C.A. College of Arms, and does not delineate official policy. It is an independent compilation made for scholastic purposes.

The first edition of this volume was compiled by Karina of the Far West, and published in October 1976 as Precedents from Laurel's Letters of Acceptance, Ordinaries, Minutes, References, and Other Sources.

Second edition, June XIX (1984).





PREFACE TO VOLUME ONE

"Let it be noted that the difference between heraldry in the Old Middle Ages and in the Current Middle Ages is that the heralds of old enjoyed inventing elaborate wording to mystify the populace, but we don't care to. They, be it noted, were trying to attain job security. We are trying to avoid working so hard."
Randall of Hightower

"A slow sort of country!" said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that."
Lewis Carroll

Volume one of Precedents of the SCA College of Arms deals with the tenures of Master Harold Breakstone, the first Laurel King of Arms, who held office from the early years of the Society until November 1972, and Master Ioseph of Locksley, his successor, who resigned in August 1975.

Harold Breakstone was originally Lord Herald of the Kingdom of the West; Randall of Hightower and Karina of the Far West were both pursuivants. The National College of Heralds was formed in 1968, to serve as a Society-wide heraldic registry. Harold Breakstone became King of Arms of the Society, and Randall of Hightower became Lord Herald of the West. By January of 1970, they had adopted the titles Laurel and Clarion for their offices, and Karina of the Far West had become Banner. At this time, the business of the National College of Heralds was conducted as part of the West Kingdom meetings.

In March of 1971, at the behest of the Board of Directors, the West Kingdom and National colleges were formally separated. Laurel King of Arms became head of the newly-formed College of Arms. A few months later, Clarion was made a King of Arms (deputy to Laurel), and Karina of the Far West became principal herald of the West -- first with the title Banner, then Sequoia, and finally as Vesper, which office she held until she succeeded Ioseph of Locksley as Laurel in 1975.

When Mistress Karina compiled the first edition of this document, she drew material from the correspondence of the West Kingdom College of Heralds (much of it her own) and from articles in Tournaments Illuminated, as well from the correspondence of the Laurel office. I have used these same sources in preparing the second edition -- partly out of a sense of responsibility to the first edition, but chiefly to provide access to the material and insight into the opinions of the people who were responsible for defining SCA heraldry. I have attempted to follow up on all of the post-NCoH West Kingdom comments, noting or omitting those from which the Laurel ruling differed.

Some of the quotations in this volume (particularly those drawn from the West Kingdom minutes) refer by name or by title to people whom the reader may have difficulty identifying: Sarkanyi Gero (Banner, Seraphim), Frederick of Holland (Greencloak), Alfgar the Sententious (Brigantia), and Ioseph of Locksley (Aten). Johanna von Griffenhurst served as artist for the College of Arms, and Boncueur acted as clerk. There are also a couple of references to Stefan de Lorraine, who was West Kingdom Seneschal at the time.

As I worked my way back through the material that comprises this volume, I found myself becoming more and more conservative in my editorial practices. Volumes II and III in this series contain numerous unremarked corrections, usually of spelling and typography. Virtually all of the changes I made to the present text were bracketed as such. If this has made the quotations more difficult to read, I apologize; given the inaccessibility of some of the sources, I thought it better to err on the side of explicitness.

The irreverent footnotes require some explanation. The original irreverent footnotes were a feature of the West Kingdom minutes. Instead of recording editorial asides in the body of the minutes, as is commonly done today, the privy clerk used actual numbered footnotes. The footnotes themselves were printed on a separate page, and were not included in copies of the minutes that were sent to non-heralds.

Most of the irreverent footnotes have been omitted from this volume. In the few cases where I have thought it desirable to include a footnote as part of a quotation, I have set the text off with the words "irreverent footnote," enclosed the whole in square brackets, and inserted it at the appropriate point in the quotation. None of the comments so marked are my own. I have also carried over a number of editorial notes from the first edition; these have been marked, wherever feasible, with Karina's initials.

I'd like to thank a number of people who helped me with Precedents I. Master Wilhelm von Schlüssel ransacked the Laurel files for source material, much of which I could not otherwise have obtained. Duke Siegfried von Höflichkeit supplied me with copies of numerous back issues of Tournaments Illuminated. Baron Hrorek Halfdane of Faulconwood and Mistress Aelfwynn Gyrthesdohtor (assisted by Lord Garin de Gramercy) read the manuscript in draft and offered myriad comments, many of which found their way, in one form or another, into the footnotes. Without their help, I would never have finished this project.

Baldwin of Erebor


A NATURELLE

[Semy of stars a naturelle.l Creative heraldry: "A NATURELLE" [sic] means simply that the stars are not mullets nor estoiles, but are drawn in varying ways, as real stars look. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 1) [This is a misnomer. The French idiom au naturel uses the definite article, and is masculine in gender. In French blazon, it means proper.]

ABATEMENT

The Lord Seraphim is requested to do research on abatements of honour, or rebatements; that is, additions to be made to a knight's arms to show diminution of honour, short of striking them altogether: in other words, how to put a blot on an escutcheon. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 4)

Lord Seraphim has done his research on abatements of honour, and we will file it against need. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 8)

In the fanciful system of "rebatements" evolved by decadent heralds later than our period, a gore was a rebatement for cowardice. However, in this system, the rebatements were always of the stains, particularly tenne. Neither stains nor abatements have so far been allowed to intrude upon the purity of Society heraldry, so the gore sinister in this case is simply another pretty kind of partition or the field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3) [The gore is a charge, not a partition of the field.]

ABBREVIATION

His Majesty has an idea: he wants people with Awards and Grants of Arms [to] be able to put initials indicating as much after their names, and commands us to devise some. We suggest either A.A. and G.A., or preferably Arm. A. and Arm. G. [Irreverent footnote: Actually, we prefer neither one and think it's a terrible idea, but we will announce these and that should satisfy him. It isn't as if anyone is going to use them.] (KFW, 15 Jul 73 [42], p. 3)

ACHIEVEMENT

By the rules of the College and the Society no one is entitled to use anything above his (or her) arms until he has earned the privilege by doing something deemed meritorious by the Society or the Crown. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 12)

We do not, at the present time, use crests, mottoes, or supporters on the scrolls or in the Great Book of Arms. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 14)

AESCULAPIUS

N. wants something which is rather too much like Aesculapi[u]s. We'll write her a letter. Perhaps she could have a sword twined with enchanter's nightshade? (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 3) [The Rod of Aesculapius (the Latin name of Asklepios, Greek god of medicine) has a serpent entwined about it. It is a symbol of the medical profession, and as such is a reserved charge.]

ALCHEMICAL SIGN

I disapprove of introducing hieroglyphics, alchemists' signs, and talismanic figures into heraldry. I think it would be fun to develo[p] canting arms based on hieroglyphics -- provided the [charges] were arranged harmoniously and drawn heraldically ... But to lift symbolic objects straight out of Egypt, drawing style and all, is going too far. (KFW, 31 Jan 72 [23], pp. 1-2)

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

ANNULO

Eight things in annulo are at the cardinal points of the compass. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 2)

APPEAL

Rejected devices may be appealed to the Laurel King of Arms by any member of the Imperial College. This must be done within 60 days of the initial rejection, however, and good, solid documentation had better be forthcoming! (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2)

ARMED

Remember that a bird is never "armed," even if it is a bird of prey; if its beak is of a different tincture from its body it is "beaked" of that tincture; if its legs, including the feet and claws, are of a different tincture, it is "membered" of that tincture. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

ARMS

All person[s] of Knight or Equivalent rank, or superior rank, are requested to confer with the Herald and his advisors on the matter of registering arms. These will be Society arms, and should not be the same as your real arms for the same reasons you do not fight under your real arms or your real name. (JvG, May 1968 [1], p. 4)

His lady, if she wishes, may bear his arms on her left breast in the shape of a losenge -- a diamond-shaped patch. But it would be more proper for her to bear his crest -- which is a completely different thing. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 12)

Lord Clarion stated that N. has labored diligently these eighteen months, and deserves reward. It has been policy not to give arms to anyone under the age of sixteen (Her present Majesty notwithstanding), and N. is not yet eleven, but we shall still recommend he be given arms, and any mother requesting the same for her child shall be advised to put it to work to earn its arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 3) [Queen Astrid was then 15. KFW]

The original purpose of arms was to distinguish warriors on the field and in the lists. This same purpose is the main point to consider in choosing arms. For this reason, the College uses as a model Englis[h] heraldry of the period 1300 to 1450. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 8)

A baron who has organized a barony should have arms. The King may also give arms to other baronial officers, but this is not automatic. Neither is the other. Anyone feeling he has earned arms should petition for same via the local herald. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 5)

We would do well to make a policy statement about badges: that they are displayed neither on shields nor on lozenges, but on roundels. And that a wife or daughter wears her lord's arms on a lozenge, but any other household lady wears them on a roundel, as a badge. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 3) [Oh, really?]

Someone has appeared on the field bearing another's arms. This is being dealt with. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 6)

N. wishes to alter his arms to [blazon]. Since apparently he has not been awarded any scroll of arms, we have no objection. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

She wanted the Masonic symbols on her arms in memory of her father, who was an umpteenth degree Mason, but she still can't; she also couldn't use her father's own arms, assuming he had them. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 1)

see also DEVICE

ARRONDI

[Gyronny of three arrondi, gules, Or, and purpure.] Alternative blazons for this pinwheel-like field division are "Tierced in gyrons arrondi" and "Tierced in gyron gyronnant." We believe the first one given is the clearest and most descriptive, for someone who has acquired the basic heraldic vocabulary. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

ARROW

Since long, narrow objects usually found upright are by convention emblazoned in that position unless otherwise specified in the blazon, and by convention with the business end (point of a sword, for instance) up, it is unnecessary to say "a mace erect." An exception to this rule is the arrow, which is usually shown with the head down. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

By heraldic convention an arrow or arrowhead, unlike most other pointed weapons, is conventionally shown point down; i.e. as if falling to its target. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 2)

An arrow, or an arrowhead's, default position is point down. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 5)

ARTISTIC LICENSE

The [charge] is couped along an arc, which the authorities appear to subsume under ordinary couping. Let the heraldic artist follow what is required on the emblazon. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 1)

Any artist worth his flake white will fimbriate the [gold charge where it passes] over the argent. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 1) [This "fimbriation" appears to have been simple artistic delineation. It was not included in either the submitted or the final blazon.]

How he draws the charge is of no concern to Us. It's not a thunderbird anyway ... at least, that's what the Heard Museum says, and they should know. (IoL, 1 Nov 73 [72], p. 1)

ASTROLOGICAL SIGN

With the exception of the cross, religious, magical and astrological symbols were never used during the period we have taken as our model. [During the Middle Ages, of course, ladies and gentlemen of the Jewish persuasion (Thank you, Moses Mendelsohn) were never given arms; for that reason the Seal of Solomon or the Star of David may be used in Society arms as a charge -- Randall of Hightower.] (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], pp. 9-10)

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

AUGMENTATION

Resembles an ensign of Hungary with an augmentation of honour. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 1) [The submission was rejected.]

Then came a petition from Stefan de Lorraine, Seneschal of the Kingdom of the West, saying that Headless House had done many good services to the Kingdom, and that he, the Lord Laurel, and the Crown Prince wished to give them an award, perhaps crediting the throne of the Kingdom of the West with a household badge to be awarded to deserving groups: perhaps a green crown on a gold field or the reverse. Lady Karina suggested that he give them a charter to call themselves the Royal Headless House [irreverent footnote: and not to pay fees if it does register them], but on the suggestion of the Lord Laurel, the Lord Clarion approved that an augmentation of their banner and badge be given, perhaps a canton of the arms of the Kingdom to be given in combination with a scroll of appreciation. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 8)

What N. desired was nothing more nor less than an addition to his former arms [blazon] of a double tressure axy-counteraxy, the inner sable, the outer gules ... Now, N. is highly interested in things Scottish, and it is easy to see whence he got this tressure. For a double tressure fleury-counterfleury was part of the Royal Arms of Scotland and was occasionally given to earls or higher, by the King, for an augmentation of honour. We have no augmentations as yet except the canton of the royal arms counterchanged which was given to Headless House. And in any case, how can he give himself an augmentation? We could try to convince the Baron to give him an augmentation, but imprimis he isn't ready for it and secundus it is not our business to convince the baron to do anything ... The other alternative is to reserve tressures, either altogether or as possible augmentations in the future. Therefore we referred the entire matter to the Imperial College of Arms. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 3) [Who reserved tressures altogether. KFW]

It is common in Europe to put suggestions of the royal arms on the arms of noblemen, especially those in service to the crown ... but unlike our counterparts in the original Middle Ages, we are interested in showing not relationships but individualities. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 4)

Bordures, chiefs, and augmentations are exempt from the laws of tincture. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that bordures and chiefs are subject to the rule of tincture.]

BADGE

The emblem of a bear statant was registered to Sir Caradoc ap Cador ... The emblem of a grape-leaf and tendril was registered to Sir Bela of Eastmarch. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2) [Both badges were registered without field or tincture.]

The rule as it now stands is that a person may register a badge, which may then be worn by his household; but the household itself may not register a badge lest the household disintegrate and the proper use of the badge be in doubt. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

Personal badges to appear on a ROUNDEL. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [13], p. 2)

We would do well to make a policy statement about badges: that they are displayed neither on shields nor on lozenges, but on roundels. And that a wife or daughter wears her lord's arms on a lozenge, but any other household lady wears them on a roundel, as a badge. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 3) [Oh, really?]

[Sable, a snowflake argent.] This is non-heraldic, which is what she wanted ... we approve it as a non-heraldic badge. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

Badges don't need to conform to the rule of tincture. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that badges must obey the rule of tincture.]

It [the badge] consisted of the Chinese characters for [translation], and the Lady Sequoia flatly disapproved it. Hal von Ravn has a badge with the letters MX, but Lady Sequoia can read it, and she cannot read Chinese characters. A badge, it was noted, serves to mark retainers or other properties. The Lord Banner noted that he would approve it for a Chinese or Japanese house or persona. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 2)

BADGE registered to himself (he may not register it to the name of his household, because names of households are NOT the concern of the College of Arms and are not to be registered, at least at this time). (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1)

He is worried about badges. We must tell him they aren't heraldic. We don't require fields on badges; we just don't forbid them. Consider the badges of Ravnsgaard (MX) and Eastmarch (a vine leaf and tendril), neither of which have tinctures specified, let alone fields. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], pp. 3-4)

see also DEVICE

BARREL

The conventional position of a cask, unless otherwise specified, is fesswise, i.e. on its side. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 2)

Barrels are hooped, not banded. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 1)

BARRULY

It is felt that the field barruly (which the S.P. [Seraphim Pursuivant] describes as "barruletty") is too complicated. Could the number of barrulets be reduced somewhat? (BdM, 3 Jan 71 [11], p. 1)

BARRY

Barry is conventionally of six, as are paly, bendy, and the like, unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

BASE

A base is the lower third or fourth of the shield with a straight division. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 2)

BASS CORNETTO

A serpent, or bass cornetto, is post-1485 but so are many charges that have been passed. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [28], p. 1)

[A Serpent (bass cornetto) azure pierced sable.] The Serpent here referred to, and for that reason capitalized (as opposed to a simple "serpent," snake), is the musical instrument. When the blazon is recited orally the alternative "bass cornetto" may be preferred, unless some clever herald comes up with a way of indicating majuscules in his voice. "Pierced" here, of course, refers to the finger-holes running up the side of the instrument. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

BASTARDY

[A border of bastardy, compony argent and gules.] If N. wishes to call himself a bastard, we shall not dispute it. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1)

BAT

Bats are usually shown displayed, so one specifies which wing is closed, rather than which is open. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 2)

BEAKED

Remember that a bird is never "armed," even if it is a bird of prey; if its beak is of a different tincture from its body it is "beaked" of that tincture; if its legs, including the feet and claws, are of a different tincture, it is "membered" of that tincture. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

BEAR

[Brown bears proper.] We must have the Latin name of Bears that are only coloured brown. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

We have a precedent for the usage of the "Brown Bear proper" in SCA heraldry already. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2) [I.e., genus and species were not required.]

BENDY

Barry is conventionally of six, as are paly, bendy, and the like, unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

BILLET

[Vert, three billets argent winged Or.] The billets are palewise and 2+1 by default. Billets fesswise were suggested, but it transpires that fesswise they are not billets but humets, which would destroy the canting arms. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

BIRD

Remember that a bird is never "armed," even if it is a bird of prey; if its beak is of a different tincture from its body it is "beaked" of that tincture; if its legs, including the feet and claws, are of a different tincture, it is "membered" of that tincture. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

see also MIGRANT

BLAZON

Note that a charge is put in operating position unless otherwise specified. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 7)

The estoiles are of eight points, but we'll leave that out of the blazon because you pre-empt more if you say less. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

Note that as part of the rule of showing objects in the position in which they are used, weapons are shown point in chief, unless otherwise specified, as "inverted." (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

The Ensign is the naval flag, unless otherwise specified. To say "Naval ensign" is as much a tautology as to say "chain mail," and is as much to be avoided. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2) [What about scale mail? KFW]

The Imperial College of Arms has dropped the former distinction it used to make between "counterchanged," "countercharged," and "countercolored," as being unnecessary hair-splitting. It now uses the single term "counterchanged" in all cases, relying upon the structure of the remainder of the blazon to assure clarity. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3) [According to Franklyn and Tanner, the term countercharged is an error.]

[Per pale Or and sable, counterchanged by a chevron inverted gules.] This could be said more clumsily as: Per pale and chevron inverted Or and sable, a chevron inverted gules. We prefer the simplicity of the first blazon, from which we can extrapolate the general case of a field party counterchanged by an ordinary or subordinary running in a direction different from that of the original line of partition of a field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], pp. 4-5)

[Gyronny of three arrondi, gules, Or, and purpure.] Alternative blazons for this pinwheel-like field division are "Tierced in gyrons arrondi" and "Tierced in gyron gyronnant." We believe the first one given is the clearest and most descriptive, for someone who has acquired the basic heraldic vocabulary. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

[Three copihues pendent in pale and in chappe] Upon the advice of Master Ioseph the Rhymer, Lord Aten Herald, this blazon was substituted for the proposed "... pendent as in a fan." The Lord Laurel finds it equally clear and more in keeping with traditional heraldic phrasing. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1) [The usage is questionable. Chape is an adjective describing a treatment of the field, not a noun referring to a location. One can no more say in chape than in ermined.]

[An eagle perched on a rod.] We don't need to say the rod is fesswise. No eagle in his right mind would perch on anything in any other positions. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4)

Society custom is to avoid phrases like "of the first," "of the second," "of the field," "of the last," which make the reader or hearer think back and figure out what came where. We prefer to repeat the name of the tincture where necessary. (KFW, 14 Feb 72 [25], p. 1)

We probably don't need to spell it out for all you intelligent heralds, but the College of Arms has always made it a policy to err on the side of redundancy, rather than insufficiency, of information. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 3)

BOAR

A boar has two tusks and a wart hog four tusks going up and down. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2)

BORDURE

[A border of bastardy, compony argent and gules.l If N. wishes to call himself a bastard, we shall not dispute it. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1)

Bordures, chiefs, and augmentations are exempt from the laws of tincture. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that bordures and chiefs are subject to the rule of tincture.]

BOREAS

[Boreas affronty.l This is the conventionalized rendering of the Wind, as found on maps and such. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 1)

BROWNIE POINTS

Rated a BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE and awarded ten Brownie points. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2) [The awarding of hypothetical brownie points was a common way of applauding a submission. Particularly bad examples were sometimes assigned negative numbers of brownie points.]

Two brownie points for ingenuity. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 2)

Snide comment: the device is potentially very simple and beautiful. It's putting the purple and the black right next to each other that caused us to subtract brownie points instead of adding them. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

BUSINESS END

Note that a charge is put in operating position unless otherwise specified. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 7)

Note that as part of the rule of showing objects in the position in which they are used, weapons are shown point in chief, unless otherwise specified, as "inverted." (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

[Kraken inverted.] By "inverted" does he mean tentacles in chief or in base? The tentacles, being the business end of the kraken, would in normal position be in chief, and a kraken inverted would be tentacles in base. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

A "swepe" is a trebuchet. By convention, objects are drawn with their "business end" to dexter; thus, the swepe is seen from the side as if aiming a missile at a target offstage dexter. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

Since long, narrow objects usually found upright are by convention emblazoned in that position unless otherwise specified in the blazon, and by convention with the business end (point of a sword, for instance) up, it is unnecessary to say "a mace erect." An exception to this rule is the arrow, which is usually shown with the head down. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

BUSY

see COMPLEXITY

BUTTERFLY

The default position for a butterfly is seen with the body palewise, wings spread out flat to either side, fully extended. This is sometimes called "volant en arriere." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

CADENCY

Parents may register arms for their children, but it is understood that when the child reaches the age when he can decide for himself he may change them. No child will inherit arms or titles from his parents; he must earn them. Children, like other belongings, are easily identified if they wear their parents' arms. In the case of children, as distinguished from campstools and t[o]urney chests, marks of cadenc[y] can be used. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 10)

The Society doesn't use Scottish cadency, only English, and seldom at that. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2)

The label is because he hopes to get his father into the Society. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 1)

The octofoil is theoretically the cadency mark for the eighth son, but there are no examples. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 1)

CALAMUS

According to our sources, "pen" means only a quill-pen, not a reed-pen (calamus). (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 2)

CAMELLIA

Please note the difference between a red camellia proper, which is drawn realistically, and a camellia gules, which is stylized. (IoL, 30 Jun 75 [81], p. 3)

CAMEO

[Double cameo bust.] 1) we are not sure that cameos are in period. 2) we feel that the cameo would be difficult to distinguish from a distance. Use a single head, please ... or prove that cameos are in period. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 2) [The submission was later approved.]

CANTING

A dondril was not known to Medieval Europe, but we have too few canting arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 4)

[Vert, three billets argent winged Or.] The billets are palewise and 2+1 by default. Billets fesswise were suggested, but it transpires that fesswise they are not billets but humets, which would destroy the canting arms. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

Seraphim wanted a draconopterygian leonine gargoyle, but even for the pun we can't call that a gargoyle. Gargoyle is from gurgle, they're glorified rainspouts that let the runoff out through their mouths and keep it off the eavesdrip, and the critters on Notre Dame aren't gargoyles, they're grotesques. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 4) [The pun was an attempted cant on the given name Garryl.]

CAP OF MAINTENANCE

It was decided to reserve the use of the cap of maintenance to the corporate arms of the Board of Directors and other Society and Kingdom bodies (the various Colleges and Offices, &c.). (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 1)

Regarding caps of maintenance, the Board has nothing to say as regards making and wearing them. Heraldically, on the other hand, they are reserved. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

It has been suggested that caps of maintenance replace helms on arms in the Great Book of Arms for great lords of state and members of the Board of Directors. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 3)

CASK

The conventional position of a cask, unless otherwise specified, is fesswise, i.e. on its side. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 2)

Barrels are hooped, not banded. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 1)

CAT

The term s'elona[e]ant denotes a Cat in the act of stretching, while standing on its feet, as opposed to their habit of stretching while lying on their back good work! (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 1)

We must have the specific breed of Siamese Cat, that is, is it seal point, blue point, or what? (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [68], p. 1)

CHANGE OF DEVICE

N. wishes to change her device to [blazon]. We shall approve it, and note that her old device is back in public domain. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2) [In this case, public domain is being used to indicate that the old coat is now vacant (i.e., the design is up for grabs).]

N. wishes to alter his arms to [blazon]. Since apparently he has not been awarded any scroll of arms, we have no objection. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

CHAPE

[Three copihues pendent in pale and in chappe.] Upon the advice of Master Ioseph the Rhymer, Lord Aten Herald, this blazon was substituted for the proposed "... pendent as in a fan." The Lord Laurel finds it equally clear and more in keeping with traditional heraldic phrasing. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1) [The usage is questionable. Chapé is an adjective describing a treatment of the field, not a noun referring to a location. One can no more say in chape than in ermined.]

CHAPLET

Queens in the Society use Wreaths of Roses. Princesses use Chaplets. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 4)

Chapl[e]ts are reserved for the Arms of Princesses. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

CHECKY

Checky per saltire has right angles, whereas lozengy lozenges are like two equilateral triangles base to base. (KFW, 15 Jul 73 [42], p. 1)

CHESS KNIGHT

A chess knight, of course, by heraldic convention has two heads set back-to-back on an ornamental base. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3)

CHEST

Though we know exactly what you mean by "treasure chest," it is not a heraldic term; "chest" or "coffer" would be better. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 6)

CHIEF

Bordures, chiefs, and augmentations are exempt from the laws of tincture. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that bordures and chiefs are subject to the rule of tincture.]

CHRYSANTHEMUM

N. can't have [an] Imperial Japanese chrysanthemum, not even with 15 petals instead of whatever number they usually have (16?). (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 1)

CLARICORD

see CLARION

CLARION

The clarion as defined by the Imperial College is that curious shape sometimes otherwise known as claricord, sufflue, organ-rest, &c, and having nothing to do with a "clarion-trumpet," a kind of brass wind-instrument resembling a trombone. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1)

CLAYBEG

see CLAYMORE

CLAYMORE

A Claymore is the two-handed greatsword with drooping quill[o]ns terminated in three or four rings. This term was used until the advent of the Claybeg (what this person terms a claymore) in the 17th Century. The claybeg is more properly called the Scots version of the Venetian Schiavona. (See Stone's Glossary.) If this person is going to go Scots, maybe a little more research is in order. We suggest that the Claybeg be replaced with a weapon more in period with the College. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

CLYMANT

"Forcene" is rearing furiously, said of a horse, but as Brigantia points out unicorns are goats, so it should be not forcene but clymant. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 4) [The final blazon was forceny.]

COBRA

Cobras always have hoods spread. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

COFFER

Though we know exactly what you mean by "treasure chest," it is not a heraldic term; "chest" or "coffer" would be better. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 6)

COLLAR

[Jeweled collar proper.] "Proper" means gold with assorted colored jewels on it. Jewelry is gold by default, even on or. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [The collar was registered as gules, but this may have been an error.]

COLLECTED

[Spider extended.] It is noted that a spider may be extended, or collected, or perhaps a spider rampant, displayed, couchant and statant. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1) [Extended and collected appear to describe the disposition of the spider's legs.]

COLUMN

Corinthian columns are late, decadent heraldry. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 3)

COMMON PROPERTY

see PUBLIC DOMAIN

COMPASS ROSE

N., since he cannot call his charge a compass rose, would rather call it a sun than a roundel. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 7)

COMPLEXITY

Keep your arms simple, in the manner of the Thirteenth or Fourteenth Centuries. That makes them easy to recognize on the field. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 13)

N. wishes too complex a device. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 2)

It is felt that the field barruly (which the S.P. [Seraphim Pursuivant] describes as "barruletty") is too complicated. Could the number of barrulets be reduced somewhat? (BdM, 3 Jan 71 [11], p. 1)

N. wants all manner of confused charges on a gyronny of thirty-two. A gyronny of more than sixteen looks like nothing more than a modern dart board. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5)

N. wants too many charges. We suggest he limit it to [blazon], because while a lady can get away with messy arms a gentleman may find himself on the field, and must be recognizable. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5)

Although this device does not conflict with anything currently registered in the files, it is objectionable on aesthetic grounds, being too visually cluttered and not easy to distinguish at a distance. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 3)

This one really approaches the limit of busyness that the College of Arms is prepared to tolerate. Because it is so complicated visually, it is (a) harder for an artist to emblazon, and (b) harder for an observer to recognize at a distance. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 3)

We have an answer from N., who wanted ... everything in the catalog. We suggested he devise something with one or two items. He has replied that he doesn't want to simplify it at all. (Obviously one of these misguided people want their device to represent their entire life history.) (KFW, 15 Oct 72 [34], p. 1)

Too damn complex. Could you see it ... all of it ... with just one glance, while it's painted on a shield held about 100 yds. away? I doubt it. (IoL, 1 Mar 73 [62], p. 1)

It is considered gauche to place your entire life history on your coat. (IoL, 1 Aug 73 [69], p. 1)

The following are rejected as too complex. These persons are advised to redesign ... but if they won't, then We will consider the devices again. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

COMPONY

[A border of bastardy, compony argent and gules.] If N. wishes to call himself a bastard, we shall not dispute it. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1)

CONFLICT

It was reaffirmed that one must not copy the arms of genuine persons or corporations, nor of fictional characters. [Irreverent footnote: of which Lord Clarion's character Lord Darcy appears to be in violation; but in truth Lord Darcy bears those arms by Lord Clarion's express permission.] (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], p. 2) [The office of Clarion Herald was held at this time by Randall Garrett (Randall of Hightower), whose SCA arms are the same as those of his fictional detective, Lord Darcy.]

The College will not knowingly allow any one to register real arms, arms that appear in fictional works or trademarks of the past or present eras. This is plag[i]arism, and besides they are covered by copyright laws. Therefore, you may not register in the Great Book as John Carter of Barsoom or Volk[s]wagon of Mercedes-Benz, nor may you register the Red Eye of Mordor or the silver star of the Guards of the Tower as your own arms. We expect you to be a creative anachronist, so let's not steal other peoples ideas. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 11)

Arms and crest copied from the Scotch family of Welch. Plagiarism. Sent letter #2 [rejection for stated reason] suggesting he redesign from the ground up. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2)

N. wants Gules, a saltire argent, which is Neville. We suggest a saltire or. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5) [In the early days of SCA heraldry, conflict checking appears to have been dependent upon the heralds' personal knowledge -- Papworth had not yet been discovered. The current example is a case in point; present at the meeting at which this recommendation was made were Breakstone (Laurel), Sarkanyi (Seraphim), Hightower (Clarion), Far West (Banner), and numerous others.]

The blazon is reminiscent of Bilbo's river journey, but what of that; it's no more of a Tolkien reference than several we have already. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

[Alianora of the Tall Grasses.] The conjunction of the name and the device of a swan is too reminiscent of Alianora the Swan May, a character in Poul Anderson's book Three Hearts and Three Lions. By the rules of the Society, no person may use arms, names or titles taken from works of fiction. At the Suggestion of the Lady Banner Herald, the Lord Clarion recommends that this person write to the author of Three Hearts and Three Lions, asking his specific permission if she desires to use this name in conjunction with the swan device. If there is some compelling reason in her mind for the association of these two -- that is, if it is not simply a whim or groundless desire -- the Lord Clarion would like to know of it. (For instance, if the person's 20th century name is Ellen Swanson, an obvious association of ideas would be involved.) (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 3)

Both name and device are directly out of the works of Philip Jose Farmer and we wish to inquire if N. has permission from the Maker of Universes. This is not allowable. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 5)

We note that this is a totem sign of the Iroquois, but since they were not in the classical definition a civilized people we have no objections. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 6)

This College registers Arms, Devices and Badges. In the realm of what we are responsible for registering, we will not let a person use mundane realities. In principle we to not otherwise try to regulate or pay any att[en]tion to mundane realities, with the exception of mundane Arms, that exception being that we [do not] allow one in the Society to register mundane arms as Society arms. But as for badges and tartans of the real world, they are not our business. We shall neither register them, nor ban them, nor recognize them, in any way. (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 7)

Then was raised the question of the device of N. [blazon]. This had been found at a previous meeting to have been borne in the past by [mundane family]. Question: was this family still extant? M. having provided sufficient evidence in writing to this College that it was now extinct, the College approved the submission for N., and cleared it for transmission to the Lord Clarion. (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 7)

This is the device of the President-General of the Assassins' Guild, Second Level Akor-Neb, in the Verkan Vall time-travel series [by H. Beam Piper]. If he wants to infringe on the arms of the President-General of the Assassins' Guild, that is his lookout, but let him do it on some other time line than ours. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 4)

N. of this Kingdom toes not feel threatened by the existence of another [principal charge] 3500 miles away, particularly when the [charge] is of a different colour upon a background of metal. We hope that M. does not feel threatened in any way by N.'s [charge]. It appears that these two people have, independently, borne these devices for about the same length of time. Given the situation with which we are acquainted, of poor or non-existent communication between the East and the Imperial College of Arms, the College of the West does not feel inclined either to insist that M. abandon his device, or to acknowledge that N. need abandon his. If M. and you, my lord, feel the same way, we believe that there is room enough in the Known World to accommodate both [charges] amicably. (KFW, 14 Feb 72 [25], p. 1)

Lady Karina (as Lion Queen-of-Arms for Aquilonia in the Hyborian Legion) very much wants not to have any conflict between Society and Hyborian heraldry, particularly since she has a company of Brythunian archers somewhere all ready to join. The Lord Laurel desires to have written arguments for and against this practice in two weeks. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2)

This is in direct conflict with a coat from [kingdom] that, due to administrative foulups of a couple of years ago, was never registered. We are ironing out the problem now, but if his device passes the College, then this one will have to be changed. If his is rejected, then this one will have to be, on the same grounds. Redesign. (IoL, 1 Mar 73 [62], p. 1)

see also DIFFERENCE, PERMISSION

CONSTELLATION

We have turned down constellations before and are prepared to do so again. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 1)

CONTOURNY

Lord Seraphim said that contourne means rampant to sinister, rather than simply facing sinister, but we do not seem to do it that way and he was overruled. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 7) [Woodward and Parker both state that contourny describes an animal turned toward the sinister side of the shield; Brooke-Little implies that the term may also be applied to inanimate charges. It should be noted that a lion contourny will in fact be rampant to the sinister, since in the absence of other information, a lion is assumed to be rampant. This may have been the source of Seraphim's error.]

CONTRAST

Objects placed on the field as charges can be "proper." "Proper" is the true color of the object. This can be used as long as it is recognizable against the field. A raven proper on a field sable would not be allowed, but a raven proper on a field gules is allowable. When something is called "proper" only one distinctive color should come to mind; a raven proper is obviously black, but what color is a horse proper? (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 9)

Or on ermine is not going to be very easily visible across the field, but this is his problem; we don't even know if he fights. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 1)

[Quarterly or and argent.] He will be expected to emblazon it with a nice dark yellow [O]r so that it can be told from the argent. (KFW, 12 Feb 73 [38], p. 1)

COPIHUE

Copihues, otherwise Chilean bellflowers (Lapaxeria rosea), look something like clove-buds. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 1)

CORONET

see CROWN

CORPORATE ARMS

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 3)

see also OFFICE

COUNTER-ERMINE

The Imperial College of Arms now uses the term "Counter-ermine" in lieu of "Ermines, " since the latter can be too easily confused with "Ermine" and "Erminois." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

COUNTERCHANGE

The rule of countercharging: no one is allowed to register the counter charge of arms that have already been registered. For example, if someone has already registered Argent, a cross sable, no one would be able to register Sable, a cross argent. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], pp. 10-11)

This is a counterchange of the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre. Does the Lord N. wish to bear this, since we commonly use counterchange for differencing? (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 4)

This is a counterchange of N. without the [charge], for which he enclosed a letter of permission. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 4)

One's counterchanges are one's own to dispose of. (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 1)

COUNTERCHANGED

We have been using "counterchanged" to mean one charge divided and countercolored ... and "countercharged" to mean two charges on opposite sides of a division line and countercolored. We will instead henceforth use "counterchanged" for both. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 4)

The Imperial College of Arms has dropped the former distinction it used to make between "counterchanged," "countercharged," and "countercolored," as being unnecessary hair-splitting. It now uses the single term "counterchanged" in all cases, relying upon the structure of the remainder of the blazon to assure clarity. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3) [According to Franklyn and Tanner, the term countercharged is an error.]

[Per pale Or and sable, counterchanged by a chevron inverted gules.] This could be said more clumsily as: Per pale and chevron inverted Or and sable, a chevron inverted gules. We prefer the simplicity of the first blazon, from which we can extrapolate the general case of a field party counterchanged by an ordinary or subordinary running in a direction different from that of the original line of partition of a field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], pp. 4-5)

COUNTERCHARGED

see COUNTERCHANGED

COUNTERCOLORED

see COUNTERCHANGED

COUPED

The [charge] is couped along an arc, which the authorities appear to subsume under ordinary couping. Let the heraldic artist follow what is required on the emblazon. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 1)

CREATIVE HERALDRY

Migrant signifies volant as seen from above; that's creative heraldry for you. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1) [Creative heraldry denotes terminology or practices coined by SCA heralds.]

[Sable, three stalks of wheat as in a garb, Or.] This is creative heraldry. The centre stalk is palewise; the two remaining follow roughly what would be the outlines of a pair of flaunches. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

"Cojoined in estoile" = like spokes of a wheel, or radii of a circle. Creative blazonry ... (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 2)

[Sable, a sun eclipsed Or.] That is, all that can be seen is the corona. This won't conflict with any of the others, and we thought we'd used them up. Such creativity is to be encouraged. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 3) [This is the SCA definition. According to Parker, the mundane sun eclipsed is one that is tinctured sable.]

CREST

His lady, if she wishes, may bear his arms on her left breast in the shape of a losenge -- a diamond-shaped patch. But it would be more proper for her to bear his crest - which is a completely different thing. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 12)

We do not, at the present time, use crests, mottoes, or supporters on the scrolls or in the Great Book of Arms. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 14)

CROSS

Lord Clarion noted that questions have been asked about crosses; that there is no restriction of shape of a cross, but that a papal cross or an arch[i]episcopal cross should be born[e] only by a Pope or Archbishop, and there are by definition none in the Society, where all are laymen (as previously established in the case of Bp. N.). (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

An unmodified cross is throughout by default. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 2)

[Cross potent rebated in annulo.] In plain terms, he wanted an ancient Indo-European sun disk, or fylfot, sometimes known as a swastika, a rounded version thereof. And there was great debate on all sides. It boiled down to this: nobody objected to the sun disk, and everybody objected to the word swastika, and so the blazon was carefully reworded. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4) [The submission was approved.]

A starcross, also called a millrind, looks like an asterisk; it is automatically couped. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 2) [According to Alfgar the Sententious, who handled this submission, the SCA starcross is "a figure consisting of a pale couped conjoined with a saltire couped, like an asterisk, or a straight mill-rind." The usage appears to be unique to SCA heraldry.]

A Celtic Cross is of similar shape to the Latin Cross, and is not, unless specified, thr[ou]ghout. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 7)

The Lord Banner vouches for the Coptic cross, which looks like a Zuni sun disc with single instead of triple rays, the vertical rays longer than the horizontal ones. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 1)

[Cross quadrate by estoile.] A cross quadrate normally has a square placed across the junction; in this case a[n] estoile of four points has been placed that a point appears at each right angle of the cross. (KFW, 11 Apr 73 [40], p. 1) [This appears to be a misnomer. Quadrate means "having four sides and four angles square or rectangular." An estoile of four points cannot be quadrate.]

[Celtic cross simple.] The Celtic Cross is, by definition, similar to the Latin Cross in shape. This Celtic Cross has the arms of equal leng[th], as the simple Cross, and is thus described as a Cross simple. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 3)

A Cross of Cleves is a Latin Cross fleury. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

CROWN

N. wishes a crown which he ... may not have. Let him be told that crowns and coronets are reserved for kingdoms. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 3)

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 3)

What's wrong with lions wearing crowns? said Lord Banner. Look at Uppsala, whose lion has a winged helm and crown yet. Yes, said Lady Vesper, but we didn't pass it. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 5) [The submission was registered without the crown.]

She would like to have lots of crowns, circlets, et caetera, all to be standardized to show one's exact rank. Aside from the fact that no one could afford them, they aren't medieval. Those elegant things you see the Lords wearing at coronations - which they don't own, but rent from D'Oyly Carte -- are much later. And we don't even a little bit need sumptuary laws. (KFW, 12 Feb 73 [38], p. 4)

CULLIONED

The English have a word for it too! Replace "vil[e]ne" with pizzled and cullioned. (IoL, 9 Mar 73 [63], p. 1) [Vilene ("having the virile parts of a specified tincture") is a term from French blazon. I have located a couple of references to pizzled, but cullioned appears to be a neologism; Brooke-Little gives the English term as coded.]

CUT-OFF DATE

see PERIOD

DACHSHUND

The period colour of the dachshund was similar to the modern "red" coloured animal. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [59], p. 4)

DAGGER

It is not necessary to say "palewise hilt in base"; that is normal position for a dagger. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 4)

It is unnecessary to say "a dagger erect gules" since the default position for a dagger is erect. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

DAISY

N. is said to have wanted daisies and been told to have octofoils. Lady Vesper says daisies are perfectly medieval, if heraldically rare, and she could have had them if she'd asked her. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 1)

DANCETTY

N.'s proposed device raised the question of the exact definition of "dancetty." According to S.P. [Seraphim Pursuivant] this term applies only to a line of partition per fess, the said line forming only three peaks. However we have found other sources that admit it as a line of partition in other directions. S.P. suggests retaining the line dancetty per fess with the partition line per pale being a simple vertical. (BdM, 3 Jan 71 [11], p. 1) [This is the modern definition. The medieval dancetty was not a line of partition, but a treatment of a two-sided ordinary.]

Dancetty is by convention of three points. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

DETAIL

The estoiles are of eight points, but we'll leave that out of the blazon because you pre-empt more if you say less. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

The convention for a lion is that it is armed, langued and orbed gules unless either it or the field is of that tincture, in which case it is armed langued and orbed azure. Should a different case, as here, prevail, it is necessary to specify the tinctures. If no tincture is specified, the default tinctures are assumed. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

It's orbed gules, but we won't put that in the blazon. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4)

She also specified armed argent and langued gules, but those are default colors. Said the Lord Seraphim, How about the lining of his ears? Et responsum est ab omnibus: Don't give her ideas. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 5)

[Screech owl proper.] The Lord Banner doesn't care to differentiate species heraldically. But considering we differentiate the rest of the arms, we needn't cavil at giving people the species they want. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 2)

DEVICE

The difference between "arms" and "a device" is that any member of the Society may have a device, whereas only members of the Nobility may bear arms ... Once a man has been knighted (or attained the rank of Master, or become a member of the Order of the Laurel), his "device" comes under the regulation of the College of Arms. A "device" may or may not conform to the rules of heraldry; if you are not a member of the Nobility, then you have complete freedom of choice in your "device" -- but ... when you become ennobled, you will be granted arms by His Majesty, the King, and your arms must conform to heraldic rules. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 11)

It was reaffirmed that a device need not be heraldically correct, but that people who register non-heraldic devices should be warned that they will have to change them if they receive awards of arms. (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], p. 2)

This can be registered as a device; if she discards the magical symbol ["the symbol of Saturn"] it can also be arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 3)

A non-heraldic device was approved for Hal von Ravn ... being the letters M and X, the latter with a bar above it, or the Roman numerals for nine thousand. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 2)

The Artisans Guild submitted a design for a badge to be registered by the College. The Lord Laurel dictated a letter in reply, stating that, as the College had been given to understand that the Guild is not a part of the Society, the proposed device was not subject to the jurisdiction of the College. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2)

In addition, Ioseph wrote: "When you register a device from Atenveldt, PLEASE DO NOT REGISTER IT IF IT IS NOT SUITABLE FOR ARMS, unless specified on the form that this will not be used for arms." ... He had explained to Boncueur on the farspeaker that he is trying to inaugurate a policy in Atenveldt that devices as well as arms must be heraldically correct, & desires the College's cooperation in enforcing this policy ... It was declared that this is and has consistently been the College's position; that few exceptions are granted, save occasionally for ladies who (a) indicate they will not attempt to do anything for which they might be rewarded with arms and (b) to not appear upon the fighting field. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 4)

see also ARMS, BADGE

DIFFERENCE

The problem was discussed of how closely two sets of arms may resemble one another without causing confusion on the field; and whether such items as color may be used for differencing. As for example, John of Griffin, with vert, a griffin rampant contourny or, and Alfonso be Castile, or, a griffin rampant sable. Now in theory these arms are perfectly acceptable. But will they lead to confusion on the field? Moreover, if the College authorizes both arms, it eliminates the use both of reversing and of color changes as means of differencing. And note that the Board of Directors bears the Society's arms with colors reversed: vert, a laurel wreath or ... Lady Banner suggested that a minimum difference of fifty per centum of the terms of the blazoning be the criterion ... Lord Greencloak suggested that the arms be accepted, since both color and position were different ... and so it was deemed, subject to regula pollicis, that similar arms are acceptable if there is a difference in two of the three: color, charge, and position. (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], pp. 2-3)

[The rule of three.] This rule states that two-thirds of the parts of the arms submitted must be different from any other set of registered arms. The three parts of the arms are: 1. the color of the field, 2. the main charge and its position, 3. the color of the charge. For example, if someone wanted to register Argent, a lion rampant sable, and there was already registered Argent, a lion rampant gules, it would not be allowed because the color of the field and the position of the lion are the same. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 11)

The arms are acceptable. Ioseph of Locksley notes that they are like Prince Valiant, but Henrik of Havn's arms are similar to both, yet we consider all three allowable because of differences in secondary charges and in tincture. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 6)

We must make a distinction between the two-of-three difference necessary for arms in the Society, and the one-of-three difference between Society arms and arms from the outside world. We can't insist that Society arms be that different from mundane arms, because mundane arms aren't that different from each other. But we have to be able to distinguish our devices from one another across the field. (KFW, 15 Jul 73 [42], pp. 2-3)

We ask for the date of adoption of the so-called "Rule of One." We find it a good idea, but point out that it remains Our option to decide if a device is "too close." (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 6)

see also CONFLICT, PERMISSION

DISMEMBERED

[Sea-serpent ondoyant-emergent.] Ondoyant-emergent is a term coined by the College of Heralds of the West to represent a sea-serpent or other creature drawn as below: [picture] and not to be confused with the same creature dismembered: [picture]. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1) [In the letter of intent of 25 Oct 71, the body of the serpent is described as "emerging from the water at intervals in a wave-like fashion, alternate parts of the body presumed to be underwater."]

DISPLAYED

A pair of wings of any kind is by convention displayed unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

Bats are usually shown displayed, so one specifies which wing is closed, rather than which is open. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 2)

DOCUMENTATION

We had thought his [charge] to be out of period, but he has documentation to support it. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 9)

He supplies documentation (a document by a Franciscan friar born 1305, translated in the National Geographic of October 1917 under the title "Heroic Flags of the Middle Ages") for Solomon's-seals on medieval arms and flags. So much for our argument that they were not used. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], pp. 1-2)

We asked the Lord Laurel, informally, if he planned to accept it, and he answered, unofficially, Are you kidding? Only on presentation of adequate proof, 96 at least. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 7)

If you are attem[p]ting to register an unusual heraldic design, and by that I mean something not commonly used or found in Society Heraldry, then I must ask you to state your source in the letter of intent. (IoL, 19 Dec 72 [57], p. 1)

Rejected devices may be appealed to the Laurel King of Arms by any member of the Imperial College. This must be done within 60 days of the initial rejection, however, and good, solid documentation had better be forthcoming! (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2)

Please cite a precedent for the use of tartan in heraldic Arms. Otherwise, alter the damn thing to better heraldry. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

DONDRIL

A dondril was not known to Medieval Europe, but we have too few canting arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 4)

DRAGON'S EYE

The dragon's eye as here drawn is a Germanic symbol. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], Pi. 3)

DRAWING

see ARTISTIC LICENSE

ECLIPSED

A Sun eclipsed is, by convention, sable. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 8) [This is the mundane definition of a sun eclipsed.]

[Sable, a sun eclipsed Or.] That is, all that can be seen is the corona. This won't conflict with any of the others, and we thought we'd used them up. Such creativity is to be encouraged. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 3) [This is the SCA definition. According to Parker, the mundane sun eclipsed is one that is tinctured sable.]

EMBATTLED

Our authorities describe the phrase "battled-counterembattled grady" as "fanciful." We will give him ... undy embattled Grady. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 1)

ENCHANCEMENT

see AUGMENTATION

ENFIELD

The Enfield, to the best of the Lord Laurel's information is out of period. (IoL, 31 Mar 75 [79], p. 3)

ENFLAMED

[Sword enflamed radiant from the blade.] The spelling is because Lord Clarion says that inflamed and infected are too close in the human mind. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 10)

ENGLISH HERALDRY

The original purpose of arms was to distinguish warriors on the field and in the lists. This same purpose is the main point to consider in choosing arms. For this reason, the College uses as a model Englis[h] Heraldry of the period 1300 to 1450. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 8)

ENGUICHE

[Horn argent lipped gules.] This College proposes "lipped" to replace the [F]rench engu[i]che to describe the mouth of a horn. (KFW, 27 Jul 73 [43], p. 2)

ENSIGN

The Ensign is the naval flag, unless otherwise specified. To say "Naval ensign" is as much a tautology as to say "chain mail," and is as much to be avoided. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2) [What about scale mail? KFW]

ERECT

Since long, narrow objects usually found upright are by convention emblazoned in that position unless otherwise specified in the blazon, and by convention with the business end (point of a sword, for instance) up, it is unnecessary to say "a mace erect." An exception to this rule is the arrow, which is usually shown with the head down. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

ERMINE

No, N., you may not have erminit[e]s (ermine but with a red stripe on each side of [the] central tail). (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 2)

The Lord Laurel said that (1) pean was not a fur allowed by the College; (2) N. could have no exceptions. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 4) [The term pean was said to be out of period, although one could apparently have a field sable, ermined Or.]

If (as has been indicated) the Board of Directors has reserved ermines to itself, the Lord Laurel has not heard of it. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

The Imperial College of Arms now uses the term "Counter-ermine" in lieu of "Ermines," since the latter can be too easily confused with "Ermine" and "Erminois." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

Or on ermine is not going to be very easily visible across the field, but this is his problem; we don't even know if he fights. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 1)

ERMINES

see ERMINE

ERMINITES

see ERMINE

ESCUTCHEON

Any Society member may design a device to fit upon whichever shape shall be found most pleasing and satisfactory to him or her alone, and may bear his or her device indifferently upon a lozenge or upon an escutcheon; and scribes, calligraphers, and heraldic artists may in the preparation of scrolls or other documents of State, follow the individual preference of the Society member in question, or, in the absence of any preference expressed by the member, may follow their own inclinations at the bidding of their artistic conscience. (HB, 24 Jun 72 [52], p. 1)

see also SHIELDS ON SHIELDS

ESTOILE

The estoiles are of eight points, but we'll leave that out of the blazon because you pre-empt more if you say less. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

"Cojoined in estoile" = like spokes of a wheel, or radii of a circle. Creative blazonry ... (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 2)

[Semy of stars a naturelle.] Creative heraldry: "A NATURELLE" [sic] means simply that the stars are not mullets nor estoiles, but are drawn in varying ways, as real stars look. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 1) [This is a misnomer. The French idiom au naturel uses the definite article, and is masculine in gender. In French blazon, it means proper.]

EXCEPTION

The Lord Laurel said that (1) pean was not a fur allowed by the College; (2) N. could have no exceptions. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 4) [The term pean was said to be out of period, although one could apparently have a field sable, ermined Or.]

[Leodamas of Thebes.] Since time was short (the man was on his deathbed, and has since died), we expedited the document through the Lord Laurel's office and got it accepted by him; the scroll was done the following day and taken to Calafia in time to be given to Leodamas' family. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 2)

see also GRANDFATHER CLAUSE

EXTENDED

[Spider extended.] It is noted that a spider may be extended, or collected, or perhaps a spider rampant, displayed, couchant and statant. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1) [Extended and collected appear to describe the disposition of the spider's legs.]

[A domestick catt sejant, paw extended.] By convention it is the dexter paw that is extended when none other is specified. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 1)

EYE

The dragon's eye as here drawn is a Germanic symbol. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 3)

[Human eye proper.] Proper tincture is: lashed sable, orbed argent, pupiled azure, outlined gules. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [59], p. 4)

FATIMA

A "hand of Fat[i]ma" is a conventionalized hand-shaped figure with three fingers between two "thumbs." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

FIELD

The emblem of a bear statant was registered to Sir Caradoc ap Cador ... The emblem of a grape-leaf and tendril was registered to Sir Bela of Eastmarch. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2) [Both badges were registered without field or tincture.]

He is worried about badges. We must tell him they aren't heraldic. We don't require fields on badges; we just don't forbid them. Consider the badges of Ravnsgaard (MX) and Eastmarch (a vine leaf and tendril), neither of which have tinctures specified, let alone fields. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], pp. 3-4)

FIMBRIATION

The use of fimbriation is incorrect; it is used to avoid color on color or metal on metal, rather than to introduce it. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

Any artist worth his flake white will fimbriate the [gold charge where it passes] over the argent. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 1) [This "fimbriation" appears to have been simple artistic delineation. It was not included in either the submitted or the final blazon.]

They didn't use fimbriation very much in the Middle Ages, which ... will differentiate us from just about anything. (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 1)

FIRE

[A sword argent, the blade radiant with flames gules.] Lord Clarion steadfastly refuses to approve the flaming sword. In fact, nothing rayed with flames appears in medieval heraldry. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 10)

[Sword enflamed radiant from the blade.] The spelling is because Lord Clarion says that inflamed and infected are too close in the human mint. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 10)

"Fire proper" or "Flames of fire proper" is represented as tongues of flame; if the field is of a metal, the outermos[t] tongues are gules and the inner or; if the field is of a colour, the outer are or, the inner gules. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 3)

"Flames of fire proper" consist, heraldically, of an odd number of tongues rayonny tinctured or and gules. If shown on a colour, the two outermost tongues are or; if on a metal, the two outermost tongues are gules. Within this scheme the tongues then alternate tinctures. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

By the example of Robert Roundpounder, flames can act as insulation against color on color. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

FLAG

The Ensign is the naval flag, unless otherwise specified. To say "Naval ensign" is as much a tautology as to say "chain mail," and is as much to be avoided. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2) [What about scale mail? KFW]

[In the fly.] That's the outside of the flag, as opposed to the hoist, which is the inside. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 5) [With the mast or staff on the viewer's left, "in the fly" thus means "to the sinister."]

FLAMES

see FIRE

FLY

[In the fly.] That's the outside of the flag, as opposed to the hoist, which is the inside. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 5) [With the mast or staff on the viewer's left, "in the fly" thus means "to the sinister."]

FORCENY

"Forcene" is rearing furiously, said of a horse, but as Brigantia points out unicorns are goats, so it should be not forcene but clymant. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 4) [The final blazon was forceny.]

FOUNTAIN

A "fountain," in traditional heraldry, is a roundel barry wavy argent and azure, representing a spring, pond, lake, etc. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [8], p. 4)

FYLFOT

[Cross potent rebated in annulo.] In plain terms, he wanted an ancient Indo-European sun disk, or fylfot, sometimes known as a swastika, a rounded version thereof. And there was great debate on all sides. It boiled town to this: nobody objected to the sun disk, and everybody objected to the word swastika, and so the blazon was carefully reworded. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4) [The submission was approved.]

GARB

[Sable, three stalks of wheat as in a garb, Or.] This is creative heraldry. The centre stalk is palewise; the two remaining follow roughly what would be the outlines of a pair of flaunches. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

GARGOYLE

Seraphim wanted a draconopterygian leonine gargoyle, but even for the pun we can't call that a gargoyle. Gargoyle is from gurgle, they're glorified rainspouts that let the runoff out through their mouths and keep it off the eavesdrip, and the critters on Notre Dame aren't gargoyles, they're grotesques. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 4) [The pun was an attempted cant on the given name Garryl.]

GEM

[Brilliant cut emerald.] We are not certain whether jewels were faceted then, but do not consider it that vital. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 5)

[Jeweled collar proper.] "Proper" means gold with assorted colored jewels on it. Jewelry is gold by default, even on or. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [The collar was registered as gules, but this may have been an error.]

If you to not know what a brilliant-cut emerald looks like from above, ask your local jeweller. [HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 3)

GENUS AND SPECIES

[Brown bears proper.] We must have the Latin name of Bears that are only coloured brown. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

We have a precedent for the usage of the "Brown Bear proper" in SCA heraldry already. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2) [I.e., genus and species were not required.]

GOAT

It was inquired whether female unicorns also have beards, since nanny goats have. Lady Banner indignantly protested that a unicorn is not a nanny goat, but it is. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 7) [According to Franklyn and Tanner, "the unicorn is basically a goat, having cloven hooves and being bearded; further, when in the rampant attitude, the unicorn may be blazoned as clymant." Other sources speak of the unicorn as being small "like a kit." Most of the authorities agree, however, that the body and appearance of the unicorn are those of a horse.]

Although we heartily dislike the use of symbols of black magic on the field or anywhere else, we cannot formally object to the use of a goat's head cabossed. However, if he had placed the goat's head within a pentacle, it would then be restricted; the Templars were accused of using this sign and it was partly for that reason that they were disbanded. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 3)

"Forcene" is rearing furiously, said of a horse, but as Brigantia points out unicorns are goats, so it should be not forcene but clymant. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 4) [The final blazon was forceny.]

GORE

A gore is not a field division but a charge, and this device violates tincture. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 4)

In the fanciful system of "rebatements" evolved by decadent heralds later than our period, a gore was a rebatement for cowardice. However, in this system, the rebatements were always of the stains, particularly tenne. Neither stains nor abatements have so far been allowed to intrude upon the purity of Society heraldry, so the gore sinister in this case is simply another pretty kind of partition of the field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3) [The gore is a charge, not a partition of the field.]

GRANDFATHER CLAUSE

We have said in previous cases that once allowed a device is allowed and there is nothing we can do. Perhaps we need to think about this. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 2)

This falls under the Grandfather Clause. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 2) [The Grandfather Clause appears to have been invoked because the coat, which differed by only one point from mundane arms, had been borne since the earliest days of the Society.]

This badge falls under the Grandfather Clause, and is limited to the exclusive use of N. while reigning as King. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 3)

The new Arms for the Barony of N. have no Laurel Wreath, but as they were passed originally without, then the alteration may stand without them. (IoL, 28 Feb 75 [78], p. la)

GROTESQUE

see GARGOYLE

GRUESOME CHARGES

Is there any rule against skulls and other grewsome charges? Alas, there is not. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 2)

GURGES

The gurges on N.'s Viking ship sail should not be colour-and-colour, but colour-and-metal. Apparently a gurges is not treated like a field party; the present case would be a violation of the rule of tincture. (BdM, 3 Jan 71 [11], p. 1)

GYRON

[Four gyrons gules and argent issuant from dexter chief.] If you are confused by this, imagine it as the 4th quarter of a gyronny of sixteen. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

GYRONNY

N. wants all manner of confused charges on a gyronny of thirty-two. A gyronny of more than sixteen looks like nothing more than a modern dart board. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5)

[Gyronny of three arrondi.] The Harleian manuscript of Henry VI has one and says it is ancient. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 1)

Gyronny is by convention of eight unless otherwise specified. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

[Gyronny of three arrondi, gules, Or, and purpure.] Alternative blazons for this pinwheel-like field division are "Tierced in gyrons arrondi" and "Tierced in gyron gyronnant." We believe the first one given is the clearest and most descriptive, for someone who has acquired the basic heraldic vocabulary. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

HAND

A "hand of Fat[i]ma" is a conventionalized hand-shaped figure with three fingers between two "thumbs." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

The red hand is the symbol of the baronets of Ulster, and he can't have it. (Even though he's a descendant of Ulstermen. Even if he were a descendant of Ulster baronets, he can't have it in the Society, it's an augmentation from the Queen.) (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 2)

HEAD

[Three heads of St. Cybi proper.] What are the attributes of St. Cybi? (Pronounced, N. tells us, Cubby.) Irish tonsure (no hair showing in front), short abbot's mitre, and nimbus. (KFW, 14 Jan 73 [37], p. 3) [The final blazon specified "aureoled Or."]

HERALDS

It was discussed how the different members of the College of Heralds may be distinguished at sight. There is in tradition the rule that only the King-at-Arms may wear fur trim to his cloak. But the College does not care for sumptuary laws, and the Lord Laurel King-at-Arms has no objection, so that rule is now no more ... The Lord Laurel has determined to have made by the Jewelers' Guild certain discs of orichalcum bearing the laurel wreath and the individual titles, viz., Laurel, Clarion, Banner, Greencloak, and Aten. And lesser members of the College shall wear a pin of crossed trumpets ... It was noted that the citizenry of the Society need only look for a green cloak to know they are dealing with a Herald. Moreover, the discs and pins can be worn without the cloaks, to show that one is in the College of Heralds but is off duty. (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], p. 1)

First and foremost, a Herald is neutral. His job is to speak and not to judge. He never signs petitions in the name of his office, he never judges combats, and never the combatants themselves. If asked a question he speaks fact and not opinion. (HB, Spring 1970 [4], p. 15)

It is a false and scurrilous rumor that members of the College are required to make puns at every opportunity. A proper College member does this automatically and needs no encouragement. (HB, Spring 1970 [4], p. 16)

The goal of the College of Heralds is the registration of all members of the Society with arms that are clear, distinctive and pleasing to their owners. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 8)

On this day decisions were made on many arms, the great bulk of which caused the Lord Laurel King-at-Arms to repeat his motto, which is, Semper scriptum capere, or, Always get it in writing. To which the Lady Banner Herald replied that the motto of the King-at-Arms of England is Miserere mei Deus, secundum magnam misericordiam tuam. [Have mercy upon me, O Got, according to Thy great mercy.] And all agreed that it behooved a herald frequently and loudly to call upon the mercy of God. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1)

Turning to business of the National College of Heralds, Lord Clarion Herald suggested a change in title to Great College. And Lady Banner Herald said that we all know it ought to be Imperial College, but we do not have an Empire. But Lord Greencloak Pursuivant said, Sooner or later there will be an Empire; why not start it ourselves? And Lord Laurel King-at-Arms, as head of the National College, told them all that he would consider it himself. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 1)

Let it be noted that the difference between heraldry in the Old Middle Ages and in the Current Middle Ages is that the heralds of old enjoyed inventing elaborate wording to mystify the populace, but we don't care to. They, be it noted, were trying to attain job security. We are trying to avoid working so hard. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 4)

The College of the Kingdom of the West has found itself bogged down by the fact that other Kingdoms are required to submit blazons only, and not emblazons, making it difficult for this College to decide upon the validity of the various devices submitted, which may be and in some cases definitely are misblazoned. We would like to request, therefore, that it be made a rule of the National College of Arms that tricked emblazons be also submitted with the blazons by other Kingdoms of the Empire ... Furthermore, if the files of the College of Arms are to be complete, then we must have the usual drawings and submissions that we have heretofore had. Unless the people from various Kingdoms are on file here, these individuals theoretically do not exist. A simple sheet of paper with a long list of blazons on it is difficult, if not impossible, to file. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 8) [At this time the College of the West and the College of Arms, though officially separate, were housed in the same building and staffed by some of the same people. KFW]

Let me specify that it is now and always has been the policy of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc., and of the College of Arms, that the official language for Society documents, proceedings, ceremonies and communications of any kind whatsoever is English, nor should any other language be used as the principal medium of official Society documents, proceedings, ceremonies or communications. (RoH, 14 Sep 71 [46], p. 2)

There have been small complaints of heralds ignoring the King's wishes and attempting to marshal fights. Master Frederick stated, firstly, that the Heralds are the King's voice and should pay heed to him; secondly, that a Herald by definition has no opinion of fighting. When Master Frederick is asked, as a belted fighter, for his opinion of a fight, he takes off his Pursuivant's tabard in order to give it. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 4)

Kingdom Colleges of Heralds do not have separate arms. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 2)

Letters of notification of registration of Arms or devices with the Imperial College will no longer be sent out by the Imperial College of Arms. It is the responsibility of the Principal Herald of each Kingdom, henceforth, to inform a Society member subject of his Kingdom of the registration of his Arms or Device by the Imperial College, or to cause the member to be informed by some one of his subordinates. Such notification must be made IN WRITING; and a copy of such notification must be kept by the Principal Herald of the Kingdom in his files, such that upon request it or a fa[cs]imile thereof may be produced for the inspection of the Laurel King of Arms, should any question ever arise about the member's having been notified ... Likewise, letters of rejection of Arms or devices by the Imperial College will no longer be sent out by the Imperial College of Arms. The Imperial College will notify the Principal Herald of the Kingdom in writing of the rejection, the reasons therefor, and the suggestions that may be applicable on how the submission may be improved so as to be acceptable to the Imperial College. It is then the responsibility of the Kingdom Herald to notify or cause to be notified IN WRITING the said member, subject to the same provisions as in the foregoing paragraph. (HB, 25 Jun 72 [53], pp. 1-2)

We note that the Imperial Electors [Board of Directors] have ruled that Lady Karina's title may not be Sequoia Herald, since Sequoia was a historical personage. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 2)

Father Ruthven has suggested we have as our motto Honi soit qui mal y puns. We suggest he keep it as his own. We'll keep Scribendum est, or, if the scroll does not exist, then the scroll does not exist. (KFW, 15 Oct 72 [34], p. 1)

All Kingdom Colleges of Heralds use the Arms of the Imperial College of Arms, just as all Earl Marsha[l]s use the Arms of the Imperial Marshalate, and all Seneschals, Mistresses of Arts, Masters of Sciences and Medics use the appropriate Imperial Arms. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

Don't even bother sending in Arms for the [kingdom] College of Heralds. You can't have them, and must use the Arms of the Imperial College. We are, after all, one group. (IoL, 18 Jun 73 [66], p. 2)

Dragon Herald's Office (badge): A mountainside showing a cave mouth with 2 bou[l]ders on each side, issuing two tendrils of smoke, and encircling all a mott[o]: "Ubi draco latet." ["Where the dragon hides."] (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74] p. 2) [Given without tinctures for use as a seal. KFW]

HIEROGLYPHIC

I disapprove of introducing hieroglyphics, alchemists' signs, and talismanic figures into heraldry. I think it would be fun to develo[p] canting arms based on hieroglyphics - provided the [charges] were arranged harmoniously and drawn heraldically ... But to lift symbolic objects straight out of Egypt, drawing style and all, is going too far. (KFW, 31 Jan 72 [23], pp. 1-2)

HILTED

By Society convention, the word "hilted" covers "quill[o]ned" and "pommelled" when all three are of the same tincture. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

HOIST

[In the fly.] That's the outside of the flag, as opposed to the hoist, which is the inside. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 5) [With the mast or staff on the viewer's left, "in the fly" thus means "to the sinister."]

HORN

[Horn argent lipped gules.] This College proposes "lipped" to replace the [F]rench engu[i]che to describe the mouth of a horn. (KFW, 27 Jul 73 [43], p. 2)

HORSE

"Forcene" is rearing furiously, said of a horse, but as Brigantia points out unicorns are goats, so it should be not forcene but clymant. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 4) [The final blazon was forcene.]

HOUSEHOLD

The rule as it now stands is that a person may register a badge, which may then be worn by his household; but the household itself may not register a badge lest the household disintegrate and the proper use of the badge be in doubt. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

BADGE registered to himself (he may not register it to the name of his household, because names of households are NOT the concern of the College of Arms and are not to be registered, at least at this time). (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1)

Until officially informed otherwise, the Lord Laurel must take the position that Clan N. is a household like any other household and the College does not register households. It cannot be registered as a badge to any individual because each King appoints a new Chieftain ... When he [Laurel] has received a letter from the King of [kingdom], stating that Clan N. falls within the category of those organizations that qualify as service organizations, he will register it to the Crown of [kingdom]. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [56], p. 1)

HUMET

[Vert, three billets argent winged Or.] The billets are palewise and 2+1 by default. Billets fesswise were suggested, but it transpires that fesswise they are not billets but humets, which would destroy the canting arms. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

IMPALING

see MARSHALLING

INESCUTCHEON

see SHIELDS ON SHIELDS

INFLAMED

[Sword enflamed radiant from the blade.] The spelling is because Lord Clarion says that inflamed and infected are too close in the human mind. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 10)

INHERITANCE

Parents may register arms for their children, but it is understood that when the child reaches the age when he can decide for himself he may change them. No child will inherit arms or titles from his parents; he must earn them. Children, like other belongings, are easily identified if they wear their parents' arms. In the case of children, as distinguished from campstools and t[o]urney chests, marks of cadenc[y] can be used. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 10)

INVERTED

Note that as part of the rule of showing objects in the position in which they are used, weapons are shown point in chief, unless otherwise specified, as "inverted." (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

[Kraken inverted.] By "inverted" does he mean tentacles in chief or in base? The tentacles, being the business end of the kraken, would in normal position be in chief, and a kraken inverted would be tentacles in base. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

INVOLVED

A serpent "involved" is one rolled into a circle with its tail in its mouth. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2) [The serpent's head is on the sinister side of the shield, facing dexter.]

ISLAM

If he says he is going by Islamic heraldry, we will say that in Islam he could not have a feather as a charge, because it is too close to something alive. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5) [We have not actually checked Islamic heraldry. KFW]

This is a paynim device but is acceptable. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 1) [It should be noted that, although comments were made on several occasions that a device was not in keeping with the religious precepts of the submitter's persona, I can find no record of a submission having been rejected solely on these grounds. In the present case, the submission was approved.]

JACULUS

A Jaculus is a winged, leaping snake. (IoL, 31 Mar 75 [79], p. 1)

JEWELRY

see GEM

JUDAISM

If he is going to be a proper Jew, he must remember that Mosaic law prohibits the portrayal of living creatures or parts thereof (cf. the prohibition in Exodus against graven images). (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 3)

The Lord Banner points out that while the Mogen David was in use in the middle ages, it wasn't then the badge of the Jew. O well. (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 1)

KEY

The Society's convention, the opposite of that in most mundane heraldry, is that the wards of the key, though they are drawn to dexter, are shown downward. This is because the original use of a key, for the Seneschal's office, was so emblazoned in the early days of the Society. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3)

KLEE-STENGELN

N. wishes an eagle holding a kleestangel. Aside from the kleestangel (an item of German heraldry which must be researched), the Lord Laurel must search out to determine whether it is the imperial German eagle. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 3) [According to Franklyn and Tanner, the klee-stengeln is "a development of the eagle's wing-bone used in Germanic heraldry; the wings (displayed) appear to be charged along the upper edge with a barrulet ... issuant of the bird's body, and terminating at the outer end in a trefoil."]

Seraphim Pursuivant agree[d] to accept it without [the] klee-stengel after long discussion thereupon. Clarion: "We don't like it." S.P.: "Ignorant barbarians." (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2)

KNOT

The figure-eight knot will be quite familiar to any sailor. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 17)

KRAKEN

[Kraken inverted.] By "inverted" does he mean tentacles in chief or in base? The tentacles, being the business end of the kraken, would in normal position be in chief, and a kraken inverted would be tentacles in base. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], Pi. 7)

KRUMMHORN

The serpent, or bass cornetto, is a Renaissance musical instrument and hence post-1485, but then so were those krummhorns. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 2)

By convention the bells are in base; they are played in that position. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [55], p. 1)

LABEL

The label is because he hopes to get his father into the Society. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 1)

LANDSCAPE

It's a landscape, but not too blatant a one. (KFW, 13 Feb. 72 [24], p. 2)

LANTHORN

Usually rendered emitting three straight rays on each side. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 2)

LAUREL WREATH

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 3)

N. wants, among other things on vert, a braided roundel or, which looks too much like a baronial laurel wreath. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 2)

Arms of branches of the Society are henceforth required to bear a wreath of Laurel. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

We must have a Laurel wreath (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 1) [The submission was for the arms of a branch.]

The new Arms for the Barony of N. have no Laurel Wreath, but as they were passed originally without, then the alteration may stand without them. (IoL, 28 Feb 75 [78], p. 1)

LEAVED

[A sixfoil slipped and singly leaved.] It was enquired whether the term "slipped" includes one leaf. The Society has used "slipped and leaved" for a stem and two or three leaves; we cannot lose by specifying, since she wants just one leaf in the position shown on the emblazon. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 1) [The charge was registered as a six-foil gules, slipped vert.]

LEOPARD

The College defines "leopard" as a lion passant guardant . Should the spotted cat known in modern times as a leopard be desired as a charge, it will be blazoned as "an African leopard." (Cf. "a tyger" -- "a Bengal tiger.") (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], pp. 4-5)

LETTER

A non-heraldic device was approved for Hal von Ravn ... being the letters M and X, the latter with a bar above it, or the Roman numerals for nine thousand. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 2)

N. wants too many charges, lettering, and a mug overflowing with beer. We will accept the mug, without beer, and no lettering. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 4)

It [the badge] consisted of the Chinese characters for [translation], and the Lady Sequoia flatly disapproved it. Hal von Ravn has a badge with the letters MX, but Lady Sequoia can read it, and she cannot read Chinese characters. A badge, it was noted, serves to mark retainers or other properties. The Lord Banner noted that he would approve it for a Chinese or Japanese house or persona. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 2)

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

see also DEVICE

LIGHTNING FLASH

The lightning-flash ... is not the same thing as the traditional heraldic thunderbolt. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2) [The submission was approved.]

LION

The College defines "leopard" as a lion passant guardant. Should the spotted cat known in modern times as a leopard be desired as a charge, it will be blazoned as "an African leopard." (Cf. "a tyger" -- "a Bengal tiger.") (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], pp. 4-5)

The convention for a lion is that it is armed, langued and orbed gules unless either it or the field is of that tincture, in which case it is armed langued and orbed azure. Should a different case, as here, prevail, it is necessary to specify the tinctures. If no tincture is specified, the default tinctures are assumed. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

Lioncels, "lion cubs," is used for lions in the plural unless separated or fighting, the idea being that lions are too territorial for an adult to allow another adult in his presence, so they must be cubs. (KFW, 19 Sep 72 [33], p. 2)

LIPPED

[Horn argent lipped gules.] This College proposes "lipped" to replace the [F]rench engu[i]che to describe the mouth of a horn. (KFW, 27 Jul 73 [43], p. 2)

LOZENGE

Any Society member may design a device to fit upon whichever shape shall be found most pleasing and satisfactory to him or her alone, and may bear his or her device indifferently upon a lozenge or upon an escutcheon; and scribes, calligraphers, and heraldic artists may in the preparation of scrolls or other documents of State, follow the individual preference of the Society member in question, or, in the absence of any preference expressed by the member, may follow their own inclinations at the bidding of their artistic conscience. (HB, 24 Jun 72 [52], p. 1)

see also SHIELDS ON SHIELDS

LOZENGY

Checky per saltire has right angles, whereas lozengy lozenges are like two equilateral triangles base to base. (KFW, 15 Jul 73 [42], p. 1)

MACE

[Flanged mace.] On this one there had been much discussion of what shape the mace should be; Seraphim having proposed a gaudy ornate thing that looked like a birthday cake on a stick, topped with an elaborate crown. Others argued for a simple mace of war. Seraphim: "But the heraldic mace has always been drawn ... It is a ceremonial mace ..." To him was answered: "We are creative heralds. The Lord Constable's mace in this kingdom is not going to be a ceremonial mace. He is really going to carry it on the field and use it to beat people over the head if they don't obey." It was finally decided that a flanged mace with a couple of extra knobs &c. on it would be fancy enough to sooth Seraphim's heraldic feelings, yet functional en[o]ugh to suit the Lord Constable; and it was so approved. (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 3)

Since long, narrow objects usually found upright are by convention emblazoned in that position unless otherwise specified in the blazon, and by convention with the business end (point of a sword, for instance) up, it is unnecessary to say "a mace erect." An exception to this rule is the arrow, which is usually shown with the head down. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

MAGIC

This can be registered as a device; if she discards the magical symbol ["the symbol of Saturn"] it can also be arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 3)

With the exception of the cross, religious, magical and astrological symbols were never used during the period we have taken as our model. [During the Middle Ages, of course, ladies and gentlemen of the Jewish persuasion (Thank you, Moses Mendelsohn) were never given arms; for that reason the Seal of Solomon or the Star of David may be used in Society arms as a charge - Randall of Hightower.] (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], pp. 9-10)

Although we heartily dislike the use of symbols of black magic on the field or anywhere else, we cannot formally object to the use of a goat's head cabossed. However, if he had placed the goat's head within a pentacle, it would then be restricted; the Templars were accused of using this sign and it was partly for that reason that they were disbanded. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 3)

Ioseph of Locksley objects to the use of pentacles and other magical symbols, and appeals to the Lord Clarion's judgment, and the Lord Clarion finds that these [three pentagrams and a crescent] are indeed magical symbols and that in the Middle Ages anyone appearing on the field with them would have been hanged. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

This is the counterchange of a symbol frequently and publicly used by Anton LeVey. Clarion: "This College does not wish to become involved in any argument between black wizards (RoH, 13 Jun 71 [45], p. 2)

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

MARSHALLING

Let us keep in mind the original purpose of arms: to identify the man on the field. We of the Society have no need or reason to follow the decadent practice of quarterings, sub-quarterings, sub-sub-quarterings, and so forth. We are not, after all, concerned with the genealogical aspects of heraldry; we are concerned with what a man is, not who his ancestors might have been. Therefore, keep your arms simple, in the manner of the Thirteenth or Fourteenth Centuries. That makes them easy to recognize on the field. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 13)

The matter of quartering was discussed. Lord Clarion opposes the use of quartered arms, since they indicate that the bearer has both parents bearing arms in the Society: and this is true as yet of very few. But a plain quartered field is allowed. Thus Ironste[ed] may have quarterly azure and argent. And Verena of Laurelin, who was formerly refused a blazon of quarterly, by quarters, 1 and 4, azure, a crux ansata or, 2 and 3, argent, may have it ... Since 2 and 3 are without charge, the blazon is not two arms quartered. (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], p. 3)

A distinction should be made between "the field quarterly" and "quartered arms." Quarterly divides the field into four parts, the first and fourth being of one tincture and the second and third of another tincture. However, metal cannot be used with metal, color with color or fur with fur ... A charge may be placed in any one quarter ... or one charge may be placed over all four quarters ... provided it is not of a tinc[t]ure used in the quarters. This is an exception to the metal on metal, color on color rule. Quartered arms have the field divided per quarterly [sic] and a different charge in each quarter ... Traditionally, quartered arms imply that you had ancestors who bore arms. Because the Society has not been in existence long enough for any one to have had armigerous ancestors quartering of arms is not allowable. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 10)

Husbands and wives do not impale their arms. This is a later practice not used by the Society. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 14)

He wanted four separate quartered arms, and we don't do that in the Society. (KFW, 19 Sep 72 [33], p. 2)

This is not rejected per se, but rather the following must be pointed out: that it is the policy of the Imperial College to register the individual parts of marshallings rather than the full marshalling itself, tho[ugh] we do wish to be informed of any marshallings in use, to comment &c. Let this Lady and her Lord submit individual applications and emblazons. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [68], p. 1)

These imply inherited Arms too closely for Our liking. Let her take one charge and place it over the whole field, or place it in one quarter, or place both charges in, for example, the 1st quarter. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [68], p. 1) [The arms were quarterly, with one charge in dexter chief and another in sinister base.]

This is much too like an imp[a]led coat. (IoL, 1 Aug 73 [69], p. 1) [The arms consisted of a complex per-fess division, with the base per pale, and different charges in each compartment of the field.]

It is permitted for Lords and Ladies of State, Great only, to display their Arms of Office impaled, to dexter, with their own Arms to sinister. (IoL, 31 May 75 [80], p. 1)

MASONIC SYMBOL

She wanted the Masonic symbols on her arms in memory of her father, who was an umpteenth degree Mason, but she still can't; she also couldn't use her father's own arms, assuming he had them. (KFW, 16 Jul 72 [31], p. 1)

MEMBERED

Remember that a bird is never "armed," even if it is a bird of prey; if its beak is of a different tincture from its body it is "beaked" of that tincture; if its legs, including the feet and claws, are of a different tincture, it is "membered" of that tincture. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

MERMAID

A mermaid is conventionally shown (unless otherwise specified in the blazon) as holding a mirror in one hand, into which she is looking, and a comb in the other, with which she is combing her hair. The term "Mermaid in her vanity" has been adopted to represent this convention. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [8], p. 4)

MIGRANT

Migrant signifies volant as seen from above; that's creative heraldry for you. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1) [Creative heraldry denotes terminology or practices coined by SCA heralds.]

[Goose migrant to dexter.] The descriptive term "migrant" was established to describe the silhouette of a bird seen from below, its head outstretched in front of it and its wings outspread as if flying or soaring. Without other qualification, the bird is presumed to be flying toward the chief; in this case, the bird is flying towards the dexter side (i.e. the axis of the body is fesswise, and the axis of the wings is palewise). (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], pp. 1-2)

In Society usage, "migrant" refers to a bird volant with wings outstretched as seen from directly above; two eyes are visible if the bird is "orbed" of a different tincture. It is a bird's-eye view of a bird, so to speak. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

The term "migrant" denotes a bird in flight as seen from above. This is a Society heraldic convention that has been adopted by the British College ... makes one proud to be a herald. (IoL, 23 May 73 [65], p. 1)

MILLRIND

A starcross, also called a millrind, looks like an asterisks it is automatically couped. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 2) [According to Alfgar the Sententious, who handled this submission, the SCA starcross is "a figure consisting of a pale couped conjoined with a saltire couped, like an asterisk, or a straight mill-rind." The usage appears to be unique to SCA heraldry.]

MOGEN DAVID

The Lord Banner points out that while the Mogen David was in use in the middle ages, it wasn't then the badge of the Jew. O well. (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 1)

MOTTO

We do not, at the present time, use crests, mottoes, or supporters on the scrolls or in the Great Book of Arms. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 14)

MOUNT

[Sable, a mount vert.] This is color on color -- though many mounts have been used without regard to color; a mount proper is ipso facto vert. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 9) [The submission was rejected.]

MOUSE

He wonders whether a mouse can ramp, but we say why not. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 1)

MULLET

By convention a mullet has five points unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

[Semy of stars a naturelle.] Creative heraldry: "A NATURELLE" [sic] means simply that the stars are not mullets nor estoiles, but are drawn in varying ways, as real stars look. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 1) [This is a misnomer. The French idiom au naturel uses the definite article, and is masculine in gender. In French blazon, it means proper.]

NAME

Why can't people put together halfway consistent medieval identities? N. touched me off, but I could cite you several dozen examples almost as bad. Name should agree with surname and ekenames, and arms should be in keeping. I wish more people followed the Scandinavian practice of taking a surname that corresponds to the coat of arms -- most people had patronymics, and when a man was ennobled he took arms and surname together. Thus Hammarskjold has crossed hammers with four roundels, Oxenstjerna a bull's head with a star, and Papegoy -- I'm not kidding " a parrot. (KFW, 31 Jan 72 [23], p. 2)

We don't care for the name but we'll forgive it for the sake of the beautiful arms. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1) [Both name and arms were approved.]

As for this College, we will not accept names without devices, which is not our job. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 4)

NAME - CONFLICT

Nirriti, so called, cannot call himself thus ... Let him be told: Change your name or the Lord of Light will be very unhappy with you. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 2)

One calling himself Stephen of Blois cannot call himself that. He was the King Stephen just before Henry II who fought with Matilda. But the arms are all right ... and will be approved when he chooses a new name. (Roil, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 2)

[Alianora of the Tall Grasses.] The conjunction of the name and the device of a swan is too reminiscent of Alianora the Swan May, a character in Poul Anderson's book Three Hearts and Three Lions. By the rules of the Society, no person may use arms, names or titles taken from works of fiction. At the Suggestion of the Lady Banner Herald, the Lord Clarion recommends that this person write to the author of Three Hearts and Three Lions, asking his specific permission if she desires to use this name in conjunction with the swan device. If there is some compelling reason in her mind for the association of these two -- that is, if it is not simply a whim or groundless desire -- the Lord Clarion would like to know of it. (For instance, if the person's 20th century name is Ellen Swanson, an obvious association of ideas would be involved.) (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [16], p. 3)

Concerning the gentleman calling himself Fourmyle of Ceres ... we have long repeated to him that his device was acceptable but his name was not (it being an ekename used by the protagonist of an extremely well-known work of science fiction). (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 3)

N. has an acceptable device but we wonder about the name; it is the name of a character in Howard's Bran mac Morn. It is the name of a very minor character, it could also be a common Celtic name; and he may not even know about it. We suggest he can modify it if he likes. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 1) [The name was approved.]

He can't be Barbarossa. It's the specific name of a very famous person. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 3) [Actually, Barbarossa is a descriptive surname meaning "red beard." It was borne by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I, and by the Turkish corsair Khair ad-Din and his brother.]

[Ilya.] While we find no problem with the badge, we must ask for more differentiation of the name. Is he I[l]lya Kur[y]akin of a certain television show? Is he Ilya Bodanovitch? Who is he? Add more to the name, please. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [68], p. 1)

[Delores del Rio he la Plata.] So soon we forget. That's much too close to the film actress of the same name. Change it. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

[Azarael the Soul Separator.] I doubt very much that the Islamic Angel of Death has joined the Society. Change it! (IoL, 31 Jul 74 [77], p. 1)

NAME - DOCUMENTATION

Rhiannon N.... wishes to know if her name is all right or if she should go back to being M. No one seems to know; she must prove that the name was used by humans, not gods only, and before the nineteenth century when anything went. The College operates under the Napoleonic code: otherwise we would never get anywhere. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 1)

NAME - FANTASY

[N. Brandybuck.] Name ok, since she isn't saying she's any specific LOTR [Lord of the Rings] Brandybuck. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 1)

NAME - GIVEN

"Swami" is not, to Our knowledge, a proper name. Please try to take a name more in keeping with the purposes of the SCA Inc. (IoL, 31 Jul 74 [77], p. 1)

NAME - HOUSEHOLD

BADGE registered to himself (he may not register it to the name of his household, because names of households are NOT the concern of the College of Arms and are not to be registered, at least at this time). (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1)

We don t register household names. (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 2)

NAME - MADE-UP

N. is coined, and no language at all. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 1) [The name was approved.]

NAME - NON-HUMAN

[Rhiannon.] Let her be told that the arms are acceptable but her name is not only used in myth and fiction, but is a male name; Rhiannon was one of the bards of Wales. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 3)

N. reports that the name Rhiannon is a female name, but a mythological one, belonging to a great and famous lady. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 8)

Rhiannon N.... wishes to know if her name is all right or if she should go back to being M. No one seems to know; she must prove that the name was used by humans, not gods only, and before the nineteenth century when anything went. The College operates under the Napoleonic code: otherwise we would never get anywhere. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 1)

[N. Odinsson.] Let him submit a history form documenting whose son he is, or change his name. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [56], p. 1)

NAME - PATRONYMIC

[N. Odinsson.] Let him submit a history form documenting whose son he is, or change his name. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [56], p. 1)

NAME - PLACE

[N. of Valinor.] The first name is acceptable, but Valinor is the habitation of angels. Let him choose a mortal land. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2)

NAME - ROYAL

N. of Pretense's arms ... are acceptable; his name is not. It sounds like pretender to the throne. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 9)

NAME - SCA BRANCH

The Council of Seneschals has enquired whether baronies, cantons, and the like should choose a name before or after applying to the College of Heralds. It is answered that while they should check arms with a [herald], it is for the Imperium to rule on the choice of names. And they should not submit arms to the College until they have been accredited through the Imperial College of Electors [Board of Directors]. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 1)

NAME - SURNAME

[Ilya.] While We find no problem with the badge, We must ask for more differentiation of the name. Is he I[l]lya Kur[y]akin of a certain television show? Is he Ilya Bodanovitch? Who is he? Add more to the name, please. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [68], p. 1)

NAME - TITLE

['Abbas 'al-Rachid.] The device is acceptable, but the name is not; it means "Father of the Orthodox" and is one of the titles of the Caliph of Baghdad. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 4)

"Nevsky" is a title and may not be used!!! (IoL, 31 Jul 74 [76], p. 7) [This is incorrect. Nevsky (Russian "of the Neva") was a surname earned by Alexander, prince of Novgorod, after his victory over a strong Swedish army at the Battle of Neva in 1240.]

OCTOFOIL

The octofoil is theoretically the cadency mark for the eighth son, but there are no examples. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 1)

N. is said to have wanted daisies and been told to have octofoils. Lady Vesper says daisies are perfectly medieval, if heraldically rare, and she could have had them if she'd asked her. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 1)

OFFENSIVENESS

[Cross potent rebated in annulo.] In plain terms, he wanted an ancient Indo-European sun disk, or fylfot, sometimes known as a swastika, a rounded version thereof. And there was great debate on all sides. It boiled down to this: nobody objected to the sun disk, and everybody objected to the word swastika, and so the blazon was carefully reworded. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4) [The submission was approved.]

Is there any rule against skulls and other grewsome charges? Alas, there is not. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 2)

Tell this ... person ... that we are interested in heraldry. I certainly hope some of the fighting women of your area in [kingdom] have challenged his body about this travesty. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1) [The submission was a woefully-blazoned attempt to represent a naked female torso using heraldic charges.]

OFFICE

The Lord Laurel pointed out that we have a peculiar situation here. The Office of the Mailing List is really an Imperial institution. We have some officers whose offices are corporations. Only a King can give arms, and so we have officers of purely Imperial offices that have been given arms by the King of the West. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

The College does not difference provincial arms. We suggest that like the officers of Atenveldt they wear the arms of the office on one shoulder and the arms of the province on the other. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 1) [The submission was a badge for the officers of the province incorporating "a roundel with the arms of the office."]

All Kingdom Colleges of Heralds use the Arms of the Imperial College of Arms, just as all Earl Marsha[l]s use the Arms of the Imperial Marshalate, and all Seneschals, Mistresses of Arts, Masters of Sciences and Medics use the appropriate Imperial Arms. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

[West Kingdom Chronicler.] If the BoD decides that the Kingdom Chroniclers, Exchequers, &c will all display the appropriate Imperial Arms, then this reverts to a Badge. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 1)

All Corporate Arms, that is, all Arms relating to Offices of the SCA Inc., will henceforth be submitted directly to the Lord Laurel, with no fee, who will write the letter of intent, &c. (IoL, 28 Feb 75 [78], p. la)

It is permitted for Lords and Ladies of State, Great only, to display their Arms of Office impaled, to dexter, with their own Arms to sinister. (IoL, 31 May 75 [80], p. 1)

ONDOYANT-EMERGENT

[Sea-serpent ondoyant-emergent.] Ondoyant-emergent is a term coined by the College of Heralds of the West to represent a sea-serpent or other creature drawn as below: [picture] and not to be confused with the same creature dismembered: [picture]. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1) [In the letter of intent of 25 Oct 71, the body of the serpent is described as "emerging from the water at intervals in a wave-like fashion, alternate parts of the body presumed to be underwater."]

OPINICUS

The Opinicus as a charge is out of period. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 1) [Rodney Dennys, in The Heraldic Imagination, cites occurrences of the opinicus as a supporter in 1556 and 1561. At the time of this ruling, the cut-off date for charges was 1485.]

ORGAN-REST

The clarion as defined by the Imperial College is that curious shape sometimes otherwise known as claricord, sufflue, organ-rest, &c, and having nothing to do with a "clarion-trumpet," a kind of brass wind-instrument resembling a trombone. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1)

OWL

An Owl is, by convention, statant guardant. They are always gardant in any other position, unless otherwise specified. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 8)

[Screech owl proper.] The Lord Banner doesn't care to differentiate species heraldically. But considering we differentiate the rest of the arms, we needn't cavil at giving people the species they want. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 2)

[Owl regardant.] Can owls be other than guardant? Various heraldic authorities say not, but since body forward and head full back is typical of owls, who can turn their heads right around, we will merely say that for the Society full-face is default. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 2)

Owls are, as a rule, guardant, but we can also assume that they can look other directions too. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 1)

PALY

Barry is conventionally of six, as are paly, bendy, and the like, unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

PALY-COUNTERPALY

[Paly of six, or and sable, a fess counterchanged.] This is sometimes called paly-counterpaly. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 1)

PARTED FIELD

Barry is conventionally of six, as are paly, bendy, and the like, unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

[Per pale Or and sable, counterchanged by a chevron inverted gules.] This could be said more clumsily as: Per pale and chevron inverted Or and sable, a chevron inverted gules. We prefer the simplicity of the first blazon, from which we can extrapolate the general case of a field party counterchanged by an ordinary or subordinary running in a direction different from that of the original line of partition of a field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], pp. 4-5)

PASSION-NAIL

A tricune (Lat.: "triple wedge") is a geometric figure formed of three passion-nails cojoined in estoile at the heads. (HB, 5 Feb 72 [50], p. 1) [The term appears to be a neologism.]

PEAN

The Lord Laurel said that (1) pean was not a fur allowed by the College; (2) N. could have no exceptions. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 4) [The term pean was wait to be out of period, although one could apparently have a field sable, ermines Or.]

PELICAN

Two years ago Dorothy of Paravel applied for a pelican badge. At that time the Board of Directors said that they reserved the ... pelican for their own use EXCLUSIVELY. (KFW, 5 Dec 73 [44], p. 1)

The Pelican is, apparently, reserved for the BoD. Will the Steward please confirm in writing? (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

PEN

According to our sources, "pen" means only a quill-pen, not a reed-pen (calamus). (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 2)

PENTACLE

see MAGIC

PERIOD

Keep your arms simple, in the manner of the Thirteenth or Fourteenth Centuries. That makes them easy to recognize on the field. (RoH, late 1968 [2], p. 13)

A dondril was not known to Medieval Europe, but we have too few canting arms. (HB, 14 May 70 [5], p. 4)

The original purpose of arms was to distinguish warriors on the field and in the lists. This same purpose is the main point to consider in choosing arms. For this reason, the College uses as a model Englis[h] Heraldry of the period 1300 to 1450. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 8)

It was decided to raise the cut-off date for the period approved by the College from 1450 to 1485, the date of the end of the Plantagenet line in England considered as marking the end of the Middle Ages in that country. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 1)

We had thought his [charge] to be out of period, but he has documentation to support it. (HB, 7 Web 71 [12], p. 9)

He wished a wavy-crested division which is rather late. He could have either undy or engrailed; we suggest the latter. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

[Brilliant cut emerald.] We are not certain whether jewels were faceted then, but do not consider it that vital. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 5)

In the fanciful system of "rebatements" evolved by decadent heralds later than our period, a gore was a rebatement for cowardice. However, in this system, the rebatements were always of the stains, particularly tenne. Neither stains nor abatements have so far been allowed to intrude upon the purity of Society heraldry, so the gore sinister in this case is simply another pretty kind of partition of the field. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3) [The gore is a charge, not a partition of the field.]

A serpent, or bass cornetto, is post-1485 but so are many charges that have been passed. (ROW, 9 Apr 72 [28], p. 1)

Corinthian columns are late, decadent heraldry. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 3)

The Opinicus as a charge is out of period. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 1) [Rodney Dennys, in The Heraldic Imagination, cites occurrences of the opinicus as a supporter in 1556 and 1561. At the time of this ruling, the cut-off late for charges was 1485.]

A Claymore is the two-handed greatsword with trooping quill[o]ns terminated in three or four rings. This term was used until the advent of the Claybeg (what this person terms a claymore) in the 17th Century. The claybeg is more properly called the Scots version of the Venetian Schiavona. (See Stone's Glossary.) If this person is going to go Scots, maybe a little more research is in order. We suggest that the Claybeg be replaced with a weapon more in period with the College. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

PERMISSION

This is a counterchange of N. without the [charge], for which he enclosed a letter of permission. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 4)

N. and M. represent allied and related households ... hence the appearance of similar charges in their personal devices and badges. Documentation has been supplied to the College of Heralds indicating the affiliation of these households and the desire of the persons concerned to bear these devices & use these badges; no infringement of one individual's device or badge upon another individual's device or badge is meant. (KFW, 1 Jan 72 [21], p. 2)

Several members of his household wish to have arms with different charges on the same field as his. He is willing to authorize this and will not consider it infringement. Master Frederick secured a statement from him, as follows: "I, N. Of M., to hereby authorize Members of the house of M. to use variants of the arms of M., suitably differences, as their personal arms. Such variants will be approved by me prior to submission. /s/ N. of M." He will suitably endorse each application. Master Frederick did not guarantee success with this procedure; the final decision rests with the Lord Laurel. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 4)

PERSONA

Why can't people put together halfway consistent medieval identities? N. touched me off, but I could cite you several dozen examples almost as bad. Name should agree with surname and ekenames, and arms should be in keeping. I wish more people followed the Scandinavian practice of taking a surname that corresponds to the coat of arms -- most people had patronymics, and when a man was ennobled he took arms and surname together. Thus Hammarskjold has crossed hammers with four roundels, Oxenstjerna a bull's head with a star, and Papegoy -- I'm not kidding -- a parrot. (KFW, 31 Jan 72 [23], p. 2)

Then came the Lord Laurel King-of-Arms asking our opinion on certain problems contained in a letter from N. ... inquiring about multiple personae and whether they have separate registrations, arms, and awards. What to you to if you're a monk in the morning and a musician in the afternoon? Our answer was, Be them, but to not attempt to formalize it. The Lord Laurel gave us the impression that the Imperial College of Arms is of a mind to register only one device per human being, regardless of number of personae. N. seems to feel that it is not seemly for a herald to fight, or for a Great Lord of State to be a guildmaster. Master Frederick of Holland, Greencloak Herald, is both a herald and a fighter and finds no difficulty; he takes off or puts on a cloak as required. As for this College, we will not accept names without devices, which is not our job. If one has only one device registered there is no problem in transferring it; only one persona registers arms, and any other persona may bear them, but not other ones. We recommend to N.'s attention Njal Styrbjornsonr, who when he needs to write a letter or attend a Christian gathering becomes Brother Clement; not to mention that well-known samurai, Duke Henrik the Dane. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 4)

PERSPECTIVE

[Semy of frets of three annulets in perspective.] Firstly, we object to seme of lithium atoms. Secondly, an annulet in perspective will not do on fourteenth-century arms, since perspective had not yet been invented. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 5) [Actually, perspective was known in Classical times and was being re-invented by illuminators -- see the Belles Heures -- in the late 14th century. I agree that it doesn't belong in heraldry, though. KFW]

PIERCED

see BASS CORNETTO

PILE

Wolf's teeth are like little curved piles. When issuant from the sides of a shield they conventionally point downward. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

The phrase "pile in point" replaces the phrase "pile from base" used previously to describe a pile issuing from the base. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 3) [This is incorrect. "Piles in point" is the modern term for the medieval practice of depicting two or more piles (issuant from chief) with their points meeting in base. A pile issuant from base is blazoned reversed in mundane armory, and inverted in the SCA.]

PIZZLED

The English have a word for it too! Replace "vil[e]ne" with pizzled and cullioned. (IoL, 9 Mar 73 [63], p. 1) [Vilene ("having the virile parts of a specified tincture") is a term from French blazon. I have located a couple of references to pizzled, but cullioned appears to be a neologism; Brooke-Little gives the English term as coded.]

PLUMETTY

Lord Clarion said, Plumetty is not allowable. Fiat. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 8)

POMMELLED

By Society convention, the word "hilted" covers "quill[o]ned" and "pommelled" when all three are of the same tincture. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

PORTCULLIS

By convention, a portcullis is shown with a short chain attached to the upper part of either side. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

PRECEDENT

We have a precedent for the usage of the "Brown Bear proper" in SCA heraldry already. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2) [I.e., genus and species were not required.]

Please cite a precedent for the use of tartan in heraldic Arms. Otherwise, alter the damn thing to better heraldry. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

PRIMROSE

Lady Johanna said that this was the first time a distinction between heraldic roses, roses proper, field roses, and primroses had even come up in her book. And Lord Clarion made this distinction: a heraldic rose is five-petaled, barbed and seeded sometimes with other colors. A rose proper is a rose gules, barbed vert and seeded or. A primrose has four petals. (Though, Lady Banner said, a real primrose has five.) A garden rose, or field rose, looks like a real rose, with more petals than five. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

PROPER

Objects placed on the field as charges can be "proper." "Proper" is the true color of the object. This can be used as long as it is recognizable against the field. A raven proper on a field sable would not be allowed, but a raven proper on a field gules is allowable. When something is called "proper" only one distinctive color should come to mint; a raven proper is obviously black, but what color is a horse proper? (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 9)

[Brown bears proper.] We must have the Latin name of Bears that are only coloured brown. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [60], p. 1)

We have a precedent for the usage of the "Brown Bear proper" in SCA heraldry already. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 2) [I.e., genus and species were not required. ]

Please note the difference between a red camellia proper, which is drawn realistically, and a camellia gules, which is stylized. (IoL, 30 Jun 75 [81], p. 3)

PUBLIC DOMAIN

N. wishes to change her device to [blazon]. we shall approve it, and note that her old device is back in public domain. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2) [In this case, public domain is being used to indicate that the old coat is now vacant (i.e., the design is up for grabs).]

For the Imperial Chronicler, we first considered three quills, but three people already have the like, which makes it public domain. (KFW, 12 Nov 72 [35], p. 2) [The intended meaning of public domain is unclear. From the context, it would appear that the arrangement of charges had been used so frequently as to preclude any further non-conflicting variations; but this sense is in direct opposition to the definition of "public domain." In a letter to Dragon Herald some five years later, Karina noted that "public domain and common property were used with various meanings at different times." I am inclined to regard this particular instance as a slip of the pen.]

There are so many previous instances of this kind of beast that it's common property. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 3) [The doctrine of common property seems to have been that if enough different holders of a mundane coat could be found, then the mundane conflicts were ignored.]

This probably conflicts with several Spanish arms, and since there are several we don't mind. If we find fifteen other families doing the same thing, why should we complain about the sixteenth? (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 1) [The submission was approved.]

QUARTERING

see MARSHALLING

QUARTERLY

A distinction should be made between "the field quarterly" and "quartered arms." Quarterly divides the field into four parts, the first and fourth being of one tincture and the second and third of another tincture. However, metal cannot be used with metal, color with color or fur with fur ... A charge may be placed in any one quarter ... or one charge may be placed over all four quarters ... provided it is not of a tinc[t]ure used in the quarters. This is an exception to the metal on metal, color on color rule. Quartered arms have the field divided per quarterly [sic] and a different charge in each quarter ... Traditionally, quartered arms imply that you had ancestors who bore arms. Because the Society has not been in existence long enough for any one to have had armigerous ancestors quartering of arms is not allowable. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 10)

[Quarterly or and argent.] He will be expected to emblazon it with a nice dark yellow [O]r so that it can be told from the argent. (KFW, 12 Feb 73 [38], p. 1)

Quarterly follows the Rule of Tincture ... always. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

We admit the appeal on RoT [Rule of Tincture] in regards to quarterly, and heartily thank all concerned. We honestly didn't know. (IoL, 1 Nov 73 [73], p. 1) [This reverses the ruling of 1 Sep 73.]

QUILL

According to our sources, "pen" means only a quill-pen, not a reed-pen (calamus). (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 2)

QUILLONED

By Society convention, the word "hilted" covers "quill[o]ned" and "pommelled" when all three are of the same tincture. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

RAINBOW

[A rainbow gules, argent, azure, or and purpure.] Parker says a rainbow is or, gules, vert and argent, which looks even less like a rainbow. Note that it is neither a heraldic rainbow nor a rainbow proper, and might they consider something else? (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

By special letter the Lord Laurel will redefine this blazon and give particulars on what is a heraldic rainbow and what is a special rainbow made up for the purpose. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [55], p. 1)

RAMPANT

Lord Seraphim said that contourne means rampant to sinister, rather than simply facing sinister, but we do not seem to do it that way and he was overruled. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 7) [Woodward and Parker both state that contourny describes an animal turned toward the sinister side of the shield; Brooke-Little implies that the term may also be applied to inanimate charges. It should be noted that a lion contourny will in fact be rampant to the sinister, since in the absence of other information, a lion is assumed to be rampant. This may have been the source of Seraphim's error.]

He wonders whether a mouse can ramp, but we say why not. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 1)

REBATEMENT

see ABATEMENT

RELIGION

With the exception of the cross, religious, magical and astrological symbols were never used during the period we have taken as our model. [During the Middle Ages, of course, ladies and gentlemen of the Jewish persuasion (Thank you, Moses Mendelsohn) were never given arms; for that reason the Seal of Solomon or the Star of David may be used in Society arms as a charge -- Randall of Hightower.] (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], pp. 9-10)

[Bishop N.] So far as the Society is concerned, he's a layman, else half the Society would have ecclesiastical trappings courtesy of the ULC [Universal Life Church]. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 1)

Lord Clarion noted that questions have been asked about crosses; that there is no restriction of shape of a cross, but that a papal cross or an arch[i]episcopal cross should be born[e] only by a Pope or Archbishop, and there are by definition none in the Society, where all are laymen (as previously established in the case of Bp. N.). (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

If he says he is going by Islamic heraldry, we will say that in Islam he could not have a feather as a charge, because it is too close to something alive. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5) [We have not actually checked Islamic heraldry. KFW]

This is a paynim device but is acceptable. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 1) [It should be noted that, although comments were made on several occasions that a device was not in keeping with the religious precepts of the submitter's persona, I can find no record of a submission having been rejected solely on these grounds. In the present case, the submission was approved.]

If he is going to be a proper Jew, he must remember that Mosaic law prohibits the portrayal of living creatures or parts thereof (cf. the prohibition in Exodus against graven images). (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 3)

We cannot say that we don't register religious groups, for Randall of Hightower's former bishop registered one. (KFW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 2)

What about the rules against religious objects? (There aren't any.) (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 5)

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70], p. 4)

RESERVED CHARGES

N. can't have [an] Imperial Japanese chrysanthemum, not even with 15 petals instead of whatever number they usually have (16?). (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 1)

He can't have [a] clan escutcheon, we won't have shields on shields ... (A blank escutcheon would be ok.) (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 4)

N. wishes a crown which he ... may not have. Let him be told that crowns and coronets are reserved for kingdoms. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 3)

It was decided to reserve the use of the cap of maintenance to the corporate arms of the Board of Directors and other Society and Kingdom bodies (the various Colleges and Offices, &c.). (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 1)

Lord Clarion noted that questions have been asked about crosses; that there is no restriction of shape of a cross, but that a papal cross or an arch[i]episcopal cross should be born[e] only by a Pope or Archbishop, and there are by definition none in the Society, where all are laymen (as previously established in the case of Bp. N.). (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. Whether or not to restrict all roses, any roses, or any particular kind of roses is a problem, since there are assorted single roses in arms already registered. (HB, 7 Feb [12], p. 3)

The Associated Guilds of Atenveldt (unlike ours, they are part of the Society that Kingdom) cannot have arms with a laurel wreath and crown until they are authorized by the Board of Directors. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5)

Regarding caps of maintenance, the Board has nothing to say as regards making and wearing them. Heraldically, on the other hand, they are reserved. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

Lady Johanna would prefer to use roses and laurel, but heraldic roses, rather than field roses which are too hard to paint, particularly on the tiny wreaths above the arms of the Ladies of the Rose. Lord Laurel makes a Fiat as follows: The Queen of the West will bear garden roses, but wreaths for the Ladies of the Rose will have heraldic roses, thus differentiating the [Order] of the Rose, which exists in all Kingdoms, from the Queen of the West. All other use of wreaths of roses of any kind is reserved. One or two roses, or seme of roses (which is not a wreath) of any kind is allowed. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

N. wants something which is rather too much like Aesculapi[u]s. We'll write her a letter. Perhaps she could have a sword twined with enchanter's nightshade? (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 3) [The Rod of Aesculapius (the Latin name of Asklepios, Greek got of medicine) has a serpent entwined about it. It is a symbol of the medical profession, and as such is a reserved charge.]

The red hand is the symbol of the baronets of Ulster, and he can't have it. (Even though he's a descendant of Ulstermen. Even if he were a descendant of Ulster baronets, he can't have it in the Society, it's an augmentation from the Queen.) (KFW, 13 May 73 [41], p. 2)

Queens in the Society use Wreaths of Roses. Princesses use Chaplets. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 4)

Chapl[e]ts are reserved for the Arms of Princesses. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

Two years ago Dorothy of Paravel applied for a pelican badge. At that time the Board of Directors said that they reserved the ... pelican for their own use EXCLUSIVELY. (KFW, 5 Dec 73 [44], p. 1)

The Pelican is, apparently, reserved for the BoD. Will the Stewart please confirm in writing? (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

ROSE

Lady Johanna said that this was the first time a distinction between heraldic roses, roses proper, field roses, and primroses had even come up in her book. and Lord Clarion made this distinction: a heraldic rose is five-petaled, barbed and seeded sometimes with other colors. A rose proper is a rose gules, barbed vert and seeded or. A primrose has four petals. (Though, Lady Banner said, a real primrose has five.) A garden rose, or field rose, looks like a real rose, with more petals than five. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 2)

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. whether or not to restrict all roses, any roses, or any particular kind of roses is a problem, since there are assorted single roses in arms already registered. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 3)

Lady Johanna would prefer to use roses and laurel, but heraldic roses, rather than field roses which are too hard to paint, particularly on the tiny wreaths above the arms of the Ladies of the Rose. Lord Laurel makes a Fiat as follows: The Queen of the West will bear garden roses, but wreaths for the Ladies of the Rose will have heraldic roses, thus differentiating the [Order] of the Rose, which exists in all Kingdoms, from the Queen of the West. All other use of wreaths of roses of any kind is reserved. One or two roses, or seme of roses (which is not a wreath) of any kind is allowed. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

It appears unnecessary to say that the rose is barbed and seeded unless of a different color. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2)

Queens in the Society use Wreaths of Roses. Princesses use Chaplets. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 4)

ROUNDEL

A "fountain," in traditional heraldry, is a roundel barry wavy argent and azure, representing a spring, pond, lake, etc. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [8], p. 4)

RULE OF THREE

see DIFFERENCE

S'ELONGEANT

The term s'elong[e]ant denotes a Cat in the act of stretching, while standing on its feet, as opposed to their habit of stretching while lying on their back ... good work! (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 1)

SANGUINE

Some arms have been submitted to the College using tenne (orangy-red) or sanguine (purplish-red) and have been rejected. These colors do occur in late continental European heraldry and are occa[s]ionally used as livery colors in England but they appear in the later, decadent period and are not acceptable. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 9)

SCA BRANCH

The Council of Seneschals has enquired whether baronies, cantons, and the like should choose a name before or after applying to the College of Heralds. It is answered that while they should check arms with a [herald], it is for the Imperium to rule on the choice of names. and they should not submit arms to the College until they have been accredited through the Imperial College of Electors [Board of Directors]. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 1)

The banner of a barony is not the property of an individual baron/ess. It should be displayed in the same manner that a state flag is within the United States: That is, it should be considered as the emblem of a people who are, tho[ugh] united, su[bo]rdinate to a greater authority, and in no circumstances should a baron/ess display it as his/her own. (HB, 22 Mar 72 [51], p. 2)

see also LAUREL WREATH

SCROLLS

N. wishes to alter his arms to [blazon]. Since apparently he has not been awarded any scroll of arms, we have no objection. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

The Imperial College of Arms was informed by Sarkanyi and the Lord Clarion that the wording of the present Scrolls of Arms as used in the Society was not satisfactory, because as presently worded, these scrolls would not stand up as legal instruments in any court of law. For instance, they do not specify by whom or under what authority the Arms are given. The Lord Seraphim therefore presented to the Imperial College drafts of proposed new scrolls of Arms, both in Latin and in English, and of a proclamation which might be made by the King of any Kingdom instituting the new scrolls. (RoH, 13 Jun 71 [45], p. 1)

Let me specify that it is now and always has been the policy of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc., and of the College of Arms, that the official language for Society documents, proceedings, ceremonies and communications of any kind whatsoever is English, nor should any other language be used as the principal medium of official Society documents, Proceedings, ceremonies or communications. (RoH, 14 Sep 71 [46], p. 2)

"1. Arms may only be granted by the King of a Kingdom. 2. Arms to be granted by the King must be passed as far as correctness and non-duplication go by the Kingdom College of Heralds and the Imperial College of Arms. 3. Note that these are two different functions. The King has no Business passing on the correctness of arms and the College of Heralds has no business awarding arms." [Stefan de Lorraine, Seneschal of the West] ... To insure that the proper functions of both parties remain sep[a]rate and inviolate, I do order that no Heraldic officer shall sign any scroll of arms unless he has 1) a written request from the King, and 2) the letter from the Imperial College verifying the proposed arms ... A scroll of arms, prepared in the approved and customary manner of the Kingdom, and signed by the King, may be considered as a written request from the King. (HB, 18 Jan 72 [49], p. 1)

Any Society member may design a device to fit upon whichever shape shall be found most pleasing and satisfactory to him or her alone, and may bear his or her device indifferently upon a lozenge or upon an escutcheon; and scribes, calligraphers, and heraldic artists may in the preparation of scrolls or other documents of State, follow the individual preference of the Society member in question, or, in the absence of any preference expressed by the member, may follow their own inclinations at the bidding of their artistic conscience. (HB, 24 Jun 72 [52], p. 1)

SEAL

Regarding the size of seals, the Lord Laurel and the Board to not care to make sumptuary laws. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

SERAPH

[Seraphim proper.] Crined gules, wings displayed gules, covered Or, lined vert and edged azure. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 1)

SERPENT

[Sea-serpent ondoyant-emergent.] Ondoyant-emergent is a term coined by the College of Heralds of the West to represent a sea-serpent or other creature drawn as below: [picture] and not to be confused with the same creature dismembered: [picture]. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 1) [In the letter of intent of 25 Oct 71, the body of the serpent is described as "emerging from the water at intervals in a wave-like fashion, alternate parts of the body presumed to be underwater."]

A serpent "involved" is one rolled into a circle with its tail in its mouth. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2) [The serpent's head is on the sinister side of the shield, facing tester.]

A Jaculus is a winged, leaping snake. (IoL, 31 Mar 75 [79], p. 1)

see also BASS CORNETTO

SHIELDS ON SHIELDS

He can't have [a] clan escutcheon, we won't have shields on shields ... (A blank escutcheon would be ok.) (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 4)

N. cannot have an inescutcheon, and without the inescutcheon his device is identical to a sept of Campbell. Let him be told that John W. God Jr. will get him. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 9)

[Argent, upon a lozenge sable a crescent argent.] This is like saying, "Argent, upon a lozenge Sean Macarailt." Suggest almost any other charge. (HB, 5 Aug 72 [56], p. 1)

Please remove the inescutcheon of pretense. (IoL, 31 Jul 74 [77], p. 1)

SILKIE

A "Silkie" looks like a seal, but has the head, shoulders and hair of a woman. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 16)

SIMILARITY

see PERMISSION

SKULL

Is there any rule against skulls and other grewsome charges? Alas, there is not. (KFW, 14 May 72 [29], p. 2)

SLIPPED

[A sixfoil slipped and singly leaved.] It was enquired whether the term "slipped" includes one leaf. The Society has used "slipped and leaved" for a stem and two or three leaves; we cannot lose by specifying, since she wants just one leaf in the position shown on the emblazon. (ROW, 11 Jun 72 [30], p. 1) [The charge was registered as a six-foil gules, slipped vert.]

SNAKE

see SERPENT

SNOWFLAKE

[Sable, a snowflake argent.] This is non-heraldic, which is what she wanted ... we approve it as a non-heraldic badge. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

[Sable, a snowflake argent.] While passable as a device, this is not acceptable as Arms. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 3)

SOLOMON'S SEAL

He supplies documentation (a document by a Franciscan friar born 1305, translated in the National Geographic of October 1917 under the title "Heroic Flags of the Middle Ages") for Solomon's-seals on medieval arms and flags. So much for our argument that they were not used. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], pp. 1-2)

SPECIES

[Screech owl proper.] The Lord Banner doesn't care to differentiate species heraldically. But considering we differentiate the rest of the arms, we needn't cavil at giving people the species they want. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 2)

see also GENUS AND SPECIES

SPIDER

[Spider extended.] It is noted that a spider may be extended, or collected, or perhaps a spider rampant, displayed, couchant and statant. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 1) [Extended and collected appear to describe the disposition of the spidery legs.]

SQUIRREL

The convention is that in default, squir[rel]s are shown sejant and nibbling on an acorn held between the forepaws. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2)

STAIN

Some arms have been submitted to the College using tenne (orangy-red) or sanguine (purplish-red) and have been rejected. These colors do occur in late continental European heraldry and are occa[s]ionally used as livery colors in England but they appear in the later, decadent period and are not acceptable. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 9)

Neither stains nor abatements have so far been allowed to intrude upon the purity of Society heraldry. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3)

STAR

We have turned down constellations before and are prepared to do so again. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 1)

[Semy of stars a naturelle.] Creative heraldry: "A NATURELLE" [sic] means simply that the stars are not mullets nor estoiles, but are drawn in varying ways, as real stars look. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 1) [This is a misnomer. The French idiom au naturel uses the definite article, and is masculine in gender. In French blazon, it means proper.]

STARCROSS

A starcross, also called a millrind, looks like an asterisk; it is automatically couped. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 2) [According to Alfgar the Sententious, who handled this submission, the SCA starcross is "a figure consisting of a pale couped conjoined with a saltire couped, like an asterisk, or a straight mill-rind." The usage appears to be unique to SCA heraldry.]

STARFLOWER

[Three starflowers proper.] That is, argent, with centres or and stamens gules. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 4) [The term starflower is applied to any of several plants having star-shaped pentamerous flowers, especially Trientalis americana.]

STYLE

If Her current Majesty complains about our heraldry, and offers to design her own, let us say to her, "Your Majesty, you are a creative artist, an expressive artist, and heraldry is a branch of mechanical drawing." (HB, 15 Feb 70 [3], p. 7)

It is ugly but heraldic and we must pass it. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 4)

N. wants a dreadful mess of [blazon]. The more shocking when this man is M.'s pursuivant. M. notes that it is godawful, but that the fellow insisted. We shall answer that it is indeed godawful, and why did he forward it? He is instructed to reject it, and the pursuivant is instructed to obey him. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], Up. 5)

She's putting her whole life story on her damn shield, but there's nothing we can to about it. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 10)

Let him be sent a firm #2 [rejection for stated cause], saying to begin all over again, and that we fear he does not understand our intent, which is to learn to be gentlemen and ladies. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 2)

We have no duplications and no objections, nay rather, we applaud the use of a little-used charge. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

Boncue[u]r said, After all, we are not doing illustrations for a zoology textbook; we are trying to fix it so that anyone who sees it will say, That's a [charge], that's a great ugly mother of a [charge] (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4)

We have an answer from N., who wanted ... everything in the catalog. We suggested he devise something with one or two items. He has replied that he doesn't want to simplify it at all. (Obviously one of these misguided people who want their device to represent their entire life history.) (KFW, 15 Oct 72 [34], p. 1)

SUFFLUE

The clarion as defined by the Imperial College is that curious shape sometimes otherwise known as claricord, sufflue, organ-rest, &c, and having nothing to do with a "clarion-trumpet," a kind of brass wind-instrument resembling a trombone. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1)

SUMPTUARY LAWS

A tentative listing was then put forth of sizes and varieties of seals, robes, regalia, and caps of maintenance. Lord Laurel does not like any such regulations, saying that it approaches the situation of sumptuary laws, which we have been trying to avoid. The content of seals of offices is in our province, but not their size. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 1)

Regarding the size of seals, the Lord Laurel and the Board to not care to make sumptuary laws. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

Regarding caps of maintenance, the Board has nothing to say as regards making and wearing them. Heraldically, on the other hand, they are reserved. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

She would like to have lots of crowns, circlets, et caetera, all to be standardized to show one's exact rank. Aside from the fact that no one could afford them, they aren't medieval. Those elegant things you see the Lords wearing at coronations which they don't own, but rent from D'Oyly Carte -- are much later. and we don't even a little bit need sumptuary laws. (KFW, 12 Feb 73 [38], p. 4)

SUN

A sun in splendour is by definition Or. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 1) [My references define the sun in splendor as being one with a human face.]

A Sun eclipsed is, by convention, sable. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 8) [This is the mundane definition of a sun eclipsed.]

[Sable, a sun eclipsed Or.] That is, all that can be seen is the corona. This won't conflict with any of the others, and we thought we'd used them up. Such creativity is to be encouraged. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 3) [This is the SCA definition. According to Parker, the mundane sun eclipsed is one that is tinctured sable.]

SUN DISK

[Cross potent rebated in annulo.] In plain terms, he wanted an ancient Indo-European sun disk, or fylfot, sometimes known as a swastika, a rounded version thereof. And there was great debate on all sides. It boiled down to this: nobody objected to the sun disk, and everybody objected to the word swastika, and so the blazon was carefully reworded. (KFW, 16 Jan 72 [22], p. 4) [The submission was approved.]

The Lord Banner vouches for the Coptic cross, which looks like a Zuni sun disc with single instead of triple rays, the vertical rays longer than the horizontal ones. (KFW, 11 Mar 73 [39], p. 1)

SUPPORTER

We do not, at the present time, use crests, mottoes, or supporters on the scrolls or in the Great Book of Arms. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 14)

SWASTIKA

see FYLFOT

SWEPE

A "swepe" is a trebuchet. By convention, objects are drawn with their "business end" to dexter; thus, the swepe is seen from the side as if aiming a missile at a target offstage dexter. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

SWORD

By Society convention, the word "hilted" covers "quill[o]ned" and "pommelled" when all three are of the same tincture. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

Since long, narrow objects usually found upright are by convention emblazoned in that position unless otherwise specified in the blazon, and by convention with the business end (point of a sword, for instance) up, it is unnecessary to say "a mace erect." An exception to this rule is the arrow, which is usually shown with the head down. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 2)

[Broken sword chevronwise.] By convention the point of this sword will be to dexter. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 3)

The default position of a Sword is "palewise point in chief." (IoL, 1 Mar 73 [61], p. 1)

A Claymore is the two-handed greatsword with drooping quill[o]ns terminated in three or four rings. This term was used until the advent of the Claybeg (what this person terms a claymore) in the 17th Century. The claybeg is more properly called the Scots version of the Venetian Schiavona. (See Stone's Glossary.) If this person is going to go Scots, maybe a little more research is in order. We suggest that the Claybeg be replaced with a weapon more in period with the College. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

[Hoflichkeit sword proper.] This is the figure on His Grace's Arms, in Or and Sable. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [74], p. 5) [The figure, variously blazoned, is a mullet of four points elongated to base, gyronny or and sable.]

TADPOLE

The default position of a tadpole is ... seen from the side, head to dexter, no legs. When tadpoles are said to be legged, they are seen from above, head to dexter. (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 17)

TAIL

[Tail extended and embowed-counterembowed.] We believe the tail would be better described "bowed-embowed," but in fact that is the usual position for the tail of an animal passant (cf. the lion of Randall of Hightower) and the tail need not be described. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2)

TARTAN

The Lady Karina said: so far as tartans are concerned, if someone in the Society wishes to design a unique sett and WEAVE IT HIMSELF, we shall register it. But we shall not register setts of cloth bought off a bolt, commercially. And the burden of proof should be on the appellant. The Weavers and Spinners Guilds might wish to keep track of tartans. (KFW, 13 Jun 71 [18], p. 7)

Please cite a precedent for the use of tartan in heraldic Arms. Otherwise, alter the damn thing to better heraldry. (IoL, 31 Jan 74 [75], p. 1)

TENNE

Some arms have been submitted to the College using tenne (orangy-ret) or sanguine (purplish-ret) and have been rejected. These colors to occur in late continental European heraldry and are occa[s]ionally used as livery colors in England but they appear in the later, decadent period and are not acceptable. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 9)

Neither stains nor abatements have so far been allowed to intrude upon the purity of Society heraldry. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 3)

TERGIANT

[In pale two turtles turgiant.] "Turgiant," believe it or not, is the technical term for whatever turtles do. In this case they are doing it in bend, all four legs outstretched. This is one of the several conventionally allowable positions for turtles when none is specified. Heading straight upwards is another. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 2) [Tergiant (from Latin tergum, "back") means "turned with its back to the viewer."]

THISTLE

By Society convention the head of a thistle "proper" is purpure. In the heraldry of our Period it was gules. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 1)

For purposes of Society heraldry, a thistle "proper" is Purpure, this being the natural colour of the thistles we see growing wild all about us, including in the back-yard of Society headquarters. (HB, 14 Dec 71 [48], p. 2)

THOR'S HAMMER

The "prohibition on devices magickal" is on: symbols of evil intent, letters in any alphabet (on devices), alchemical and astrological signs. Thus, a Thor's Hammer is quite proper, but an inverted pentangle is not. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [70],

THUNDERBOLT

The lightning-flash ... is not the same thing as the traditional heraldic thunderbolt. (HB, 26 Jun 72 [54], p. 2) [The submission was approved.]

TIERCE

Like a pale, a tierce sinister or dexter will occupy one-fifth of the shield, roughly, if uncharged, and one-third, roughly, if charged. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 4)

TIERCED

[Gyronny of three arrondi, gules, Or, and purpure.] Alternative blazons for this pinwheel-like field division are "tierced in gyrons arrondi" and "tierced in gyron gyronnant." We believe the first one given is the clearest and most descriptive, for someone who has acquired the basic heraldic vocabulary. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

TIGER

The College defines "leopard" as a lion passant guardant. Should the spotted cat known in modern times as a leopard be desired as a charge, it will be blazoned as "an African leopard." (Cf. "a tyger" -- "a Bengal tiger.") (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], pp. 4-5)

TINCTURE

Quarterly divides the field into four parts, the first and fourth being of one tincture and the second and third of another tincture. However, metal cannot be used with metal, color with color or fur with fur ... A charge may be placed in any one quarter ... or one charge may be placed over all four quarters ... provided it is not of a tinc[t]ure used in the quarters. This is an exception to the metal on metal, color on color rule. (JvG, Summer 1970 [6], p. 10)

N. has metal on metal ... Let him submit new arms. (HB, 2 Dec 70 [9], p. 2)

The emblem of a bear statant was registered to Sir Caradoc ap Cador ... The emblem of a grape-leaf and tendril was registered to Sir Bela of Eastmarch. (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], p. 2) [Both badges were registered without field or tincture.]

The gurges on N.'s Viking ship sail should not be colour-and-colour, but colour-and-metal. Apparently a gurges is not treated like a field party; the present case would be a violation of the rule of tincture. (BdM, 3 Jan 71 [11], p. 1)

[Sable, a mount vert.] This is color on color -- though many mounts have been used without regard to color; a mount proper is ipso facto vert. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 9) [The submission was rejected.]

A gore is not a field division but a charge, and this device violates tincture. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 4)

This is not only metal on metal but argent on argent, will look like a blob, and is rejected. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 5)

The use of fimbriation is incorrect; it is used to avoid color on color or metal on metal, rather than to introduce it. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 7)

By the example of Robert Roundpounder, flames can act as insulation against color on color. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 1)

Bordures, chiefs, and augmentations are exempt from the laws of tincture. (KFW, 12 Mar 72 [26], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that bordures and chiefs are subject to the rule of tincture.]

Badges don't need to conform to the rule of tincture. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 2) [Current SCA policy is that badges must obey the rule of tincture.]

He is worried about badges. We must tell him they aren't heraldic. We don't require fields on badges; we just don't forbid them. Consider the badges of Ravnsgaard (MX) and Eastmarch (a vine leaf and tendril), neither of which have tinctures specified, let alone fields. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], pp. 3-4)

Quarterly follows the Rule of Tincture ... always. (IoL, 1 Sep 73 [71], p. 2)

We admit the appeal on RoT [Rule of Tincture] in regards to quarterly, and heartily thank all concerned. We honestly didn't know. (IoL, 1 Nov 73 [73], p. 1) [This reverses the ruling of 1 Sep 73.]

TITLE

[Bishop N.] So far as the Society is concerned, he's a layman, else half the Society would have ecclesiastical trappings courtesy of the ULC [Universal Life Church]. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [7], p. 1)

He [Duke Siegfried] suggests that a lady who has been Queen twice be named a Duchess in her own right, whether or not she is still the lady of the Duke; so that there would be two varieties of Duchess: the current lady of a Duke, and a lady who has been twice Queen. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 5)

N. cannot call himself Margrave of M.; we are using Margrave as a synonym for Duke. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 6)

The question of titles for landed and unlanded Barons was then discussed. The present ruling is that landed Barons, who are noblesse d'epee, are called Baron of N., and unlanded Barons, who are noblesse de robe, are called Baron N. (KFW, 13 Feb 72 [24], p. 3)

"Margraf" is [a] title not used in [the] S.C.A. Please advise N. (IoL, 31 Jul 74 [76], p. 8)

see also NAME - TITLE

TREBUCHET

A "swepe" is a trebuchet. By convention, objects are drawn with their "business end" to dexter; thus, the swepe is seen from the side as if aiming a missile at a target offstage dexter. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

TRESSURE

What N. desired was nothing more nor less than an addition to his former arms [blazon] of a double tressure axy-counteraxy, the inner sable, the outer gules ... Now, N. is highly interested in things Scottish, and it is easy to see whence he got this tressure. For a double tressure fleury-counterfleury was part of the Royal Arms of Scotland and was occasionally given to earls or higher, by the King, for an augmentation of honour. We have no augmentations as yet except the canton of the royal arms counterchanged which was given to Headless House. and in any case, how can he give himself an augmentation? We could try to convince the Baron to give him an augmentation, but imprimis he isn't ready for it and secundus it is not our business to convince the baron to do anything ... The other alternative is to reserve tressures, either altogether or as possible augmentations in the future. Therefore we referred the entire matter to the Imperial College of Arms. (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 3) [Who reserved tressures altogether. KFW]

TRICUNE

A tricune (Lat.: "triple wedge") is a geometric figure formed of three passion-nails cojoined in estoile at the heads. (HB, 5 Feb 72 [50], p. 1) [The term appears to be a neologism.]

"Tricune" is an old Germano-Norse design that may also be described as "three passion-nails cojoined in estoile at the heads.' (IoL, 14 Jan 73 [58], p. 16)

TRISKELION

We assume that "a triskelion reversed" is what he meant by "a triskelion inverted"; a standard triskelion is running deasil and this one is widdershins. (KFW, 9 Apr 72 [27], p. 2)

TURGIANT

see TERGIANT

TURTLE

[In pale two turtles turgiant.] "Turgiant," believe it or not, is the technical term for whatever turtles do. In this case they are doing it in bent, all four legs outstretched. This is one of the several conventionally allowable positions for turtles when none is specified. Heading straight upwards is another. (KFW, 25 Oct 71 [20], p. 2) [Tergiant (from Latin tergum, "back") means "turned with its back to the viewer."]

TYGER

The College defines "leopard" as a lion passant guardant. Should the spotted cat known in modern times as a leopard be desired as a charge, it will be blazoned as "an African leopard." (Cf. "a tyger" -- "a Bengal tiger.") (HB, 1 Jan 71 [10], pp. 4-5)

UNICORN

"Male unicorn" signifies that it is bearded. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

It was inquired whether female unicorns also have beards, since nanny goats have. Lady Banner indignantly protested that a unicorn is not a nanny goat, but it is. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 7) [According to Franklyn and Tanner, "the unicorn is basically a goat, having cloven hooves and being bearded; further, when in the rampant attitude, the unicorn may be blazoned as clymant." Other sources speak of the unicorn as being small "like a kit." Most of the authorities agree, however, that the body and appearance of the unicorn are those of a horse.]

"Forcene" is rearing furiously, said of a horse, but as Brigantia points out unicorns are goats, so it should be not forcene but clymant. (KFW, 17 Dec 72 [36], p. 4) [The final blazon was forceny.]

VANITY

A mermaid is conventionally shown (unless otherwise specified in the blazon) as holding a mirror in one hand, into which she is looking, and a comb in the other, with which she is combing her hair. The term "Mermaid in her vanity" has been adopted to represent this convention. (HB, 18 Oct 70 [8], p. 4)

VILENE

The English have a word for it too! Replace "vil[e]ne" with pizzled and cullioned. (IoL, 9 Mar 73 [63], p. 1) [Vilene ("having the virile parts of a specified tincture") is a term from French blazon. I have located a couple of references to pizzled, but cullioned appears to be a neologism; Brooke-Little gives the English term as coded.]

VOLANT

see MIGRANT

VOLANT EN ARRIERE

The default position for a butterfly is seen with the body palewise, wings spread out flat to either side, fully extended. This is sometimes called "volant en arriere." (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

WART HOG

A boar has two tusks and a wart hog four tusks going up and down. (RoH, 25 Apr 71 [17], p. 2)

WAVY CRESTED

He wished a wavy-crested division which is rather late. He could have either undy or engrailed; we suggest the latter. (RoH, 28 Mar 71 [15], p. 1)

WIND

[Boreas affronty.] This is the conventionalized rendering of the wind, as fount on maps and such. (IoL, 30 Apr 73 [64], p. 1)

WING

A pair of wings of any kind is by convention displayed unless otherwise specified in the blazon. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 1)

Bats are usually shown displayed, so one specifies which wing is closed, rather than which is open. (KFW, 13 Aug 72 [32], p. 2)

WOLF'S TEETH

Wolf's teeth are known from the eleventh century; there's a Hungarian family Bathory, meaning "wolf's-teeth." (KFW, 11 Jul 71 [19], p. 4)

Wolf's teeth are like little curved piles. When issuant from the sides of a shield they conventionally point downward. (HB, 20 Sep 71 [47], p. 5)

WOOD

What colour is a wooden wheel? (HB, 5 Aug 72 [56], p. 1)

WREATH

Crowns, laurels, and wreaths of roses are restricted, since they serve to identify the corporate arms of a kingdom, king, or queen. (HB, 7 Feb 71 [12], p. 3)

Lady Johanna would prefer to use roses and laurel, but heraldic roses, rather than field roses which are too hard to paint, particularly on the tiny wreaths above the arms of the Ladies of the Rose. Lord Laurel makes a Fiat as follows: The Queen of the West will bear garden roses, but wreaths for the Ladies of the Rose will have heraldic roses, thus differentiating the [Order] of the Rose, which exists in all Kingdoms, from the Queen of the West. All other use of wreaths of roses of any kind is reserved. One or two roses, or seme of roses (which is not a wreath) of any kind is allowed. (HB, 7 Mar 71 [14], p. 7)

Queens in the Society use Wreaths of Roses. Princesses use Chaplets. (IoL, 30 Jun 73 [67], p. 4)

see also LAUREL WREATH


REFERENCE LIST

West Kingdom. References from the tenure of Harold Breakstone:






Jump to Precedents main page
Jump to Laurel main page



maintained by Codex Herald

This page was last updated on Friday, April 26th, 2013 @ 10:24 am CDT

The arms of the SCA Copyright © 1995 - 2017 Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc.