A-LA-QUISE

A-la-quise (i.e. a la cuisse, "with the thigh"), means that the entire leg is shown. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 8)

ABSTRACT SYMBOL

Badges may have letters and numbers. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 5)

[Nefr.] This isn't a stringed instrument, but an Egyptian hieroglyphic meaning "heart and windpipe." (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 9)

Flags follow the rules for arms, not badges, so no letters are allowed. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

ABSTRUSE

I am aware of the "Golden Section" and "Golden Rectangle" of mathematics, but neither is found in the Oxford English Dictionary or the 11th Britannica. Therefore I consider the concept too abstruse for heraldry. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 6)

ACORN

An acorn "proper" would be all one color. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 16], p. 9)

The acorns should be drawn in natural size relative to the leaves. They have long stalks, and the leaves have short stalks. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 34)

AEOLUS

[Aeolus.] The winds are to be drawn in profile, NOT in trian aspect. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 30)

AESCULAPIUS

Try to avoid anything too reminiscent of the staff of Aesculapius. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 12)

ALEMBIC

The drawing shows a modern retort. An alembic that has been used in heraldry is illustrated on p. 372 of Parker's Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry. (KFW, 20 Nov 78 [23], p. 3) [The entry in Parker is under limbeck. The charge does not even resemble a retort; it looks like some sort of lattice.]

ANNULET

What you have is not a torse but an annulet corded gules and or. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 69)

ANVIL

For an in-period anvil see Jost Amman's BOOK OF TRADES. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 64) [The anvil shown in the illustration for "Der Schmitt" (p. 80 in the Dover edition) has a single horn.]

ARM

Blazon the charge "an arm vested of a maunch"; the sleeve is more commonly empty. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 16], p. 10)

[Infant's arm.] It has pudgy fingers, hence the infant designation. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 27)

ARRONDI

The change from arrondee to arrondi returns the verb to its proper [conjugation]. (KFW, 30 Jan 76 [2], p. 1)

ARTISTIC LICENSE

The epithet "friendly," meaning with portcullis open, is not heraldic and is a matter between N. and his local artist. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 2)

The bordure was submitted "of Celtic knotwork", which isn't heraldry. But she may diaper the bordure in and way that pleases her ... (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 7)

The artist may be instructed to show the foot raised, but it would not be a point of difference and is omitted from the blazon. Besides, an animate charge should be "in the noblest attitude," not limping! (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 28)

Artistic license allows delineation of the mane in or and face in sable. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 39) [The delineation was therefore not blazoned.]

AUGMENTATION

The way you have the laurel wreath on a roundel, it looks like someone's personal device with an augmentation of the Society (not accepted in current usage). (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 65)

AVENTRED

"Aventred" (French ventre, belly) means that the wings extend downward: cf. addorsed. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 6)

BADGE

Badges, including household badges, are borne on roundels, not heaters or any other shape. (KFW, 21 Apr 76 [4], p. 3)

Badges may have letters and numbers. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 5)

Why do you need a badge? Baronial officers are entitled to wear the arms as heralds do, aren't they? (KFW, 09 Jun 77 [13], p. 1)

[A quatrefoil knot.] This is what badges ought to be like -- not secondary coats of arms! (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 2)

The badge is scarcely heraldic, but then a badge needn't be. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 7)

Households with a royal charter ... may have arms; others are restricted to badges. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 9)

You need not actually name any color for a badge; why not drop the field color? (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 10)

I don't mind how many badges you have, but please, one name and one device per body! (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 6)

I can do no better than to quote Lord Codex again: "This sounds more like the crest of an Ugandan General. Are you sure this is a BADGE?" A badge is the sort of thing you use to mark your possessions, small children, faithful retainers, and other tourneyside kipple. It should be simple. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15)

The conclave decided that since this is a badge the difference in gender and markings of the animals is sufficient. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 4)

You can't put the heralds' crossed trumpets on a badge. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 66)

There should not be badges for the lower offices. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 66)

We cannot register [this] until we have the name of an individual, by default that of the head of household, to register it to. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 74)

BAGPIPE

Goats (wild) range from dirty white to black ... The color of the bag must be specified because the bags are usually goatskin. (KFW, 30 Jan 76 [2], p. 4)

BAGWYN

The bagwyn is variously described in my sources as "early sixteenth century," "hard to give an instance," "a supporter." It's a fine-looking monster but I'm afraid it's out of period. Could you settle for a plain old antelope? (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15) [At this time, the cutoff date for charges was 1485 "Early sixteenth century" was thus out of Period.]

BALISETTE

A balisette is a musical instrument in Frank Herbert's DUNE, which makes it out of period by at least several millenia. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 74)

BEAR

The term "sejant", in the case of bears and pandas, means sitting erect with the forepaws raised. (KFW, 12 Dec 75 [1], p. 4)

BEAST

The artist may be instructed to show the foot raised, but it would not be a point of difference and is omitted from the blazon Besides, an animate charge should be "in the noblest attitude," not limping! (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 28)

BELL

"Bell" alone means a church bell. "Oriental bell" would mean a temple bell. "Dancer's bell" would mean Morris-dancer's bell unless otherwise specified. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 6)

BEND

Ld. Codex disapproves pungently of a bend "indented to sinister" so as to look like a flight of steps. "A bend is an Ordinary of Arms, not a staircase." (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15)

Codex would rather we used "cotised" than "costed," though for a bent the latter therm is technically correct. (KFW . 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 3)

BHARAT

[Bharat peacock.l This is from an Indian painting. "Bharat" is Hindi for "India." (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 9)

BIRD

"Stooping" means that the bird is seen affronty, its wings addorsed and its talons extended as if about to pounce on something. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 1)

Statant close is the default position for birds. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 5) [According to Parker, the eagle is an exception, being by default displayed.]

BLAZON

We do not use numbers [e.g. "of the second", but repeat the word. (KFW, 20 Aug 76 [7], p. 4)

Resubmit with correct blazon. Your "Cross-crosslet stitchee" is familiar to the rest of us as a cross-crosslet fitchy, but no one would have known it without seeing the drawing. Thus it has not effectively been circulated to the Kingdom heralds. (KFW, 20 Aug 76 [7], p. 6)

If not otherwise specified, the [charge] would be aligned with the bend. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 7) [The charge is on the bend.]

This isn't heraldry. "Arched - counterarched - arched" is not proper blazon, nor is "per fess wavy of two crests." Please re-do it so it can be blazoned in standard terms. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 14)

The [charges] are three, two, and one. This is the default position for six of any reasonably compact shape on a heater. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 14)

see also ARTISTIC LICENSE

BOOK

The book should be drawn flat in the plane of the device. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 12)

BORDURE

Your device cannot have a colored bordure on a colored field. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

The bordure is a mark of Scottish cadency, and without it, this is too close to [mundane arms]. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 72)

BOREAS

The Boreas in the emblazon is in trian aspect, which is late and not used in Society heraldry. It must be either full face or in profile. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 66)

BROWNIE POINTS

The practice of awarding Brownie points is discontinued. It was originally a merely oral expression of approval (or the reverse), but a too-literal member of the West College assumed that they were recorded. This idea spread to some of his correspondents ... Don't worry ---- I will note strong reactions to devices! (KFW, 12 Dec 75 [1], p. 1)

If I were giving brownie points, this would rate -25 for Ugly. (KFW, 12 Dec 75 [1], p. 4)

BUSY

see COMPLEXITY

CABOSSED

You can't have a collar if the head is cabossed; there's no neck to hang it from. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 63)

CADENCY

Why the label? N. has a label on his arms because he hoped to recruit his father into the Society (never happened); M. used his father's already registered arms with a label. A label means "eldest son of ..."; it isn't just a pretty charge. Give me a logical reason for the label and I'll reconsider. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 9)

Because a chief as the only difference implies a family connection, your arms are not sufficiently different from these and others. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 68)

The bordure is a mark of Scottish cadency, and without it, this is too close to [mundane arms]. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 72)

see also MARSHALLING

CARTOUCHE

Males and females are not required to register their arms on heater and lozenge shape respectively, but may use either shape. Cartouches, on the other hand, are not suited to either ladies or gentlemen in the Society, having been used chiefly by Princes of the Church. (KFW, 21 Apr 76 [4], p. 3)

Do not use a cartouche shape. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 1)

Cartouches are reserved for the Pharaoh. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 56)

CAT

The context ... shows that this is a domestic cat rather than a "catamount," a term loosely applied to several wild species of Felis and Lynx. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 9)

[A cauldron and a domestic cat in its curiosity.] That is, the cat is standing on its hindpaws, its forepaws on the rim of the cauldron, and is peering in. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 6)

[Cat-a-mountain.] This is the European wildcat, similar to the house cat. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 6)

"Catamount" in heraldry generally means the Scottish wild cat, which resembles a large alley cat. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 33)

CELTIC HOUND

Celtic hounds [proper] are brown. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 1) [A Celtic hound appears to be one drawn with stylization of the sort found in Celtic manuscripts.]

CENTAUR

If it were a "sagittary" it would have had a bow and arrow. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 9) [A sagittary (L. sagittarius, "an archer") is traditionally depicted as a centaur drawing a bow to release an arrow.]

CHAIR

A curule chair is a kind of folding camp-stool, having curved legs and no sides or back. Its use was a mark of great distinction. (KFW 29 Oct 76 19], p. 3)

CHALCEDONY

There is no "proper" for chalcedony. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 60) [Chalcedony is a variety of quartz. It occurs naturally in a number of different colors.]

CHAMPAINE

I will ask Lord Codex about the current status of the division variously called "champaine" (Parker) and "urdy" (Boutell). (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 10) [The query was apparently to determine whether or not the line of partition is in period. I have found no record of a response.]

CHANGE OF DEVICE

It has been pointed out to me that once a King has granted arms to a subject, they cannot be altered at will. Accordingly, when anyone wishes to alter such arms, it will be necessary to obtain royal permission in writing. This should be from the king currently on the throne, rather than from the former king who originally granted the arms. Also, it is not necessary for the details of the alteration to be approved by the king; he simply gives leave to the College to make an alteration ... Any new scroll of arms desired by the applicant will have to be negotiated with the local College of Scribes. In such a case, the royal signature would of course be that of the former king, and the date of issuance would be unchanged ... and of course none of this is necessary in the case of a change in the device of a non-armigerous person. (KFW, 10 Apr 78 [19], p. 1)

Since the College of Heralds of [kingdom] chose name and device for her, she may change either or both without charge if she desires. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 10)

CHECKY

Checky follows the laws of tincture. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15)

CHEVRON

[Chevronelly sans nombre argent and gules.] The highest number Parker mentions for a field chevronelly is seven. This is seventeen, counting partials; hence "sans nombre." (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 3) [Sans nombre is French for "without number."]

CHIEF

Because a chief as the only difference implies a family connection, your arms are not sufficiently different from these and others. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 68)

CHIMERA

The classical chimaera has the head of a lion, the body of a goat (with the goat's head rising out of the middle of the back, whereas the lion head is attached to the shoulders in the normal manner), and the tail of a serpent, or sometimes a tail which is a serpent. Your chimaera appears to have a two-headed lion's body, the dexter head that of a lion and the sinister that of a goat, and a tail which is a serpent. Can you provide documentation for this as an "oriental" chimera? Or would you prefer to use the classical model? In the latter case, the beast should be passant or otherwise seen from the site, so as to display its interesting anatomy. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], pp. 8-9) [Descriptions of the chimera vary from one source to the next. Of the dozen or so definitions I consulted, no two were identical in all particulars.]

CHOUGH

The chough is heraldically defined and genus and species can be omitted. It resembles a crow but has red beak and feet. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 7)

CINQUEDEA

A cinquedea is a large dagger "five fingers broad," sixteenth century Italian. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 6)

CLARICORD

Clarion being not a trumpet but a claricord, sufflue, or organ-rest. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 2)

CLARION

Clarion being not a trumpet but a claricord, sufflue, or organ-rest. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 2)

CLOCKWISE

Deasil means clockwise, or sunwise. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 7)

CLYDESDALE

The Clydesdale horse is in period. (KFW, 21 Apr 76 [4], p. 2)

The Clydesdale is a recent version of the rough-legged draft horse. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 5)

COLLAR

You can't have a collar if the head is cabossed; there's no neck to hang it from. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 63)

COLUMN

Corinthian columns are forbidden, so also other classic orders. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 8) [The classical orders (styles) of architecture are Corinthian, Doric, and Ionic, to which the Romans added Tuscan and Composite.]

COMET

A comet can't be a gurges. (KFW, 09 Jun 77 [13], p. 2)

COMPASS

The arc-shaped piece is only found on cheap compasses; see the drawing for Der Astronomus in Amman's Book of Trades (p. 21, Dover ed.); also Parker p. 131. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 4) [The reference is to a drawing compass.]

COMPASS ROSE

A compass-rose is probably all right ... but what you have here is much too complex for any heraldic charge of our period. Please simplify. According to THE AMERICAN PRACTICAL NAVIGATOR (Nat[h]aniel Bowditch, 1966 et. p. 23), a compass rose of twelve points was common usage in the Middle Ages and ancient documents testify to wind roses of four to twelve winds. If you want more than twelve you will have to provide documentary proof. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 59)

COMPASS STAR

We have already passed several "compass-stars," a term invented for the very common Society charge of "a mullet of four greater and four lesser points." (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 59)

COMPLEXITY

Much too busy. Remember, Society arms are supposed to be recognizable across a tourney field. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 12)

This is so busy as to defeat the purpose of heraldry. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21],

Unless there is a very good reason we dislike tertiary charges, as they are too small to see from a distance. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 60)

Generally, these arms are too crowded; medieval heraldry is simple and easily recognizable. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 68)

COMPONY

"Counter compony" is "compony of two rows," usually used of bordures. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 35)

CONFLICT

Device and one of the badges probably conflict with an early Curtiss-Wright patent. (UN, 30 Jan 76 [2], p. 7)

He [Lord Codex] has also pointed out that normally the heralds of each nation are not concerned with similarities to arms registered in another nation; indeed, there are constant duplications between Scotland and England. Thus it is not necessary to consult Rietstaap; we will ignore Continental heraldry altogether. (KFW, 10 Jan 78 [17], p. 1)

In the matter of members who disappear: The majority opinion is that their devices should be protected fully, and if they cannot be found to give consent to a device that may slightly infringe their own, we should assume that consent has been refused. (KFW, 15 Nov 78 [22], p. 3)

We all recognize that beautiful piece of jewelry; there are people making a living out of selling reproductions of it; in some senses it is copyright and in others it is in the public domain, and you cannot register it. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 70)

see also NAME - CONFLICT

CONTRAST

The blue [charge], though technically color on fur is admissible, vanishes against the black background of the pean. Try again. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 63)

Even by calling it "proper" you can't put green on blue and black; IT VANISHES FROM SIGHT, which is what the laws of tincture are all about. (KFW. 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

A death's head is by default argent. If you are trying for the natural yellowish ivory of minimally weathered bone, this is too close to your field or. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 69)

A lion proper is tawny, and will not show up on a field or. There is no brown lion such as appears on the emblazon. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 79)

CONTREVOIDED

"Contrevoided" means the arms of the cross are voided and the center is solid. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 7)

COSTED

Codex would rather we used "cotised" than "costed," though for a bend the latter term is technically correct. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 3)

COTISE

Codex would rather we used "cotised" than "costed," though for a bend the latter term is technically correct. (POW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 3)

COUNTER

"Countervolant" means "volant to sinister." (See "Counter" in Parker for examples such as counter-rampant.) (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 6)

COWARD

"Sufflexed" means "bent under." If it were "coward" the tail would be between the legs. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 10)

CREATIVE HERALDRY

We hereby define the riven star as that which you will find in the accompanying picture. To define it is one Niflheim of a lot simpler than to blazon it. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 36) [In Norse mythology, Niflheim was the lowest region of the underworld, ruled by Hel, goddess of the dead.]

[Cross of Samildanach.] The blazon submitted was incomprehensible to anyone who had not seen the emblazon, so when we could not describe it we named it. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 38)

Manticores have no wings. If you want a manticore, you may have one. If you want a winged manticore, we can enter a new category of monster. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 74)

CRESCENT

Victorian whimsy strikes again. We to not use crescent moons with faces. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 7)

A crescent moon must be blazoned as an increscent or a decrescent repenting on its phase, and does not show a face. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 70)

CROSS

[Cross griffee-de-loup.] Griffee-de-loup means "wolf-clawed." (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 9)

The cross of Jerusalem may be drawn with the plain crosslets inside or outside the cross potent, but they should not touch its arms ... With the arms touching ... the design is unclear and likely to be confusing at even a short distance. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 7)

"Contrevoided" means the arms of the cross are voided and the center is solid (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 7)

The patriarchal cross does not imply he has that rank. The only such cross we ever forbade for that reason is the Papal. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 8)

A Cross of Jerusalem in the S.C.A is a cross potent between four crosslets. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 16)

[Cross of Coldharbour.] This is a cross throughout, conjoined with an annulet centered thereon. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 23)

[Cross of Samildanach.] The blazon submitted was incomprehensible to anyone who had not seen the emblazon, so when we could not describe it we named it. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 38)

There are numerous versions of the Cross of Jerusalem. This is not any of them. Crosslets do not touch the cross potent. Blazon "a cross potent between four crosslets" or whichever other you want. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 73)

CROWN

Brigantia is right; "dancetty" is not the right term for the crown. (KFW, 17 Dec 76 [12], p. 1) [It was blazoned as "a crown of three points" instead.]

Crowns are at the disposal of Kingdoms and Principalities. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 18)

Crowns; sun disks, and so on are reserved to royal arms. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 62)

CUP

The cup and serpent are a symbol of pharmacy. (KFW, 09 Jun 77 [13], p. 2) [The combination, known as a Bowl of Hygeia, is therefore reserved.]

CURIOSITY

[A cauldron and a domestic cat in its curiosity.] That is, the cat is standing on its hindpaws, its forepaws on the rim of the cauldron, and is peering in. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 6)

CURULE

A curule chair is a kind of folding camp-stool, having curved legs and no sides or back Its use was a mark of great distinction. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 3)

Please remember that curule is an adjectives It can also refer to a team of horses, a city official, etc. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 5)

CYMBAL

A dumbeg is a drum, zils are finger cymbals, both used by belly dancers. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 3)

DANCETTY

Brigantia is right; "dancetty" is not the right term for the crown. (KFW, 17 Dec 76 [12], p. 1) [It was blazoned as "a crown of three points" instead.]

Dancetty has three points. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 2)

DEASIL

Deasil means clockwise, or sunwise. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 7)

DEATH'S HEAD

A death's head is by default urgent. If you are trying for the natural yellowish ivory of minimally weathered bone, this is too close to your field or. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 69)

DEBRUISED

Rewrite your blazon so as to avoid the term "debruised", which is properly used for animals; "surmounted" for non-animals. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 64)

DEER

A hart is a male red deer over five years old. Appropriately branched antlers should be shown to identify it. The animal shown here has no antlers, and would have to be blazoned a hind (female red deer). (KFW, 20 Nov 78 [23], p. 2)

DELINEATION

Artistic license allows delineation of the mane in or and face in sable. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 39) [The delineation was therefore not blazoned.]

DEMON

[Horned demon's head.] It's the famous grotesque from Notre-Dame, sometimes incorrectly called a gargoyle. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 4)

DETAIL

"All this orbed, langued, crined, armed or whatever incidental, only makes 1/2 of a point of difference COMBINED." [Codex] (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15)

The conclave decided that since this is a badge the difference in gender and markings of the animals is sufficient. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 4)

DIAPERING

The bordure was submitted "of Celtic knotwork", which isn't heraldry. But she may diaper the bordure in any way that pleases her (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 7)

DIFFERENCE

"All this orbed, langued, crined, armed or whatever incidental, only makes 1/2 of a point of difference COMBINED." [Codex] (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 15)

The conclave decided that since this is a badge the difference in gender and markings of the animals is sufficient. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 4)

Because a chief as the only difference implies a family connection, your arms are not sufficiently different from these and others. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 68)

see also CONFLICT

DIMIDIATION

I know of no historic example of quarterly dimidiation, and this submission shows how undesirable it is. In any case dimidiation is a combination of two separate coats. In the SCA this would be permitted to husband and wife, or to their children (with marks of cadency), after both have registered separate devices. Individuals may not use marshalling otherwise. (KFW, 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 7)

This is clearly two coats dimidiated. Start over. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 9)

DISMEMBERED

Inform him that there is not as extensive and multiple dismemberment as is shown on the emblazon. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 25)

DOCUMENTATION

You will have to send me photographs of these weapons before I believe them. (Lord Breakstone's lady says that they would make attractive Dungeon artifacts. So they would, but we aren't playing Dungeons and Dragons, we're playing at being lords and ladies. (KFW, 20 Aug 76 [7], p. 5)

Resubmit with a brief description, and let the other heralds in on it. (Thank you for sending me the documentation.) (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 12)

I will not pass or otherwise put my name to anything I don't understand. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 7)

We need documentation on the [charge]. I can recognize the general cultural and artistic style but I need something more specific: a reference on exactly where the original is found; a photograph would be nice. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 8)

They have provided pages of documentation for the yale, which otherwise we would be inclined to consider out of period. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 20)

We recommend Jost Amman's BOOK OF TRADES (available from Dover Paperbacks) ... Generally speaking, any piece of technology you cannot find in Amman is probably out of period! (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 71)

DOG

Celtic hounds [proper] are brown. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 1) [A Celtic hound appears to be one drawn with stylization of the sort fount in Celtic manuscripts.]

DOLPHIN

Please clarify whether you want a heraldic or a natural dolphin; the heraldic dolphin is a prickly beast looking rather like a rock cod with delusions of grandeur. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 69)

DOOR

"Port" means "door." (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 3)

DRAGON

"Webbed" refers to the [tincture of the] webs between the toes. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 2)

Serpents do not have legs; shall I blazon this a "dragon serpentine"? (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 10)

The south end of a dragon going north is not a suitable subject for heraldry. You could have a dragon's tail emerging from a cave or from behind a rock ... or a dragon's tail couped and served on a platter for Twelfth Night. But not a dragon's fundament escaping over a wall. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 9)

DRUM

A dumbeg is a drum, zils are finger cymbals, both used by belly dancers. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 3)

A dumbec is a drum used in Middle Eastern music; it can be made of all kinds of materials and cannot be "proper." (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 7)

DUMBEC

see DRUM

DUMBEG

see DRUM

EAGLE

Even with three heads that is much too much like the Imperial Eagle. A triple-headed eagle was reserved for the Holy Roman Emperor. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 63) [The first sentence suggests that the word "triple" in the second sentence is a mistake for "double."]

ELF-BOLT

An elf-bolt is a flint arrowhead, concerning which there were numerous superstitions. (KFW, 11 Nov 77 [16], p. 8) [The charge was allowed.]

EMBATTLED

A fess, if embattled, is embattled on both sides. (KFW, 20 Nov 78 [23], p. 3)

EMMANCHE

Emmanche is not English heraldry (cf. Parker). (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

ENDORSE

The width of an endorse is the same at top and bottom. Endorses are normally borne in pairs. (KFW, 20 Aug 76 [7], p. 5)

You can't have a single endorse; see Parker's GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN HERALDRY under Endorse and Cottice. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 65)

ENFIELD

Putting wings on an enfield does not make it legal. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 10)

ENGLISH HERALDRY

We don't use quarterly in equerre ... I doubt if it's English heraldry; it certainly isn't in Parker's glossary. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 8) [It's Continental. See Woodward's A Treatise on Heraldry, p. 82 and plate V, fig. 11.]

The nesselblatt (nettle-leaf) is a charge, not a bordure, and in any case it's German heraldry, not English. (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 7)

We use English heraldry because we speak English. I do not claim that ours is in any way superior to other systems of heraldry. It is merely that we can research it most easily. We do need to stick to a single system; we would be far too confused if we tried to use them all at once. (KFW, 15 Nov 78 [22], p. 2)

Emmanche is not English heraldry (cf. Parker). (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

EQUERRE

We don't use quarterly in equerre ... I doubt if it's English heraldry; it certainly isn't in Parker's glossary. (KFW, 29 Oct 76 [9], p. 8) [It's Continental. See Woodward's A Treatise on Heraldry, p. 82 and plate V, fig. 11.]

ERECT

[Sea lion erect.] Only four-legged creatures may be "rampant. " (KFW, 17 Aug 78 [21], p. 2)

ERMINE

We will henceforth use the names ermines (sable, spotted urgent), erminois (or, spotted sable) and pean (sable, spotted or). (KFW, 10 Jan 78 [17], p. 3) [The term ermines was later abandoned for the established SCA usage counter-ermine.]

To qualify as counter-ermine, the emblazon should have more than the six tails shown. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], pp. 30-31)

ESCUTCHEON

see SHIELDS ON SHIELDS

EXCEPTION

This lady is recovering from a serious gunshot wound. Her application was lost in transit a year ago, and has not appeared on a letter of intent. I am passing it provisionally, after consulting Lord Clarion, since her friends believe that a rapid acceptance will aid her recovery. (W. 11 Aug 77 [14], p. 5)

FATIMA

"Dea" means Goddess. The hand of Fatima with an eye symbolizes All-seeing God. Taken together they are inadmissible. Change one or the other. (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 10)

FESS

A fess, if embattled, is embattled on both sides. (KFW, 20 Nov 78 [23], p. 3)

FIMBRIATION

The device is iffy the use of fimbriation to avoid metal on metal is legal, but not really advisable; the device will be indistinguishable at a dozen paces, which is why the rule of tincture was formulated. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 60)

FLAG

Flags follow the rules for arms, not badges, so no letters are allowed. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 67)

FLAUNCHES

This was submitted as "... four flaunches ..." Flaunches, however, represent the sides (flanks) of an undergarment showing beneath a sideless surcoat. Since the shape as drawn suggests a stylized hide, I am using that as the name of the main charge. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 6)

Flaunches are always borne in pairs. (KFW, 18 Aug 77 [15], p. 2)

The flaunches must be of one color, not two. They represent "flanks," that is, sides, of an under-robe which is seen through the openings of an open-sided surcote. (KFW, 20 Nov 78 [23], p. 3)

FOOT

"Member" means its foot. (KFW, 10 Mar 78 [18], p. 4)

The artist may be instructed to show the foot raised, but it would not be a point of difference and is omitted from the blazon. Besides, an animate charge should be "in the noblest attitude," not limping! (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 28)

Counter-vair is out of period (first attested 1766, O.E.D.). (KFW, 16 Jun 76 [6], p. 11)

Vair must be composed of one metal and one color. (KFW, 22 Oct 76 [8], p. 10)

We will henceforth use the names ermines (sable, spotted argent), erminois (or, spotted sable) and pean (sable, spotted or). (KFW, 10 Jan 78 [17], p. 3) [The term ermines was later abandoned for the established SCA usage counter-ermine.]

To qualify as counter-ermine, the emblazon should have more than the six tails shown. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], pp. 30-31)

The blue [charge], though technically color on fur is admissible, vanishes against the black background of the pean. Try again. (KFW, 30 Jun 79 [25], p. 63)

FUSILY

[Semy of fusils.] The blazon has been altered from "fusily," which signifies a tesselation, analogous to "checky." (KFW, 12 Dec 75 [1], p. 3)



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