Collected Precedents of the S.C.A.: Designations


Name Precedents: Designations


Laurel: Date: (year.month.date) Precedent:
 
General
François la Flamme 2003.10 [Household name House of the Black Unicorn] Submitted as Brotherhood of the Black Unicorn, the submitter justified the substantive part of the name on the basis of inn-sign names and the designator on the basis of religious groups.

However, RfS III.2.b.iv "Household Names" states that "Household names must follow the patterns of period names of organized groups of people." Period names for different types of organized groups of people followed different patterns. Guild names, inn names, clan names, et cetera, were all formed differently. The patterns for names based on religious groups (and thus appropriate for use with the designator Brotherhood) do not include names of the form [color] + [charge]. Names based on the name of an inn include names of the form [color] + [charge], but are not found using the designator Brotherhood. The designator used with a household name must be compatible with the construction pattern used for the entire household name. Therefore, while both Brotherhood and Black Unicorn are registerable, they are not registerable in combination.

We have changed the designator in this name to House, a designator compatible with the inn-sign model used in the rest of this household name, in order to register this name. [Bjarki Hvítabjarnarson, 10/2003, A-Artemisia]

François la Flamme 2003.07 The submitted name West Dragonshire follows the long accepted practice of appending the designator -shire to the end of an English placename rather than including it as a separate element Shire of.

While precedent has not been clear on this topic, designators cannot be indivisible from the rest of the branch name. Because the status of the group may change over time (from a shire to a barony, et cetera), the designators must be able to change appropriately (from Shire to Barony, et cetera). Such has been the case when Wastekeepshire became the Barony of Wastekeep in April 1986, and when Peregrineshire became the Canton of Peregrine in May 1983. Therefore, the validity of a branch name must be considered independent from the designator. Removing the designator in the submitted West Dragonshire leaves West Dragon.

Dragon- has been ruled SCA compatible for use in a placename:

No evidence was supplied that Dragon- was a period element in placenames. Drakehurst would be significantly more authentic. Nevertheless, a cursory search found over 30 SCA names with Dragon-<X> as locatives. Therefore Dragonhurst is SCA compatible. [Anne of Dragonhurst, 02/00, A-Middle]

This allows the use of Dragon- as the first part of a placename in English. It does not allow Dragon as a placename by itself.

Adding a toponymic element (such as -ton, -ley, et cetera) to Dragon- would address this issue. For example, the SCA compatible ruling mentioned above would support a placename of Dragonton. Using this name as a basis, the submitter's documentation would support a place named West Dragonton.

However, no documentation was presented and none was found that the name of an English shire would be formed by adding West to the name of an existing shire. While evidence has been found of towns whose names are based on the names of other towns in the forms North [town name], West [town name], etc., no evidence was found to support similar constructions for English shire names.

Therefore, if a toponymic element is added to Dragon- in this name (we will use -ton for these examples, though other toponymics are certainly valid), then this name would be registerable as Shire of West Dragon[toponymic element] (for example: Shire of West Dragonton) or as Dragon[toponymic element]shire (for example: Dragontonshire) or as Shire of Dragon[toponymic element] (for example: Shire of Dragonton). [West Dragonshire, 07/2003 LoAR, R-Drachenwald]

François la Flamme 2003.06 [Household name Dom Kazimira] This submission was documented as the Russian translation of the phrase House of Kazimir. However, no evidence was presented that Dom was a term used to describe a group of people in period Russia. In addition, no evidence was presented as to how household names in Russian might be formed from personal names; it is unclear whether they would use the given name, a patronymic form, a byname, or some other kind of element. Barring such evidence, this household name cannot be registered. [Dmitri Kazimirovich and Tatiana Gordeevna Kazimirova, 06/2003 LoAR, R-Æthelmearc]
François la Flamme 2003.05 [Order of the Hospitallers of Albion] Submitted as Hospitallers of Albion, this order name lacked a designator, as required by RfS III.2.b. We have added the designator allowed by Kingdom. [Drachenwald, Kingdom of, 05/2003 LoAR, A-Drachenwald]
François la Flamme 2002.11 There was a question raised regarding whether Tir Rígh should be considered a translation for the branch designator Crown Principality. Currently, there are very few translations for branch designators that have been registered and none of these are for groups larger than a shire. Given this historical lack of use of translations for large branch designators (to the point that no lists are available for translations of branch designators), we are unwilling to disallow registration of an otherwise acceptable name at this time. [Tir Rígh, Principality of, 11/2002, A-An Tir]
Jaelle of Armida 1999.06 [Aarnimetsä, Barony of. Order name for Aarnimetsän akatemia] This is being returned for not following our patterns for order name. The name means, in Finnish, Academy of Aarnimetsä, Aarnimetsä being the name of the barony. However as it says in RfS 2.b.ii "Some examples are: the Order of Saint Michael, the Order of Saint Maurice and Saint Lazarus, the Brethren of the Sword, the Order of the Garter, La Toison d'Or (the Order of the Golden Fleece), the Order of the Golden Rose, the Order of the Star, the Order of the Swan, La Orden de la Jara (the Knights of the Tankard), the Order of Lilies." Academy of Aarnimetsä does not follow any of the exemplars. Furthermore, they would not take changes, and all order and awards must contain a designator. RfS 2.b states "Branch names, names of orders and awards, heraldic titles, and household names must consist of a designator that identifies the type of entity and at least one descriptive element. Common designators are Shire, Barony, Guild, House, Order of the, and Herald. ". (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR June 1999, p. 8)
Jaelle of Armida 1999.06 [Aarnimetsä, Barony of. Order name for Aarnimetsän kaarti] This is being returned for not following our patterns for order name. The name means, in Finnish, Guard of Aarnimetsä, Aarnimetsä being the name of the barony. However as it says in RfS 2.b.ii "Some examples are: the Order of Saint Michael, the Order of Saint Maurice and Saint Lazarus, the Brethren of the Sword, the Order of the Garter, La Toison d'Or (the Order of the Golden Fleece), the Order of the Golden Rose, the Order of the Star, the Order of the Swan, La Orden de la Jara (the Knights of the Tankard), the Order of Lilies." Academy of Aarnimetsä does not follow any of the exemplars. Furthermore, they would not take changes, and all order and awards must contain a designator. RfS 2.b states "Branch names, names of orders and awards, heraldic titles, and household names must consist of a designator that identifies the type of entity and at least one descriptive element. Common designators are Shire, Barony, Guild, House, Order of the, and Herald. ". (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR June 1999, p. 8)
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1992.10 The word chosen for "shelter", díon, is an abstract noun, not a concrete noun. (As Lady Harpy put it, díon means "shelter" in the sense of "I was protected from the attacking dog by the shelter of the blackberries.") Consequently, we cannot consider Díon to be a group designation, as required by Rule III.1.b; (Una of Blackberry Hollow, October, 1992, pg. 33)
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1992.11 [Golden Swarm] The name lacks a designator (such as House, Guild, or Company), as required by Rule III.1.b. I don't believe Swarm can be used to refer to a group of humans. (Golden Swarm (Aethelwyn Aethelredson), November, 1992, pg. 17)
 
Academy
François la Flamme 2003.02 [Household name Academia Sancti Thomae Aquini] [...] There was some question whether an institution of learning would have used the term schuola in its formal name in the submitter's desired time and culture. Therefore, we have changed Schuola to Academia and registered this name in a fully Latin form to meet the submitter's request for authenticity. [Jason of An Tir, 02/2003 LoAR, A-An Tir]
François la Flamme 2002.08 [Academy of the Falcon and Sword] Submitted as Academy of the Falcon and the Sword, documented examples of sign names combining two elements in this manner do not include an article before the second element. Therefore, we have removed the from before the word Sword.

Note: Academy is a household designator that may be used in household names registered to either individuals or branches. [Galen Storm, 08/2002, A-Atlantia]

 
-bruder
François la Flamme 2003.04 [Household name Der Drachenbrüder] This household name is being returned for multiple issues.

The LoI stated that the submitter believed that Der Drachenbrüder meant 'The Fraternity/Brotherhood of the Dragon'. In this name, the only element that could be considered a designator would be the element -brüder 'fraternity/brotherhood'. As designators are transparent for conflict purposes, this name would conflict with Dragon Principal Herald (registered in December 1975 to the Middle). The designator in this heraldic title is Principal Herald. The substantive portions of these names are Drachen- and Dragon respectively, and there is insufficient difference in both look and sound between these two elements.

The LoI provided documentation for two period fraternities: Marxbruder 'Brotherhood/Fraternity of [St.] Mark' and Lux Bruder 'Brotherhood/Fraternity of [St.] Luke'. This documentation supports a construction combining a saint's name with the element -bruder or Bruder. No documentation was provided and none was found to support using 'dragon' in place of a saint's name in this construction. Lacking such evidence, this household name is not registerable. [Thorgrimr inn kyrri, 04/2003 LoAR, R-Atlantia]

 
Canton
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.02 While the forms did not include the designator Canton, the petition did. The element -port in this case can be a designator (although Corpora (V.C) then requires the group to be a military institution), or it can be a more integral part of the name similar to -ton. [Canton of Kennasport, 02/00, R-Middle]
 
Castle
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2001.03 [Castle Newmarch] ... Castle is a valid household designator... [Gryffri de Newmarch, 03/01, A-Meridies]
 
Chapel, Capella
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.09 [Capella Sancti Thomi et Sanctae Mariae Magdalenae] The argument was made in commentary that a chapel is a building, not a group of people, and that it should therefore not qualify as an alternative for household. However, the Oxford English Dictionary lists, among other meanings of the word Chapel,
7. A choir or body of singers attached to a chapel (usually of a king or prince); 'now extended to mean the choir or the orchestra, or both, of a church or chapel, or other musical establishment sacred or secular' (Grove Dict. Music). Often in French form chapelle, Ger. kapelle, or It. capella.
The earliest dated example given for this meaning of chapel is from 1420. This leads us to believe the term can be used for organized groups of people and thus as an alternative for household. [Simon Justus, 09/00, A-Middle]
 
Chateau
Jaelle of Armida 1998.04 [Shire of Chateau de Normandy] This combines two designators, Shire and Chateau. Barring documentation of such a combination, it must be returned. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR April 1998, p. 20)
 
Clan
François la Flamme 2002.05 [Bear Clan] A question was raised during commentary regarding whether Bear Clan was registerable using the model of a Scottish clan as cited in the Rules for Submission (RfS III.2.b.iv). In this model, Clan precedes the clan name (Clan [Surname]) rather than follows it ([Surname] Clan). Also, clan is a Scots word derived from the Gaelic word clann, meaning 'children'. (Scots is a language closely related to English.) The name of the clan is a Scots surname. While some of these surnames are also found in English, not all English surnames are found in Scots. Therefore, to comply with RfS III.1.a, which requires linguistic consistency within a name phrase, the clan name must be documented as a Scots surname. Occasionally, a locative may be included in the clan name, taking the form Clan [Surname] of [Location].

There is also a clan name model found in Ireland. However, in Ireland, the model that includes the word Clann in Gaelic (Clan in Anglicized Irish) is based on a given name found in Gaelic. Examples are found that include both Gaelic given names and Anglo-Norman given names that migrated into Gaelic.

The Rules for Submission were most recently updated on July 20, 2001. Previous to that, the most recent update was November 1, 1995. All household names, except one, registered since that date that use some form of clan as a designator follow either the Scottish or Irish models described above. The single exception is Clann an Chullaich Bhain (registered February 1996) which was submitted as a "sign name" meaning 'the white boar'. As our knowledge of naming practices has expanded, doubt has been shed on the theory that Scottish or Irish clan names would be based on the English sign name model. Lacking evidence of such a construction, they are no longer registerable. Several registrations of clan names were specifically mentioned during commentary. Clan Baldwin (registered June 1996) follows the Scottish model since Baldwin is a plausible Scots surname. (Black, s.n. Baldwin, gives only dated examples of forms of Baldwin as a given name, but it could easily have followed the pattern of other Anglo-Norman given names that became surnames in Scotland.) Clan Hubert (registered February 1999) follows the Irish model since Hubert was among the Anglo-Norman given names that appear in Ireland. Clan Gara (registered September 1996) and Clan Gillemore (registered March 1998) also follow the Irish model as Gara and Gillemore are Anglicized forms of the Irish Gaelic masculine given names Gadra and Gilla Muire.

Since Bear Clan does not follow either the Scottish clan name model or the Irish clan name model, it is not registerable as either a Scottish or an Irish clan name. [Erik the Bear, 05/2002, R-Atlantia]

 
Clann
François la Flamme 2002.05 [Bear Clan] A question was raised during commentary regarding whether Bear Clan was registerable using the model of a Scottish clan as cited in the Rules for Submission (RfS III.2.b.iv). In this model, Clan precedes the clan name (Clan [Surname]) rather than follows it ([Surname] Clan). Also, clan is a Scots word derived from the Gaelic word clann, meaning 'children'. (Scots is a language closely related to English.) The name of the clan is a Scots surname. While some of these surnames are also found in English, not all English surnames are found in Scots. Therefore, to comply with RfS III.1.a, which requires linguistic consistency within a name phrase, the clan name must be documented as a Scots surname. Occasionally, a locative may be included in the clan name, taking the form Clan [Surname] of [Location].

There is also a clan name model found in Ireland. However, in Ireland, the model that includes the word Clann in Gaelic (Clan in Anglicized Irish) is based on a given name found in Gaelic. Examples are found that include both Gaelic given names and Anglo-Norman given names that migrated into Gaelic.

The Rules for Submission were most recently updated on July 20, 2001. Previous to that, the most recent update was November 1, 1995. All household names, except one, registered since that date that use some form of clan as a designator follow either the Scottish or Irish models described above. The single exception is Clann an Chullaich Bhain (registered February 1996) which was submitted as a "sign name" meaning 'the white boar'. As our knowledge of naming practices has expanded, doubt has been shed on the theory that Scottish or Irish clan names would be based on the English sign name model. Lacking evidence of such a construction, they are no longer registerable. Several registrations of clan names were specifically mentioned during commentary. Clan Baldwin (registered June 1996) follows the Scottish model since Baldwin is a plausible Scots surname. (Black, s.n. Baldwin, gives only dated examples of forms of Baldwin as a given name, but it could easily have followed the pattern of other Anglo-Norman given names that became surnames in Scotland.) Clan Hubert (registered February 1999) follows the Irish model since Hubert was among the Anglo-Norman given names that appear in Ireland. Clan Gara (registered September 1996) and Clan Gillemore (registered March 1998) also follow the Irish model as Gara and Gillemore are Anglicized forms of the Irish Gaelic masculine given names Gadra and Gilla Muire.

Since Bear Clan does not follow either the Scottish clan name model or the Irish clan name model, it is not registerable as either a Scottish or an Irish clan name. [Erik the Bear, 05/2002, R-Atlantia]

 
Collegium
Jaelle of Armida 1999.02 [Scola Metallorum, College of] Submitted as Scola Metallorum, the group wanted to use Scola as an alternative for College. We are unwilling to declare Scola the equivalent of College and thereby reserve its use to official SCA groups, especially in light of the fact that there is already a Latin equivalent, Collegium. Please inform the group that the form Collegium Metallorum would also be acceptable. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR February 1999, p. 8)
 
Companionate
Jaelle of Armida 1997.10 [returning the Companionate of the Pilgrims of Compostela] Taking this at face value, "Companionate" is the designator and "Pilgrims of Compostela" is the substantive portion of the name. This pattern follows no know period exemplars. If we regard both "Companionate" and "Pilgrims" to be designators then there is the problem of using two designators (a possibility which the RfS don't seem to take into account, and which at the least requires some justification). (Meridies, Kingdom of, 10/97 p. 12)
 
Companions
François la Flamme 2003.08 [Order name Order of the Seraph] Submitted as Companions of the Seraph, the designator Companions does not clearly indicate that an entity is an order. As the last registration of Companions as a designator was in 1981, Companions is not SCA-compatible as a designator. We have changed the designator to Order in order to register this name.

This ruling only affects the registerability of Companions as a designator. Members of an order may be described as Companions of that order. [Angels, Barony of the, 08/2003 LoAR, A-Caid]

 
Company
Elsbeth Anne Roth 1999.10 Submitted as an order name, Company is a designator that applies only to household names. [Dun Carraig, Barony of, 10/99, A-Atlantia]
Jaelle of Armida 1998.02 [Axemoor, Barony of. Order name and badge for Company of Hussars of Axemoor] Submitted as an order name for Hussars of Axemoor, it lacked a designator. We have added the designator acceptable to the Baron in order to avoid returning the order name. (Barony of Axemoor, 2/98 p. 5)
 
Consort of Musicke
François la Flamme 2001.11 [Neuschel Consort of Musicke] Documentation included with this submission dates the term Consort of Musicke to 1575. In context in the documentation, this term meets the requirement for a household-that it describe an organized group of people. As such, Consort of Musicke is acceptable as a designator for a household name. Regarding the lingual mix, the designator in a household name may be rendered either in the language appropriate to the submission or in English. Just as House Neuschel is registerable, so Neuschel Consort of Musicke is registerable. [Wolfgang Neuschel der Grau, 11/01, A-Caid]
 
Defenders
François la Flamme 2003.05 [Order of the Defenders of the Citadel] An issue was raised whether Defenders follows the pattern of group names used in historical order names. No evidence was found that Defenders would have been used in a period order name. However, Defender and Defenders have been used so often in awards and order names, including as generic designators, that this term has become part of SCA culture. Therefore, it is reasonable to declare use of Defender and Defenders in an order or award name to be SCA compatible. [Artemisia, Kingdom of, 05/2003, A-Artemisia]
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.06 [Order of the Defender of Darkwater] This conflicts with the already registered names Order of the Defenders of Mons Tonitrus and Order of the Defenders of the West. Also, while such order names have been registered in the past it is not clear that this construction follows real-world examples. [Darkwater, Barony of, 06/00, R-Trimaris]
Elsbeth Anne Roth 1999.11 [Defender of Darkwater] This name has no designator, such as Order or Award. It needs a designator to be registerable, under RfS III.2.b. Note that it is appropriate to name someone the Defender of Darkwater without registering the name; it is a reasonable generic description similar to Champion. [Darkwater, Barony of, 11/99, R-Trimaris]
 
Fähnlein
François la Flamme 2002.10 [Household name Fähnlein Lintwurm]Submitted as Fähnlein Lindwurm, the submitter requested authenticity for German language/culture and allowed minor changes.

Documentation has been presented supporting Fähnlein as a period term for a particular type of German military unit. Given this information, it is acceptable as a household designator.

Currently, we know little about the actual naming of German military units in period. In the case of this submission, Lindwurm was documented as a house name that became a surname. Bahlow (s.n. Lindwurm) lists Lindwurm as a house name and dates Clesel zuo dem Lintworme to 1368 and Nickel Lintwurm to 1429. We are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt and assuming that a German military company could have been referred to by its commander's surname (as was done in other countries). As the dated spellings that were found use t rather than d, we have changed the spelling Lindwurm to Lintwurm to partially meet the submitter's request for authenticity. Lacking more detailed information regarding the naming of German military companies in period, we are unable to confirm that this name is completely authentic for German as requested by the submitter. [Ludwig Grün, 10/2002, A-Meridies]

 
Fortaleza
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1993.06 Fortaleza should be acceptable as an equivalent for the SCA branch classification of "Stronghold." (Fortaleza de la Frontera, June, 1993, pg. 8)
 
Gwely
François la Flamme 2003.08 [Household name Gwely Caradoc] Listed on the LoI as Clann Caradoc, this name was submitted as Clan Caradoc. The LoI stated that "The submitters note that 'If Clan is unacceptable, please change to correct Welsh designator.'"

RfS III.1.a requires linguistic consistency in a name phrase. As a household name is a single name phrase, the entire household name must be in a single language.

As Caradoc is Welsh, it may not be used with Clann, which is Gaelic, or with Clan, which is Scots or Anglicized Irish. Harpy provided information regarding a word in Welsh that has a close meaning to clan:

In my research, the type of name that seems to correspond best to the Gaelic "clan", in the sense of a group of closely-related individuals with mutual legal and economic obligations, uses the element "gwely", which literally means "bed", but in this context means "a group of closely-related individuals who hold land in common (also the land held by such a group)". These group/place names are normally constructed as "gwely <personal name of common ancestor>" where the ancestor may be identified by a given name or a full personal name or much more rarely by some other descriptor.

Some examples of this type of name from the mid 14th century rental in the Black Book of St. Davids include:

gwele Cradoc ap Duryn~
gwele Ieuan ap Kediuor
gwele Gwylbrid'
gwele redwyth'

Harpy explained that the form gwele found in the examples below is a non-standard spelling used in this source, and that the standard spelling for this time period would be gwely. She also provided the correct form of this household name using Gwely as a designator:

Gwely Caradoc (the near descendents of Caradoc who hold land in common, also the land they hold)

As the submitters allow any changes, we have changed this household name to Gwely Caradoc as recommended by Harpy to make this name completely Welsh in order to register this name. [Mat of Forth Castle and Adekin Caradoc, 08/2003 LoAR, A-Caid]

 
Haus
François la Flamme 2003.08 [Household name Haus Tagestërne] As submitted, this household name included no designator, which is required for registration. The LoI noted:

If required, the household indicator Haus may be added to the name (e.g., Tagsternhaus); this follows the naming practices seen in Hoffbrauhaus, a German brewery dated back to 1160 A.D. (http://www.hofbrauhaus-freising.de/).

However, the element -haus in this example is not used in the manner of a designator. Koira explains:

Also, _haus_ in Hofbräuhaus_ is not what we'd call a designator; rather, _Bräuhaus_ is the German word for Brewery, and the entire three-part compound glosses to _Royal Brewery_.

A household name formed from this hypothetical surname Tagestërne would take the form Haus Tagestërne. We have changed this household name to this form in order to register this name. [Edric Longfellow, 08/2003 LoAR, A-Atenveldt]

François la Flamme 2002.06 [Haus Hombaden] Submitted as House Hombaden, the submitter requested authenticity for German. Therefore, we have changed the designator from House to the German form Haus. [Brion Gennadyevich Gorodin, 06/2002, A-Trimaris]
 
Heights, Heyghts
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1992.07 [Wyvern Heyghts] If Heyghts is considered the designator (equivalent to House), then Wyvern is the substantive element here, and this is clear of Wyvernwood and Wyvern Cliff: their substantive elements are wood and Cliff, respectively. If Heyghts is not the designator (i.e. not transparent, but an integral part of the name), this is still clear, for changing the substantive element from Heights to wood or Cliff respectively. (Wyvern Heyghts (Elyramere of Tymbrelyne Heyghts), July, 1992, pg. 5)
 
Hold
François la Flamme 2002.04 [Eveninghold] Since -hold cannot be used as a designator in a branch name or a heraldic title, there is no issue of confusion when it is used as a designator in a household name. It has been registered previously as the designator in a household name. For example, the household name Hasselhold registered in July of 1985 to Joan of Caernarvon uses -hold as the designator. [Ariana Irene de Caro, 04/2002, A-Caid]
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.01 [Thorne House] Conflict with Thornhold, registered to Ciorstan MacAmhlaidh. As hold is the designator, it does not contribute difference. [Yin Mei Li and Marie Lorraine de Montclair, 01/00, R-Artemisia]
 
hus
Shauna of Carrick Point 2004.03 Submitted as House Gunnulf, the submitter requested an Old English designator for House. Siren found a citation from the OED for Aarones hus dated to c. 1000. We have changed this name to the equivalent for Gunnulf: Gunnulfes hus. [Birgir inn Blakki, 03/04, A-Caid]
 
Inn
François la Flamme 2002.02 [Inn of the Weeping Unicorn] Inn is an acceptable designator for a household name. [Kathryn atte Unicorn, 02/02, A-Ansteorra]
 
Keep
François la Flamme 2002.08 [House Talbots Keep] This household name was submitted as Talbot's Keep and changed to House Talbot's Keep at kingdom to add a designator, as Keep was not thought to be an acceptable designator. However, Keep is an acceptable designator for a household name as noted by Sommelier:

Keep is a valid designator (cf. "[Seeker's Keep] Keep is the household designator here. (Seeker's Keep (Aelfric se Droflic), September, 1992, pg. 1)", registered by Bruce Laurel). However, as such this (Talbot's Keep) would conflict with Talbot Herald, registered to England 08/87. Adding House may clear the conflict.

The conflict called by Sommelier is correct since designators are transparent for conflict purposes. In the form House Talbot's Keep, House is the designator, making this form clear of Talbot Herald (which has Herald as the designator) by the addition of the element Keep. [Connor M'Eleam, 08/2002, A-Æthelmearc]

Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1992.09 [Seeker's Keep] Keep is the household designator here. (Seeker's Keep (Aelfric se Droflic), September, 1992, pg. 1)
 
Kompanie
François la Flamme 2003.06 [Household name Die Roten Dracken Kompanie] Listed on the LoI as Kompanie Röter Drachen, this name was submitted as Rote Drachen. The grammar was corrected at Kingdom and a designator added. The LoI did a good job of communicating the submitter's wishes regarding this name:

He intends this submission for a household fighting unit connected with House Drachenholz, which was registered in Oct. '96. He will allow any changes, but wishes to keep the element Drachen in the name. The meaning is intended to be "Red Dragons".

The elements for this name were documented from a modern German dictionary. The German language has changed over time and not everything in modern German is appropriate for period. Orle provided information regarding a period form of this name:

The idea is plausible as a German house name for registration uses. Kompanie: Brechenmacher page 88 s.n. Kompan gives Middle High German kompān meaning companions or comrades. Röter: Bahlow page 468 s.n. Roth gives der rote czymmerman 1413 as the red carpenter. Drachen: Brechenmacher page 336 s.n. Drachenhand gives Drackenhand from 1367 and s.n. Drackenstein gives Middle High German dracke for dragon.

Die Roten Dracken Kompanie is the closest form I can get.

The change from Rote 'Red' to Roten 'Red' occurs because it is an adjective that modifies a plural noun ('Dragons'). We have changed this name to the form suggested by Orle to correct the grammar and use a construction plausible for period. [Erich von Drachenholz, 06/2003 LoAR, A-Caid]

 
Lance, Lancia
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.01 [La Lancia della Casa Rosatti] We found evidence that "Lance" was a termed used in many places in Europe, including Italy, to describe a very small military group, and that Lancia is a valid Italian term. Therefore we are allowing it as a household designator. It is unclear if such groups had names (beyond the leader), but we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt. [Morgana Elisabetta Rosatti, 07/99, A-Caid]
 
Legion
François la Flamme 2001.10 [Legio Ursi] There was some discussion regarding the use of Legion as an order designator versus as a household designator. The following items containing Legion have been registered:
Legion of the Black Fist is registered to the East (July 1974), but there is no indication in the O & A if it was registered as an order name or a household name. As the East Kingdom OP does not list it as an order, it is almost certainly a household name.

Legion of Athene's Sword was registered as a household name to Rosemounde of Mercia (August 1979)

Legion of Courtesy was registered as an order name to Caid (April 1981).

Legion of Gallantry of the Outlands was registered as an order name to the Outlands (November 1993).
Given that at least two registrations of Legion are in order names, this order name is registerable. [Meridies, Kingdom of, 10/01, A-Meridies]
 
Lyceum
Shauna of Carrick Point 2004.03 This submission asked whether Lyceum was a valid alternate designator for a College. The Lyceum was the proper name of the garden in Athens in which Aristotle taught his philosophy. The word does not appear be have been used as a designator for a school until well after 1600. Barring such evidence, Lyceum cannot be used as a designator in non-personal names, although it could be used as part of the descriptive element of such names. In addition, even if such evidence were available, we are unwilling to declare Lyceum the equivalent of College and thereby reserve its use to official SCA groups, especially in light of the fact that there is already a Latin equivalent, Collegium. [Litoris Longi, Lyceum, 03/04, R-Caid]
 
Order
Jaelle of Armida 1997.02 [Damian von Baden] The Administrative Handbook defines Order Names specifically as "The name of a recognized Society honor, order or award" and goes on to say: "By Corpora such names may only be registered to kingdoms, principalities, baronies or equivalent branches." Therefore we cannot register 'Order' as a designator for a household name to an individual. We have substituted Company as the closest equivalent. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR February 1997, p. 7)
 
Pack
François la Flamme 2002.01 [Greyhound Pack] The first issue is whether Pack is acceptable as a household designator. The documentation provided in the LoI for use of Pack was:
The Oxford English Dictionary, Vol. 9, pg. 39, s.n. pack defines it as a company or set of persons and dates the word packe to 1578. The Middle English Dictionary, Part P.1, Sherman M. Kuhn, ed., published 1981, University of Michigan Press on pg. 560, s.n. pak defines the word as an assemblage of people; a company, band and dates the word pak to 1425 and pack to 1400.
Given this definition, if we register Company and Band as household designators, we should also permit Pack. There are at least forty registrations of household names with the designator Company (not including variant spellings). There are three registrations that include some form of the word Band as the designator: The Blue Band (Fionnbhárr Starfyr of the Isles, October 1996), Drafen War Band (Gregory of York, April 1983), and Warband die Steiner Wache (Canton of Steinsee, April 1997). As Company and Band are registerable as household designators, Pack is as well.

The second issue is whether the combination of elements in this submission is intrusively modern, which has previously been cause for return:
[Artemisia, Principality of. Name for the Artemisian Tank Corps.] The name here is intrusively modern. The fact that the individual elements may be period (though with different meanings than the submitters are desirous of) is overwhelmed by the modern connotations of the phrase. (LoAR 02/91, R-Atenveldt)
Grayhound was used in a period sign name, The Syne of the Grayhound, dated to 1522 on p. 83 (section 1, column 1) of William Jerdan, ed., "The Visit of the Emperor Charles V to England, A.D. 1522", Rutland Papers (Camden Society, 1842). Commenters voiced concern that Greyhound Pack was overly reminiscent of a group of dogs, specifically greyhounds. In the precedent above, a Tank Corps is not a period type of assembled group. The combination of Tank and Corps combined to form what could be viewed as a designator that was certainly not a period concept. In this case, a group of greyhounds is a period concept. Therefore, the secondary meaning of Greyhound Pack falls into the same category as Drew Steele. Both may be considered "joke names", but both are period concepts and so are not excessively obtrusive. Tank Corps falls into the same category as Porsche Audi, which was returned in August of 1992:
The fact that this is a "joke name" is not, in and of itself, a problem. The College has registered a number of names, perfectly period in formation, that embodied humor: Drew Steele, Miles Long, and John of Somme Whyre spring to mind as examples. They may elicit chuckles (or groans) from the listener, but no more. Intrusively modern names grab the listener by the scruff of the neck and haul him, will he or nill he, back into the 20th Century. A name that, by its very presence, destroys any medieval ambience is not a name we should register. (Porsche Audi, Returned, LoAR 08/92, pg. 28)
Therefore, as Pack is a registerable household designator and Greyhound Pack is not obtrusively modern, this household name is registerable. [Elizabeth Curry, 01/02, A-Ansteorra]
 
Port
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.02 While the forms did not include the designator Canton, the petition did. The element -port in this case can be a designator (although Corpora (V.C) then requires the group to be a military institution), or it can be a more integral part of the name similar to -ton. [Canton of Kennasport, 02/00, R-Middle]
 
Scola
Jaelle of Armida 1999.02 [Scola Metallorum, College of] Submitted as Scola Metallorum, the group wanted to use Scola as an alternative for College. We are unwilling to declare Scola the equivalent of College and thereby reserve its use to official SCA groups, especially in light of the fact that there is already a Latin equivalent, Collegium. Please inform the group that the form Collegium Metallorum would also be acceptable. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR February 1999, p. 8)
 
-scir
Elsbeth Anne Roth 2000.05 Submitted as Mædshire , the name changed languages (from Old English to English) within a single word. We have made the name entirely Old English. [Mædscir, 05/00, A-Outlands]
 
Shire
François la Flamme 2003.04 The branch designator in this name is -shire. As with other branches before them, if this shire becomes a barony, their name would become Barony of Benton. [Bentonshire, 04/2003 LoAR, A-Trimaris]
Jaelle of Armida 1998.04 [Shire of Chateau de Normandy] This combines two designators, Shire and Chateau. Barring documentation of such a combination, it must be returned. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR April 1998, p. 20)
 
Teulu (Welsh - meaning "family" or "Warband")
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1993.10 [Household name Teulu Ffynnon Ddu] Lady Harpy has noted that the use of teulu ("family") with a toponymic household name does not fit Welsh name structure. However, teulu also means "warband" which makes the name more plausible. (Giovanni Fontananera, October, 1993, pg. 9)
 
Tower
Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme 1992.09 [Tempest Tower] If Tower is considered the household designator (and therefore transparent with respect to conflict), this conflicts with the Order of the Tempest ...Were we to add a designator (e.g. House Tempest Tower), so that Tower became the substantive element of the name, this would conflict with the Order of the Towers of Dreiburgen ...The designator is transparent; the addition of the branch name is worth no difference, per the ruling on the Golden Swan of Calontir; the only countable difference, under the current Rules, is the addition of the adjective Tempest --- which is insufficient, per Rule V.2. (David van den Storm, September, 1992, pg. 38)
 
-vikinge-lag
François la Flamme 2002.05 [Bear Clan] The submitter requested authenticity for a 10th C Norse Clan and allowed minor changes. The submission form gave the submitted household name as "Bear Clan (Bjarn Aett in Old Norse)". The LoI presented Bear Clan as the submitted household name, based on a Lingua Anglica equivalent of a Norse Bjarn Aett. In order to determine both registerable and authentic forms of this name, there are several steps that need to be addressed:

  • Did "clan" type structures exist in Old Norse culture?
  • If they did exist, what were the names used for these groups?
  • Assuming they existed and we know what the names of these groups were, how would an SCA household name be based on this model?

The vast majority of the documentation for this submission came from two sources: Mark Harrison and Gerry Embleton, Viking Hersir, 793-1066AD, volume 3 of Osprey Military Warrior Series; and Nurmann, Schulze, & Verhülsdonk, The Vikings, "Europa Militaria Special No. 6". These are tertiary sources at best and their purpose is not onomastics. Therefore, they must be used with care when used as documentation for name submissions. A number of Norse sagas were mentioned in the LoI, but no photocopies of any of them were provided. As none of them are included in the Admin Handbook under Appendix H, "Name Books That Do Not Require Photocopies to Laurel", these mentions may not be considered documentation. Additionally, no sections of those sagas were cited with specific references to "Norse clans". Such references would be necessary as part of documentation from these sagas. Viking Hersir (p. 6) defines an aett as an "extended family group". However, no documentation was provided that aett would be included as part of the name of such a family group. The Vikings (p. 53) defines the term Vikinge-lag as "brotherhoods of mercenaries". On the same page, it specifically mentions a particular group whose name includes this term:

Jomsvikinge-lag or Jomsvikings, who were probably established in the fortified camp and harbour of Jomsburg. ... The Jomsvikings were the subject of their own saga, which was written down in Iceland in about 1200. They are also mentioned in other sagas: that of King Olaf Tryggvasson states that hiring them was a question of prestige (although they seem to have been on the losing side in a number of important battles). The brotherhood was fading away by about 1010, and the remnant was destroyed by King Magnus of Norway in 1043.

Based on this example, vikinge-lag (as in Jomsvikinge-lag) is an acceptable designator for an SCA household based on the model of the Jomsvikings. The Lingua Anglica equivalent for this designator would be the suffix -vikings, as in the example Jomsvikings. The submitted documentation implies that Jomsvikinge-lag is a reference to the location Jomsburg. Geirr Bassi (p. 20) lists the descriptive byname Bjarneyja- meaning 'Bear Island-', which documents this location in Old Norse, and so dates it to period. A household name referring to this island, based on the Jomsvikings example, would be Bjarnavikinge-lag in Old Norse. Lingua Anglica equivalents for placenames are based on their English rendering, not on a literal translation of the meaning of the placename. For example, the Lingua Anglica form of Tokyo (which means 'Eastern Capital') is Tokyo, not Eastern Capital. The submitter's documentation shows Bjarn Isle as the English form of the place referred to in the byname Bjarneyja-. Therefore, a Lingua Anglica form of Bjarnavikinge-lag would be Bjarnavikings, not Bearvikings or Bear Clan. [Erik the Bear, 05/2002, R-Atlantia]

 
-vikings
François la Flamme 2002.05 [Bear Clan] The submitter requested authenticity for a 10th C Norse Clan and allowed minor changes. The submission form gave the submitted household name as "Bear Clan (Bjarn Aett in Old Norse)". The LoI presented Bear Clan as the submitted household name, based on a Lingua Anglica equivalent of a Norse Bjarn Aett. In order to determine both registerable and authentic forms of this name, there are several steps that need to be addressed:

  • Did "clan" type structures exist in Old Norse culture?
  • If they did exist, what were the names used for these groups?
  • Assuming they existed and we know what the names of these groups were, how would an SCA household name be based on this model?

The vast majority of the documentation for this submission came from two sources: Mark Harrison and Gerry Embleton, Viking Hersir, 793-1066AD, volume 3 of Osprey Military Warrior Series; and Nurmann, Schulze, & Verhülsdonk, The Vikings, "Europa Militaria Special No. 6". These are tertiary sources at best and their purpose is not onomastics. Therefore, they must be used with care when used as documentation for name submissions. A number of Norse sagas were mentioned in the LoI, but no photocopies of any of them were provided. As none of them are included in the Admin Handbook under Appendix H, "Name Books That Do Not Require Photocopies to Laurel", these mentions may not be considered documentation. Additionally, no sections of those sagas were cited with specific references to "Norse clans". Such references would be necessary as part of documentation from these sagas. Viking Hersir (p. 6) defines an aett as an "extended family group". However, no documentation was provided that aett would be included as part of the name of such a family group. The Vikings (p. 53) defines the term Vikinge-lag as "brotherhoods of mercenaries". On the same page, it specifically mentions a particular group whose name includes this term:

Jomsvikinge-lag or Jomsvikings, who were probably established in the fortified camp and harbour of Jomsburg. ... The Jomsvikings were the subject of their own saga, which was written down in Iceland in about 1200. They are also mentioned in other sagas: that of King Olaf Tryggvasson states that hiring them was a question of prestige (although they seem to have been on the losing side in a number of important battles). The brotherhood was fading away by about 1010, and the remnant was destroyed by King Magnus of Norway in 1043.

Based on this example, vikinge-lag (as in Jomsvikinge-lag) is an acceptable designator for an SCA household based on the model of the Jomsvikings. The Lingua Anglica equivalent for this designator would be the suffix -vikings, as in the example Jomsvikings. The submitted documentation implies that Jomsvikinge-lag is a reference to the location Jomsburg. Geirr Bassi (p. 20) lists the descriptive byname Bjarneyja- meaning 'Bear Island-', which documents this location in Old Norse, and so dates it to period. A household name referring to this island, based on the Jomsvikings example, would be Bjarnavikinge-lag in Old Norse. Lingua Anglica equivalents for placenames are based on their English rendering, not on a literal translation of the meaning of the placename. For example, the Lingua Anglica form of Tokyo (which means 'Eastern Capital') is Tokyo, not Eastern Capital. The submitter's documentation shows Bjarn Isle as the English form of the place referred to in the byname Bjarneyja-. Therefore, a Lingua Anglica form of Bjarnavikinge-lag would be Bjarnavikings, not Bearvikings or Bear Clan. [Erik the Bear, 05/2002, R-Atlantia]

 
Village
François la Flamme 2004.03 [Household name Pähkinäsaari, Village of] Additionally, there was considerable discussion whether Village was appropriate as a household designator. The overwhelming consensus was that Village was not an appropriate designator for a household name and, that, if Village should ever be allowed as a designator, that it should be used as an alternate of some level of branch designator. We are, therefore, disallowing use of Village as a designator for a household name. [Petrus Curonus, 03/2004, R-Drachenwald]
 
Multiple Designators
Jaelle of Armida 1998.04 [Shire of Chateau de Normandy] This combines two designators, Shire and Chateau. Barring documentation of such a combination, it must be returned. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR April 1998, p. 20)
Jaelle of Armida 1997.10 [returning the Companionate of the Pilgrims of Compostela] Taking this at face value, "Companionate" is the designator and "Pilgrims of Compostela" is the substantive portion of the name. This pattern follows no know period exemplars. If we regard both "Companionate" and "Pilgrims" to be designators then there is the problem of using two designators (a possibility which the RfS don't seem to take into account, and which at the least requires some justification). (Meridies, Kingdom of, 10/97 p. 12)
 
Status designators not tracked by the College
François la Flamme 2002.11 Submitted as Tir Rioga, Crown Principality of, just as the College does not track the status Incipient, the College also does not track Crown status. Therefore we have dropped the element Crown from this submission. [Tir Rígh, Principality of, 11/2002, A-An Tir]
François la Flamme 2001.10 We have dropped Incipient from the submitted name, as the College does not track this status. [Dragonmarch, Shire of, 10/01, A-Artemisia]