Name Precedents of the SCA College of Arms

The Tenure of Elsbeth Anne Roth


This is a collection of armory precedents from the tenure of Dame Elsbeth Anne Roth as Laurel Queen of Arms from June 1999 through July 2001. Most name rulings from April 2000 were made by Pietari Pentinpoika Uv, Pelican King of Arms. The choice of what was included was the editor's. I have chosen to include some items not generally considered "precedents" as they simply reapply existing precedents. This has been done to (hopefully) make it easier to find a relevant ruling to support things that "everyone knows". The official – and complete – rulings appear in the relevant LoARs and Cover Letters.

I have tried to follow the categories established in the previous precedents. At the end of the precedents, just before the Index, you will find a CONFLICT TABLE that summarizes which names do and do not conflict. The complete rulings are found under CONFLICT - Personal Names. The category COMPATIIBLE (SCA) is organized alphabetcally; all other categories are organized in reverse chronological order.

The texts listed are taken directly from Letters of Acceptance and Return (LoAR), or from the accompanying cover letters (CL). Ellipses (...) are used to indicate deleted text. The source of the text is cited at the end in square parentheses, by submitter’s name, date of the LoAR, and the location within the LoAR. Since so many people are using the electronic versions of the LoAR page numbers are not included. Instead the location is indicated as either acceptances (A) or returns (R) and the kingdom. Those texts excepted from a cover letter are cited by the date of the cover letter and "CL". Editorial comments are in italics within square brackets.

The following heralds are referred to by title in these precedents: al-Jamal (Da'ud ibn Auda), Argent Snail (Jaelle of Armida), Bordure (Mari Elspeth nic Bryan), Brachet (Frederick of Holland), Crescent (Madawc Seumus Caradawg), Kraken (Evan da Collaureo), Metron Ariston (Alisoun MacCoul of Elphane), Orle (Mari Elspeth nic Bryan), Pennon (Cuhelyn Cam vap Morcant), and Pillar (Yin Mei Li).

I wish to thank Jaelle of Armida for her help in proof-reading these pages.

In service,
Jeanne Marie Lacroix
Crescent Principal Herald
mka Martha L. Ranc

Table of Contents (Names)

ADMINSTRATIVE
ARABIC
BRANCH
BYNAMES
CHINESE
COMPATIBLE (Languages)
COMPATIIBLE (SCA)
CONFLICT - Other Names
CONFLICT - Personal Names see also CONFLICT TABLE
DANISH
DEITY
DOCUMENTATION
DUTCH
ENGLISH
FINNISH
FRENCH
GERMAN
GRAMMAR
Heraldic Titles see TITLES
HOUSEHOLD
HUNGARIAN
Iberian see SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
INDIAN
IRISH and SCOTTISH
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
LATIN
LEGAL NAME ALLOWANCE
LOCATIVES and PLACE NAMES
Matronymic see PATRONYMIC and MATRONYMIC
MONGOL
Mundane Name Allowancesee LEGAL NAME ALLOWANCE
NORSE
ORDERS and AWARDS
PATRONYMIC and MATRONYMIC
POLISH
Portuguese see SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
PRESUMPTION
ROMANY
RUSSIAN
Scottish see IRISH and SCOTTISH
SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
SPELLING VARIANTS
TITLES
TURKISH
WEIRDNESS
WELSH

ADMINSITRATIVE

There has recently been some discussion about summarising name documentation in LoI entries. This started with some items which had as the summary a S. Gabriel client number and the names of the people who had worked on it. This caused some relatively harsh criticism.

I'm afraid I have to agree with the critics. Section V.B.2.d of the Administrative Handbook states that a "summary of all supporting evidence provided for the submission must be included on the letter of intent". Now, a "summary" like the one that started this discussion is essentially similar to saying simply "the name is found in Withycombe", without mentioning what Withycombe writes about the name. Both these "summaries" may fulfill the letter of the rule (although even that can be doubted) but they most certainly don't fulfill the intent, which is to make sure that each commenting member of the College can judge the merits of the documentation.

Granted, the Academy of Saint Gabriel has its letters publicly available on the Web. Also, their work is excellent, although the goals are not quite the same as those of the College of Arms. We have recently renewed the agreement whereby the letters of the Academy are accepted as documentation, so that a copy of the letter is sufficient without attaching copies of the sources cited.

All this, however, does not mean that the client number is a sufficient summary of the documentation. Immediate and affordable net access is something we neither do nor can require from commenting members of the College; for instance, the default method for distributing letters is by regular mail and people have to specifically request e-mail commentary. However, this is in fact beside the point: even if everyone had such access we would still need a summary, just like we need a summary when a name is documented from the reference works listed in Appendix H of the Administrative Handbook.

Starting with the July 2000 LoI's we are going to tighten our interpretation of V.B.2.d. so that items that don't have a proper summary of supporting evidence may be returned instead of pended. Blatant cases (such as "<name> is Saint Gabriel Client #1234", or "<name> is Irish" or "<name> is in Withycombe") will be returned unless the College of Arms is able to provide appropriate supporting evidence in its commentary.

If you are unsure about how to properly summarise name documentation, help is available. One possibility, at least for the majority who have e-mail access, is the submission heralds mailing list <SCASubmissionHeralds@onelist.com>; another possibility is to ask either Laurel or myself. Asking for help is no reason to be ashamed; on the contrary, knowing when to ask for help is a major part of the skills needed for any serious office. [04/00, CL]
The submission consists of the given names, in order, of the submitter. As this is one of the possible common use names, we have to return this submission for conflict against the submitter herself, protected under section III.A.9 of the Administrative Handbook. [Mary Amanda, 09/00, R-Artemisia]
[Torna, Canton of] The name is a 14th century form of the name of the real-world town within the Canton. Submitting it for the name of the canton raises the question of how we treat period forms of real-world names of SCA branches.

All in all, we can see three different reasons to return a name of this sort. First, of course, the submitted name may be well enough known to be protected under section III.A.5 of the Administrative Handbook. Thus, for instance, we would not register Birka, either to a group forming near the old site in Sweden or to anyone else. The submitted name does not appear in general encyclopaedias, like the Encyclopaedia Britannica, so by current practice it is not important enough to protect.

Second, the submitted name may be presumptuous. Granted, section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions addresses only names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character. However, it seems appropriate to apply similar standards to personal and non-personal names, and Section VI.4 gives us enough discretion to do so. We would, therefore, return names that unmistakably imply identity with a protected place: for instance, while Londinium does not have its own article in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, London is protected and so registering the Roman name for the city would be presumptuous. In the current case, the modern town does not have its own entry in Britannica and the submission is thus clear on this count as well.

Third, the name may run afoul of section III.A.9 of the Administrative Handbook: No name or device will be registered to a submitter if it is identical to a name or device used by the submitter for purposes of identification outside of a Society context. Thus, in the present case, we would not have registered Tornio or Torneå, those being the currently used names for the town. The submitted name differs from each of these by one syllable, and that is generally considered sufficient difference for personal names. Again, we see no point in treating place names differently. [Torna, Canton of, 06/01, A-Drachenwald]

ARABIC

Both 'Inan and Nihlah are Arabic feminine given names, but there is no evidence that Arabic names were formed of two given names. As they did not use metronymics we could not fix this by making the second name a metronymic. ['Inan Nihlah, 02/00, R-Atenveldt]
The standard transliteration for a byname of an Arab man from Seville would be al-Ishbili; a transliteration using x seems odd. Moreover, al-Ixbily has an i and a y for the same sound. This kind of mixing transliteration systems within a single name has been grounds for a return in the past. [Tahira bint Ibrahim al-Ixbily, 06/00, R-East]
The byname as submitted has serious problems. Nur appears to be a modern given name (in use, for instance, by the current Queen Mother of Jordan), but we could not find evidence of its use as a period byname. Also, Salahuddin Ahmed's A Dictionary of Muslim Names, notes that al-Noor 'the Light' is one of the names of Allah, so the name appears to be presumptuous as well. [Naadira an-Noor, 07/00, R-Meridies]
Submitted as Sabah ibn Qadir al Tar, there was a problem with the byname al Tar. To quote al-Jamal,

Tar, on the other hand, is more problematical. First, "the string" does not follow the pattern of "inanimate objects used as descriptive epithets" cited. These included "the rose", "the raisin", and "the onion". All these are plants or plant parts. The string does not even come close. Second, tar in Arabic is "revenge" or "to fly" (Jaschke's English-Arabic Conversational Dictionary, p. 365). "String" in Persian is risman (Lambton's Persian Vocabulary, p. 367). [Sabah ibn Qadir, 08/00, A-Meridies]
Submitted on the LoI in this form, Cali seems to be a misreading of 'Ali. Even so, the documentation of this name had several problems, and while none of them would in itself be grounds for return, the combination is not registerable.

Using the kunya of one's father as a part of the name, such as Abi 'Ali here, seems to have been rare enough to be considered a weirdness, at least when followed by father's 'ism, in this case Mahmud.

Mahmud itself is a Turkish form of Muhammad, unattested in an Arabic context. While registerable as a part of an Arabic name it is also a weirdness.

Finally, al-Mufassir is essentially an occupational byname. As such it should normally appear either as the final element or right before the final element. Its position at the beginning of the name is a weirdness as well. [Al-Mufassir Ibrahim ibn Abi Cali Mahmud Al-Fatimi, 06/01, R-Ealdoremere]

BRANCH
see also HOUSEHOLD
see also ORDERS and AWARDS

[The Royal University of Meridies] With the exception of the University of Atlantia, registered in 1982, and the Royal University of Ithraall examples of universities are listed as references, not registered names. Therefore, we consider the name to be generic and thus not needing registration. [Meridies, Kingdom of, 01/00, R-Meridies]
While the forms did not include the designator Canton, the petition did. The element -port in this case can be a designator (although Corpora (V.C) then requires the group to be a military institution), or it can be a more integral part of the name similar to -ton. [Canton of Kennasport, 02/00, R-Middle]
[Valley of the Three Walls] The canton justified the construction Valley of the <number> <object> with three examples: Avenue of a Hundred Fountains (in Italy), the Valley of Five Polish Lakes, and the Valley of the Seven Castles (in Luxumbourg). None of the examples, however, are English, one is a street, and the others lack evidence that the names were used for these places in period (given that the places are not in England the period names are definitely not the ones given, although the given forms may be reasonable translations of the period place name). No one else was able to justify Valley as an element in an English place name. [Three Walls, Valley of the, 02/00, R-Middle]
Precedence bars the use of Phoenix in English in SCA group names. The return of the name Coombe Phoenix (March 1998) says -- The evidence that medieval English people were familiar with the legendary phoenix is not relevant unless one can demonstrate a pattern that they named places after legendary monsters. There are cultures where such a pattern might be demonstrated – Germany seems to be fairly prone to such things – but not for England...Therefore, barring evidence that Phoenix was used in English place-names, or at least that mythological animals were used, it cannot be used in English in SCA group names. [Phoenix River, Shire of, 03/00, R-Meridies]
[Dún na Laoich Ór] The name, meaning 'Fortress of the Golden Warriors,' isn't very plausible as a period Scots or Irish place name. Metron Ariston notes that the vast majority of place names beginning in Dun seem to be descriptive in nature, referring to a salient feature of the fort (e.g., its color or location). In a lesser number of cases, the Dun is combined with the name of an individual associated with the fort in history or legend. Relatively rare are names like Dumbarton deriving from groups of people (in this case from Dun Breatuin or Fort of the Britains) and even there we could not find any that do not use a proper noun. [Dún na Laoich Ór, Stronghold of, 05/00, R-An Tir]
Submitted as Mædshire , the name changed languages (from Old English to English) within a single word. We have made the name entirely Old English. [Mædscir, 05/00, A-Outlands]
We have traditionally been somewhat more lenient with names from cultures for which we don't have adequate reference works, and we see no reason to change this policy. However, it does not mean that one can in such cases simply look up random words in a dictionary. At the very least we would expect the submitters to show, first, that the name is grammatically correct and, second, that similar constructions exist somewhere else. These examples of similar names would ideally be from nearby cultures. [Vilku Urvas, Shire of, 09/00, R-Middle]

BYNAMES

There was no documentation indicating that a byname which is possibly justifiable in Middle English could be used for a Latin byname. [Andronicus Ursacor, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
[Corwynn the Lost] Although names of the form X the Lost has been registered in the past, English bynames were not formed from adjectival past participles, and previous Laurels have been returning names for that reason. Da'ud ibn Auda, in the September, 1994 LoAR, wrote: "[Modifying ‘the Brown-eyed'] English bynames were not formed from adjectival past participles. We have substituted the documented form." Given that the name already has a weirdness with the use of Corwynn, which is undocumented but SCA compatible, we are not willing to give the byname the benefit of the doubt. The name must be returned barring documentation that such bynames were found. [Corwynn the Lost, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
The letter of intent justified gamesmen as a "modernized singular form" of gememen. While we do accept modern English forms of bynames through the lingua anglica rule, the documentation given lists the modern form as game-man. [Wolfgang the Gamesman, 11/99, R-Atlantia]
Submitted as Catalina del Sol de Oro, no evidence was given, and none could be found, to show that "of the Golden Sun" is a valid byname in Spanish. The letter of intent suggested that it might be based on an inn name, but we know of no examples of an inn name being used as a byname in Spanish either. [Catalina Oro Sol, 03/00, A-Caid]
The byname was justified based on the existence of the period byname Bygot, by God. As an oath, by golly was not used until the 19th century. The submitter tried to justify the name as a form of by <religious figure>, with Golly as a variant of the religious figure Goliath . We know of no such examples, however, outside of Bygot and it is too much of a stretch to go from by God to by <anything else>. [Olaf Bygolly, 04/00, R-Middle]
As Brachet put it, the byname is in the class, which while unlikely in history, is functionally similar to many earlier period bynames. [Neassa the Obstreperous, 05/00, A-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Morgan Defecta, the byname had a slight problem. The combination of an English or Welsh given name and a Latin descriptive byname is common, and the name as submitted would be registerable. [Morgan Defector, 10/00, A-Caid]
Submitted as William the Admirer, no evidence was given as to why the byname "is an SCA acceptable epithet." As the submitter is mostly interested in the sound of the name, we have changed the byname to a similar-sounding period one found in Reaney and Wilson's Dictionary of English Surnames. [William Addemere, 11/00, A-Lochac]
[the Wanderer] She requested an authentic English name. However, the name is not authentic, as it combines a Gaelic given name with an SCA compatible byname. [Morag the Wanderer, 07/01, A-Artemisia]
... we are reluctantly making the byname the Lost SCA compatible. [Jordan the Lost, 07/01, A-Calontir]

CHINESE

For the registration of this name special thanks go to Pillar for providing extensive documentation, very briefly summarised by herself this way:
Relevent period Chinese given name conventions can be summarized as follows: (1) generally two syllables long, (2) meanings are carried by their written Chinese characters, and (3) female names sometimes refer to flowers.
[Li Ming Fa, 08/00, A-Atenveldt]

COMPATIBLE (Languages)

[Clan Caer Lonn] The name mixes two languages, Welsh (Caer) and Gaelic (Lonn) in one phrase, violating rule III.1.a, "Linguistic Consistency." Brian should also be informed that Clans were named after personal names and nicknames, not places. Lastly we would prefer to see some evidence that "Strong" is a reasonable adjective to apply to keeps. [Brian Brock, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
Most cases of submitted mixed-language names fit into one of four categories. These categories are defined by three criteria: amount of contact, evidence of mixing name elements from the two cultures, and, for those languages where there is evidence, the language/orthography used to write these names.

The first category is when name mixes elements of two cultures that have no contact during our period, for example, China and Scotland. Such names have not been allowed for some time.

The second category is when names mixes elements of two cultures that have significant contact, but we have little or no evidence of mixed names, for example, Scots and Italian. The rule III.1 allows such names although the lack of evidence indicates that these mixed names were exceedingly rare at best.

The third category is when names mix elements of two cultures where we know of many cases of names containing both elements, but the name is found in one orthography (i.e., spelling convention) or the other. Gaelic/Norse name mixtures are an example; a name is recorded using either Gaelic conventions or Norse conventions, but we find no example of both conventions used at the same time when recording names. Such names are also currently registerable even with mixed orthographies.

The fourth category is when names mix elements of two cultures and we know of many case of names containing elements of both cultures and of both spelling conventions; for example, English and Welsh. As these names are historical we allow them even when the two languages are used in the same phrase.

I have no intention of changing which names are registerable. Names in the second category, however, will be considered a "weirdness". Names in the third category will be considered a "weirdness" only when the names use mixed orthographies. Names in the fourth category or names in the third category using a single orthography are fine. [08/99, CL]
Mixing a Dutch name with a Scots name is a "weirdness" but registerable. [Willem MacLear, 08/99, A-Æthelmearc]
An Italian-English name combination is a weirdness (barring evidence of such combinations in period) but acceptable. [Veronica de Holloway, 09/99, A-Artemisia]
While registerable, using an English given name with a Spanish surname is unusual. [Andrew Quintero, 09/99, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Ian MacEanruig, that name contains two weirdnesses: it uses a post-period anglicization of a Gaelic name and mixes Gaelic and English orthographies. [Ian MacHenrik, 10/99, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Duncan Alasdair MacRae, the name had two wierdnesses: mixing the Gaelic and English spellings, and using a double given name in Scots. Therefore, we have Anglicized the entire name. [Duncan Alastair MacRae, 12/99, A-Outlands]
... the mixture of Scots and Gaelic spelling is a weirdness and not returnable... [Elspeth O'Shea, 02/00, A-Middle]
Maura is not justifiable as a period Irish name, as it is a diminutive of Maire, which did not appear in Ireland until the end of our period. There is a possible justification of Maura as a feminization of an 8th c. Frankish male name, but there are other problems. Morlet lists Maura to 739, while MacPharlain is first cited in 1385 (Black, s.n. MacFarlane). Thus the name would have two weirdnesses: the combination of French and Scots Gaelic and temporal incompatibility. [Maura MacPharlain, 02/00, R-Atlantia]
Submitted as Kára MacLeod, the submitter requested an authentic 10th century Scottish name. The name itself is a mix of a Norse name and a Scots spelling of a Gaelic patronymic derived from a Norse name. Scots did not appear as a separate language after the 10th century. Furthermore, the mixture of two spelling systems is not plausible for 10th century Scotland. While elements from Gaelic and Norse may have been used in a single name, the name itself would be written either entirely in Gaelic or Norse, although the same name could have been written in either language depending on the context. For registration we chose to make the name entirely Gaelic both because it is more "Scottish" and because the resulting name is closer in sound to the original. A fully Norse form would be Kára Ljótsdottír. [Cera ingen Leoid, 03/00, A-Meridies]
[Arianna Kavanaugh] We already have a precedent against mixed Spanish/Irish names (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR of July 1997, p. 7, with the submission of Sanchia O'Connor); mixed Italian/Irish names are not any more plausible. [Adriana Kavanaugh, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Úlfarr MacVanis, he requested an authentic Norse/Scots name. The combination of an Old Norse given name and an Anglicized Scots patronymic had too severe a temporal disparity. We have therefore changed the spelling of the given name to medieval Norwegian. [Ulvar MacVanis, 07/00, A-Lochac]
The submitted documentation had this as a mixed Hungarian/Scots name. No evidence was presented that these cultures were in contact to an extent that would justify registering the name. However, Ladislaus is actually a Latinized form of a relatively common Slavic name, found almost all over Eastern Europe; also, de Brody is found in Reaney and Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. We can therefore simply refer to the precedent from March 1993 that says a Russian/English mixed name is registerable. [Ladislaus de Brody, 07/00, A-Meridies]
... the combination of Manx with Anglicized Irish, while registerable, is not generally found as a period practice. [Egan Taitnyssagh Smilebringer, 07/00, R-Atenveldt]
No evidence was provided of a cultural contact that would justify an English/Swiss mixed name. [Roderick Zweisterne, 07/00, R-Meridies]
Submitted as Muirenn ingen Darragh, the byname mixed Anglicized and Gaelic spelling. As Bordure put it,
Woulfe (p. 494 s.n. Ó Dara) lists Darragh as a modern Anglicized form of the name. As such, using it with ingen violates RfS III.1.a, "Each phrase must be grammatically correct according to the usage of a single language."
[Muirenn ingen Dara, 08/00, A-Atlantia]
There was sufficient contact between England and Russia to allow mixed names under our rules. There was no such contact between Scotland and Russia, but we have seen documentation that MacNeill appears as a surname in England as well. Note, however, that mixed Scots / Russian names are not acceptable, barring new evidence. [Nastasiia MacNeill, 09/00, A-Caid]
Submitted on the LoI as Catharina de Bruyn, the given name was originally submitted as Caterina and changed because the Kingdom College of Heralds did not have evidence for sufficient contact between Venice and Flanders to allow the registration of mixed names. However, the Cultural Atlas of the Renaissance (p. 108) shows trade routes c. 1500 clearly linking Flanders and Venice, as well as numerous other points. That shows ample contact between Flanders and Venice, two of the major trading powers of the era. [Caterina de Bruyn, 09/00, A-Middle]
... mixed Irish / Spanish names are not allowed (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR of July 1997). [Diarmaid de Rossa, 11/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Theresa Boncheval, she had originally submitted Tessa Boncheval. This earlier submission was returned in Kingdom for mixing Italian and French. However, as these two cultures had significant contact with each other in period, the combination is registerable. [Tessa Cheval, 11/00, A-East]
Submitted as Isabele nic Giolla Bhríde, the byname mixed Anglicized and Gaelic spellings. As mixed-language name elements are not allowed we have changed the patronymic to an entirely Anglicized spelling. [Isabele nic Gilvride, 11/00, A-Meridies]
Mixing Russian and German, while not very plausible, is registerable under our rules. [Aleksandra von Drachenklaue, 11/00, R-Ansteorra] [Ed.: Returned for lack of forms]
Submitted as Murchadh inn digri, the name combined Irish and Norse elements. While this is registerable it is a weirdness; to prevent a second weirdness we have changed the given name to a temporally compatible form. [Murchad inn digri, 03/01, A-Meridies]
Unfortunately for the submitter, mixed Irish / Spanish names are not allowed (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR of July 1997). As Teresa was not used in the British Isles until after our period we have to return this. [Teresa Callan, 04/01, R-Atenveldt]
While combining Russian with French is registerable, it is a weirdness. The use of double given names in Russian was also ruled a weirdness by Jaelle of Armida in June 1997. The name is, therefore, not registerable as it is. [Jarucha Ekaterina Delamare, 04/01, R-Caid]
Mahmud itself is a Turkish form of Muhammad, unattested in an Arabic context. While registerable as a part of an Arabic name it is also a weirdness. [Al-Mufassir Ibrahim ibn Abi Cali Mahmud Al-Fatimi, 06/01, R-Ealdoremere] [Ed.: Returned for mulitple weirdnesses]
The name was documented as having a Polish given name with an Italian byname, but no evidence was provided that Poland and Italy were in sufficient cultural contact that the combination is registerable. However, the given name seems not to be limited to Poland: for instance, it was borne by the daughter of Henry the Fat, Duke of Saxony, who later married Lothar II, Holy Roman Emperor. The contact between Germany and Italy was sufficient to allow registration. [Richenza d'Assisi, 07/01, A-Lochac]

COMPATIBLE (SCA)
Note: This section is arranged by name, rather than by date.

... the question was raised whether Aislinn was a medieval name, and if not, whether it should be considered SCA compatible. While evidence suggests that the name is post-period, the name has been registered over 30 times in the past two decades, with at least one registration each year save one. This suggests that the name is commonly enough used to be considered SCA compatible. [Aislinn inghean Mhaoilbhrighde, 08/00, A-Atlantia]

The question was raised whether Aislinn was a medieval name, and if not, whether it should be considered SCA compatible. While evidence suggests that the name is post-period, the name has been registered over 30 times in the past two decades, with at least one registration each year save one. This suggests that the name is commonly enough used to be considered SCA compatible. [Aislinn inghean an Shionnach, 08/00, A-Meridies]

Aislinn was ruled SCA compatible in August 2000. [Aislinn O'Carlin, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Briana is SCA-compatible. [Briana Dolfin, 10/99, A-Ansteorra]

Briana is SCA compatible. [Briana MacNamara, 01/00, A-Atlantia]
... Bronwen has been declared SCA-compatible... [Bronwen Gwehyddes Anglesey, 12/99, A-An Tir]
Ceridwen is SCA-compatible. [Ceridwen merch Tudwal Penwyn, 02/00, A-Atlantia]

Ceridwen is SCA compatible. [Ceridwen Sais, 08/00, A-Caid]

Cerridwen has been ruled SCA compatible in this spelling as well as the more usual ones. [Cerridwen de Skene, 11/00, A-Æthelmearc]

The given name was ruled SCA compatible in this spelling in June 1996. [Cerridwen of Kildare, 11/00, A-West]

Submitted as Ceiridwen Bach, only the spellings Ceridwen and Cerridwen have been ruled SCA compatible in August 1995. [Ceridwen Bach, 07/01, A-Calontir]
... the name already has a weirdness with the use of Corwynn, which is undocumented but SCA compatible, ... [Corwynn the Lost, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
Deirdre is SCA compatible. [Deirdre Fallon, 10/99, A-Atlantia]

Deirdre is SCA compatible. [Deirdre the Wench, 11/99, A-Outlands]

Deirdre is SCA compatible. [Deirdre inghean Ghiolla Ruaidh, 01/00, A-Ansteorra]

Deirdre is SCA-compatible. [Deirdre inghean Dhomhnaill mhic Maidecc, 03/00, A-Caid]
[Dragonhurst] No evidence was supplied that Dragon- was a period element in placenames. Drakehurst would be significantly more authentic. Nevertheless, a cursory search found over 30 SCA names with Dragon-<X> as locatives. Therefore Dragonhurst is SCA compatible. [Anne of Dragonhurst, 02/00, A-Middle]
Fiona is SCA compatible. [Fiona MacLeod, 08/99, A-Atenveldt]

Fiona is SCA compatible. [Fiona of Artemisia, 07/01, A-Artemisia]

Submitted as Fionna McClancy, the given name has only been ruled as SCA compatible in the spelling Fiona. We have changed the name accordingly. [Fiona McClancy, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Furthermore, as of the LoAR cover letter of August, 1995, we do not accept the spelling Gwendolyn, although we do accept Gwendolen. [Gwendolyn of the Isle of Wight, 11/99, R-Meridies]
... Gwyneth has been ruled SCA compatible. [Gwyneth Lewelyne, 02/01, A-Atlantia]
[Ian Marcaiche] This name contains two weirdness: an SCA-compatible given name, and the combination of English and Gaelic orthographies in one name. [Ian Marcaiche, 09/99, R-Outlands]

Arval Benicoeur's article, "Concerning the Names Iain, Ian, and Eoin" mentions the name Eithne ingen Iain i nOchtur Aird in a 12th century Irish Gaelic document. There are other references to Iain (as a genitive form), but they were part of religious names. Nevertheless given the single citation, combined with the fact that Iain is otherwise SCA compatible, we will registered names containing mac Iain or inghean Iain. [Gavin MacIain, 10/99, A-Ansteorra]

... the name Iain, while ruled SCA compatible, is not attested in period. [Iain Bán Menzies, 07/00, R-Atlantia]
Moira is SCA compatible. [Moira MacGregor, 09/99, A-Outlands]
Rhiannon is SCA compatible. [Rhiannon MacPherson, 08/99, A-Caid]

Rhiannon is SCA compatible. [Rhiannon of Pembroke Castle, 09/99, A-An Tir]

Rhiannon is SCA compatible. [Rhiannon of Lough Derg, 10/99, A-Calontir]

Rhiannon is SCA compatible. [Rhiannon Llygad Flaidd, 02/00, A-Atenveldt]

Rhiannon is SCA compatible. [Rhiannon of Sevenoaks, 07/01, A-West]
Rowan is SCA compatible. [Rowan of Hakesleah, 12/99, A-West]
Rowena is SCA compatible. [Rowena of Seventowers, 07/99, A-Lochac]

Rowena ... has been declared SCA compatible. [Rowena of Avalon, 08/99, A-Artemisia]
... we are reluctantly making the byname the Lost SCA compatible. [Jordan the Lost, 07/01, A-Calontir]
[the Wanderer] She requested an authentic English name. However, the name is not authentic, as it combines a Gaelic given name with an SCA compatible byname. [Morag the Wanderer, 07/01, A-Artemisia]

CONFLICT - Other Names

[Hawks Keep] This conflicts with Hawk Herald of Calontir. Keep is the designator, and therefore does not contribute towards difference; neither does the addition of the possessive. [Arik Alton, 08/99, R-Atenveldt]
[Paramount Pursuivant] This title conflicts with Paramount Pictures, which the College of Arms feels is a non-SCA name important enough to protect. Also, we'd like to see more evidence of adjectives used as heraldic titles in period. [Atenveldt, Kingdom of, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
[Order of the Caltrop] The name conflicts with Caltrop Pursuivant, which is registered to the Kingdom of Calontir. Æthelmearc has a letter to conflict from the King and Queen of Calontir. However, current practice allows someone owning Order of the X to use X Pursuivant and vice versa. Therefore two such items are effectively identical. Since we cannot register two identical items even with permission, the order name must be returned. [Æthelmearc, Kingdom of, 10/99, R-Æthelmearc]
[Order of Le Pomme d'Or] Conflict with the Palme d'Or, the award for best film at the Cannes Film Festival. As one of the very few international awards known in America, we consider it important enough to protect, and there is insufficent difference in sounce between Pomme and Palme. [Arn Hold, Barony of, 01/00, R-Artemisia]
[Award of the Sapphire] This name does not conflict with the personal name Sapphyra (registered August 1971), because personal names do not conflict with order names. [Middle Kingdom, 02/00, A-Middle]
[House Ancaster] This name is in aural conflict with the protected real-world house of Lancaster. [Azelin Cola of Wishford, 08/00, R-East]
[House White Hart] The household name is in conflict with the inn of White Hart. While none of the real-world inns of that name is important enough to protect under our current rules, the one featured in Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart is. [Gisla Rodumna, 11/00, R-An Tir]
[Company of Pembroke] This conflicts with the borough of Pembroke, which has its own entry in the Encyclopædia Britannica. As this is a direct conflict, we are not at this time making a ruling whether Company of <Place> is registerable as a household name. Also, we wish to remind the College that for conflict purposes there are two kinds of names: personal and others. Household names, therefore, can conflict with place names, order names, or titles. [Conrad von Zuberbuehler, 02/01, R-Artemisia]
[Torna, Canton of] The name is a 14th century form of the name of the real-world town within the Canton. Submitting it for the name of the canton raises the question of how we treat period forms of real-world names of SCA branches.

All in all, we can see three different reasons to return a name of this sort. First, of course, the submitted name may be well enough known to be protected under section III.A.5 of the Administrative Handbook. Thus, for instance, we would not register Birka, either to a group forming near the old site in Sweden or to anyone else. The submitted name does not appear in general encyclopaedias, like the Encyclopaedia Britannica, so by current practice it is not important enough to protect.

Second, the submitted name may be presumptuous. Granted, section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions addresses only names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character. However, it seems appropriate to apply similar standards to personal and non-personal names, and Section VI.4 gives us enough discretion to do so. We would, therefore, return names that unmistakably imply identity with a protected place: for instance, while Londinium does not have its own article in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, London is protected and so registering the Roman name for the city would be presumptuous. In the current case, the modern town does not have its own entry in Britannica and the submission is thus clear on this count as well.

Third, the name may run afoul of section III.A.9 of the Administrative Handbook: No name or device will be registered to a submitter if it is identical to a name or device used by the submitter for purposes of identification outside of a Society context. Thus, in the present case, we would not have registered Tornio or Torneå, those being the currently used names for the town. The submitted name differs from each of these by one syllable, and that is generally considered sufficient difference for personal names. Again, we see no point in treating place names differently. [Torna, Canton of, 06/01, A-Drachenwald]

CONFLICT - Personal Names
see Conflict Table for a quick reference

This name is clear of both Conal Mac Dhómhnuill and Coinneach Ó Domhnail. Conal and Coinneach are significantly different in sound and spelling. Mac ‘son of' and O ‘descendant (grandson) of/of clan' refer to significantly different relationships and are therefore clear. [Coinneach mac Dhomhnuill, 09/99, A-Outlands]
While Mary MacGregor was the wife of Rob Roy MacGregor, she does not have her own entry in the standard sources, and we find no other reason to rule her important enough to protect. [Implying that Mary and Moira would conflict.] [Moira MacGregor, 09/99, A-Outlands]
Conflict with Jeanne d'Evreaux, a queen of France. While she does not have her own listing in the Encyclopedia Britannica, prior precedent has protected queens of major kingdoms, and in her case she is also important as the owner of an well known book of hours, making her better known in the Society than in the general community. [Jane Devereux, 09/99, R- Atlantia]
Conflict with the registered name Shauna MacLeod. There is insufficient difference between the given names. [Seán MacLeod, 09/99, R-Meridies]
This name is close to but clear of Bianca Drago. There is one less syllable in Drake, and we believe that the difference in sound and appearance is sufficient to make these clear. [Bianca Drake, 10/99, A-Calontir]
Conflict with the registered name Mara O'Brien. There is insufficient difference between the given names. [Maire O'Brien, 10/99, R-Calontir]
Conflict with Caitlin nicCoinnich. MacKenzie is an anglicized form of mac Coinnich, making the two identical for the purposes of conflict. [Caitlin MacKenzie, 10/99, R-East]
Conflict with the registered name Caitlin MacGregor. The two names sound almost identical when pronounced correctly. [Katerine MacGregor, 10/99, R-Middle]
This is not in conflict with Edward Montague, second Earl of Manchester. He only appears in a biographical dictionary (and then under his title), and currently we require an appearence in sources such as general encyclopedias before we consider them important enough to protect. [Edward Montague, 11/99, A-Middle]
Conflict with the registered name Catairiona ní Fhlannagáin. By rule V.1.a.i (Difference of given names), "Irrespective of differences in sound and appearance, a given name is not significantly different from any of its diminutives when they are used as given names." [Cait inghean ui Flannagain, 11/99, R-Artemisia]
This conflicts with John of Gaunt, father of Henry IV of England, listed in the Encyclopædia Britannica Online. There is little difference in the sound of the two names. [Jan van Ghent, 11/99, R-Lochac]
Conflict with Sir Charles Roberts Canadian nationalist writer and naturalist, who has his own listing in the Britannica Online. [Charles Roberts, 11/99, R-Outlands]
The name is not in conflict with the Adelicia, wife of Henry I, since she is actually known as Adelicia of Louvain. Furthermore, the name of a less important queen of a less important king is not automatically worthy of protection. [Adelicia Brabant, 12/99, A-Ansteorra]
The name is not in conflict with either Tycho Brahe or Johannes Kepler, and because the references are to period persons, this is not obtrusively modern. [Tycho Kepler, 12/99, A-Caid]
Conflict with the registered names Sean Dalamara and Jeanne de la Mare. [Sean de la Mare, 12/99, R-An Tir]
Conflict with the registered name Sebastian Sturme; they are too similar in appearance. [Sebastian Sterne, 12/99, R-An Tir]
This conflicts with John Doe, which is a well known legal term for an unidentified male. [Seaan Dowe, 12/99, R-Caid]
This does not conflict with Antonella di Marco. Antonella is a diminutive of Antonia, not Antonio, and the two names neither look nor sound alike. [Antonio di Marco, 01/00, A-Caid]
Because it is reasonable for a resident of a town to be named after the town's patron saint, this name is not presumptuous. Furthermore, Saint Morwenna, the patron saint of Morwenstow, is not important enough to protect. [Morwenna of Morwenstow, 01/00, A-Drachenwald]
Conflict with the registered name Caitlin of Greenwood. When pronounced correctly, the only difference in sound is the very minor difference between an "r" and an "l" and sometimes the difference between a "t" and a "th". Neither change is sufficient difference. [Catharine Grenewode, 01/00, R-Atlantia]
Conflict with the registered name Dougal MacRae. The documentation for the name implies that both names, being variants of each other are pronounced similarly. [Dugald MacRath, 01/00, R-Drachenwald]
Conflict with Johann Faust, better known as Doctor Faustus, a significant legendary character. Hans is a diminutive of Johann. [Hans Faust, 02/00, R-Ansteorra]
Conflict with the registered name Katheryn MacEvin. Both elements are simply spelling variants of each other. [Katherine mac Ewen, 02/00, R-Middle]
Conflict with the registered name Bernard ben Barra. Neither ben nor de contribute to difference and the primary elements are not significantly different. [Bernard de Barre, 03/00, R-Drachenwald]
Conflict with the registered name Owen FitzEdward. There is insufficient difference between the given names because they are simply spelling variants of the same name. As Fitz and -son indicate the same relationship there is also insufficient difference in the bynames. [Owain Edwardson, 03/00, R-Caid]
A possible conflict was called against Aubrey de Vere, found in Encyclopaedia Britannica. However, according to Morlet's Dictionnaire etymologique des noms de famille Auveré appears to be a French variant of Alveredus (and thus related to Alfred), while Withycombe notes Aubrey comes from Auberi, the French form of Alberich. The names are therefore ethymologically distinct; furthermore, there is no aural conflict between the two. [Auveré de Ver, 04/00, A-Æthelmearc]
Submitted as Ewan MacLaren of Balquhidder, … dropping Balquhidder would result in a conflict with the already registered name of Eoin MacLaren … [Ewan of Balquhidder, 04/00, A-An Tir]
This conflicts with the registered name of Brianna O Duinn. [Brian Ó Duinn, 04/00, R-An Tir]
This conflicts with the registered name of Eileen Fraser.According to the Rules for Submissions, section V.1.a.i, "Two given names are significantly different only if they differ significantly in sound and appearance". While the difference between the pronunciations of Ellen and Eileen is not altogether insignificant, it would make this a borderline case. However, they do not differ significantly in appearance. [Ellen Fraser, 04/00, R-An Tir]
This name conflicts with the registered name of Uilleam Mackintosh. [William Mac an toisich, 04/00, R-An Tir]
... conflicts with Elisée de Calais, registered in December 1998. Section V.1.a.i of the Rules for Submissions says that a given name is not significantly different from any of its diminutives, and, while Elisée is not in a strict ethymological sense a diminutive of Elisabeth, it is often used as one. [Elisabeth de Calais, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
This conflicts with Meadhbh ni Dhomhnaill , registered in April 1996. Both given names and patronymics differ only in the period of the orthography, and no difference is given from the change from ni to ingen. [Medb ingen Domnaill, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
The name conflicts with Brian de Barri [Brione de Barre, 05/00, R-Drachenwald]
This conflicts with Laura Aleyn. [Laura Lynn, 05/00, R-Outlands]
Submitted as Alexander Macrae, the name would have conflicted with Alexander MacKai, registered in March 1999. We have therefore changed the byname to another documented variant. [Alexander Macrad, 06/00, A-Caid]
The question was raised in commentary whether a name which uses a doubled name element should really be clear if either of the doubled element taken singly with the rest of the name is a conflict. As several commenters considered this submission unacceptable for this reason, we are initiating discussion on the matter in the cover letter to this LoAR. However, as with other rules changes, the current rules will be applied to the submission that initiates the change. By these, this name does not conflict. [Margaret Elizabeth Stuart, 06/00, A-Trimaris]
This conflicts with the Scottish cardiologist Sir James MacKenzie (1853-1925). [Jamie MacKenzie, 06/00, R-Caid]
This conflicts with Mikjal Haraldson ... [Michael Haroldsson, 06/00, R-Caid]
This name conflicts aurally with that of the saint used to document the byname, Carolus Boromeus. Since the latter has his own entry in Encyclopædia Britannica he is important enough to be protected by our current standards. [Karius Boromeus, 06/00, R-Calontir]
This conflicts with Jehanne d'Avignon [Johan d'Avignon, 06/00, R-Lochac]
A conflict was called against the name of Alexander MacKenzie, Prime Minister of Canada 1873–1878. While we agree this is as close as one can get, we eventually decided to side with the commenters who felt that the difference in both sound and appearance is significant enough that the names do not conflict. [Alasdair MacKenzie, 07/00, A-Atlantia]
This name conflicts with that of Alix d'Avignon ... [Alicia d'Avignon, 07/00, R-Atlantia]
This name conflicts with the real-world opera singer Annie Louise Cary, 1841-1921, found in Encyclopaedia Britannica. [Anne Cary, 08/00, R-An Tir]
This is in conflict with Donnchadh MacAonghais ... [Duncan MacAngus, 09/00, R-Æethelmearc]
We are not entirely sure the present-day authors Donald MacDonald, Donald F. MacDonald and Donald L. MacDonald, cited in commentary, are important enough to protect. Da'ud ibn Auda wrote, in the March 1992 LoAR on a case of a conflict against a modern author: His name is apparently too recent to appear yet in any of our standard sources, but he is clearly well known enough to warrant protection. (Even Lord Laurel who has read none of his works, is familiar with all the titles mentioned by the commenters.) We are not confident that any of the cited authors are that well known. It doesn't matter, however, since the name is also in aural conflict with Ronald MacDonald of hamburger fame, who is well known enough to protect. [Donald MacDonald, 09/00, R-Ansteorra]
The submission consists of the given names, in order, of the submitter. As this is one of the possible common use names, we have to return this submission for conflict against the submitter herself, protected under section III.A.9 of the Administrative Handbook. [Mary Amanda, 09/00, R-Artemisia]
This is a resubmission of a Laurel return for conflict with Johann Faust, better known as Doctor Faustus, a significant legendary character. Hans is a diminutive of Johann, so something else was needed to clear the conflict. The submitter tried to add a locative byname von Bamberg. Unfortunately for him, however, Bamberg is the home city of Dr. Faust. Just as Julie Capulet of Verona would conflict with Juliet of Romeo and Juliet fame, this submission still conflicts with the Doctor. [Hans Faust von Bamberg, 10/00, R-Ansteorra]
The name conflicts aurally with Eric Thorhallson. Also, the correct form of the byname would be Þorvaldsson. [Eiríkr Þorvaldson, 10/00, R-Artemisia]
This conflicts with Angus MacDougall [Áengus Ó Dubhghaill, 10/00, R-Caid]
As the submitted documentation indicates, this name is a usual Polish form of Stanislas of Cracow. As such it is a fine name, except for one thing: there already is a rather well known Stanislas of Cracow, who got his fame in essentially the same manner as Thomas Becket did in England. … Not surprisingly, he also has his own entry in quite a few general encyclopaedias. [Stanislaw Krakowski, 10/00, R-Meridies]
[Ian vs. Eoin] The question was raised in commentary whether this name conflicts with the British industrialist Sir Ian MacGregor (1912—1998), listed in Encyclopaedia Britannica. However, in the April 1996 LoAR Talan Gwynek, then Pelican King of Arms, ruled that Eoin and Ian are significantly different in sound as well as appearance. [Eoin MacGriogair, 11/00, A-Caid]
[Margarete Rau] The issue was raised in commentary that this name is in conflict with Margaret Rau, a contemporary author of children's literature. Determining whether such persons are important enough is somewhat difficult, as general encyclopaedias are necessarily much more vague about contemporary than historical persons. There are, however, two relevant prior rulings.
Patrick MacManus. Name.

Conflict with Patrick F. McManus, a well-known modern writer of humor. His name is apparently to recent to appear yet in any of our standard sources, but he is clearly well known enough warrant protection. (Even Lord Laurel who has read none of his works, is familiar with all of the titles mentioned by the commenters.)

(Da'ud ibn Auda, March 1992 LoAR; the name was returned)

Thorarinn Gunnersson. Name.

The name was submitted as Thorarinn Gunnarsson on the LoI, but his form has Gunnersson, which is also documentable. We do not consider the modern author of fantasy and science fiction important enough to protect.

(Talan Gwynek, August 1996; the name was registered)
In the current case neither the author nor her works were widely recognised within the College, as appears to have happened in the first of these prior rulings. We therefore register the name. [Margarete Rau, 11/00, A-Caid]
This is in conflict with Andreas Hak, registered December 1980. The given names are variants of each other, and not quite different enough to be clear; the bynames are in aural conflict. [Andrew Hawoc, 11/00, R-An Tir]
This conflicts with Eibhlín MacEogan… [Eibhlin Macewan, 11/00, R-East]
This name conflicts with the cartoon character Peter Parker, also known as Spiderman. [Pedr Le Parcar, 11/00, R-Middle]
This is in aural conflict with Derdriu ingen Mhurchadha ... [Derdriu ingen Muiredaig, 12/00, R-Atlantia]
This name conflicts with Catriona Nic Aoidh, registered in December 1998. [Caitríona inghean Aoidh, 02/01, R-Middle]
Submitted as Ihone MacEogan, that name conflicted with Eoin mac Eoghain ... [Ihone MacEogan of Bannockburn, 04/01, A-Ansteorra]
[Siobhán inghean uí Dhomnaill] The question was raised in commentary whether this name conflicts with Siobhan MacDonald, registered in 1985. However, in September 1999 Elsbeth Ann Roth made a ruling which is relevant here:

Mac son of and O descendant (grandson) of/of clan refer to significantly different relationships and are therefore clear.

It seems natural to apply this ruling to the corresponding feminine forms inghean and inghean uí as well. [Siobhán inghean uí Dhomnaill, 04/01, A-Ansteorra]
The name conflicts with Thomas Arundel, archbishop of Ely, who has his own entry in the Encyclopaedia Britannica. [Thomas de Ely, 04/01, R-Drachenwald]
The name is in aural conflict with Catríona Macraith, registered in April 1994: the given names are identical and the bynames differ only in the final consonant. [Catrina Mackrae, 05/01, R-An Tir]
This conflicts with Katharine Campbell, registered in June 1988. According to RfS V.1.a, two name elements need to differ significantly in sound and appearance to be considered different. The difference in pronunciation between Catriona and Katharine is not quite significant enough. [Catriona Campbell, 05/01, R-Meridies]
This name ... conflicts with Morgan Griffin, registered in October 1990. [Morgan ap Grufydd, 06/01, R-Ealdormere]
This is in aural conflict with Astrith Ulfsdottir. [Astrid Olafsdatter, 06/01, R-East]
This conflicts with Brigid MacGowan ... [Brighid ingen ui Gobhainn, 06/01, R-East]
This is in aural conflict with Margaret MacDuibhshithe... [Margaret MacDuff, 07/01, A-Ansteorra]
This conflicts with Fiona MacGregor, registered in March 1985. [Fiona ingen Griogair, 07/01, R-Artemisia]
This is in aural conflict with Aindrea MacLeod... [Andrew Macleod, 07/01, R-Calontir]
Unfortunately for the submitter, Catherine of Navarra or Catalina de Navarra was the sovereign queen of that kingdom in the early 1480's; she ruled jointly with her husband Jean d'Albret until 1512, when the kingdom became a part of Catalonia-Aragon. [Catalina de Navarra, 07/01, R-Middle]

DANISH

... the use of an English given name with an otherwise Danish name is registerable... [Christian Jorgensen af Helsingør, 09/99, A-Artemisia]

DEITY

Taranis is only documented as the name of a god [Taran Wulf, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
Ó Corráin and Maguire's documentation for Neamhain lists the name only as an ancient Irish war goddess. Without documentation that humans used this name in period, we must return it. [Neamhain inghean uí hEidirsceóil, 08/99, R-Atlantia]
[Eos Du] To quote Metron Ariston:
As far as I can determine, Eos was never used for a human being in the classical period or later, unlike Aurora, Hercules, Dionysia or Diana. Ηωσ [the Greek letters eta, omega, sigma] or Eos in Greek had the primary meaning of dawn or daylight or daytime. Only in a very secondary manner was the term used for a goddess, the personification of dawn. Indeed, unlike more popular Greek gods who produced theophoric names like Apollodorus or Heracles (Hercules), Eos does not seem to have spawned any names at all in classical Greek. Since most of the names adopted by the classical humanists (e.g., Mars, Hercules and Diana) were from the Latin store and involved deities or demigods who appeared in or were associated with the legendary genealogies of the Roman period, the use of Eos would be highly unlikely. Using it with a Gaelic epithet is even more unlikely. (If someone were going for a humanist name, they would be much more likely to go for a Latin translation with the same meaning. Here it would be likely to be nigra, i.e., black.)
[Eos Du, 03/00, R-Caid]
Submitted as Proteus of Verona, the only documentation for Proteus was of the Greek Sea-God. Since there was no documentation for the name as a name of a human being, it cannot be used as an SCA name. We have therefore changed it to Protais, a name closely resembling the submitted name. Protais is found in Dauzat's Dictionnnaire Etymologique des noms de famille et des prenoms de France as a form of Protasius, the name of a 1st century Saint and a 6th century French bishop. [Protais of Verona, 09/00, A-Trimaris]
[Muirne] Unfortunately, Ó Corráin and Maguire, Irish Names, only cite Muirne as the mother of Finn mac Cumaill — who, as they note under Finn, was really a Celtic god. The submitter might consider Muirenn instead; Ó Corráin and Maguire say it "was an extremely popular name in the early period". [Muirne inghean Séamus Ó Corcra, 09/00, R-Atlantia]

DOCUMENTATION

Current precedent is to accept the names of significant characters from period Arthurian literature as there is a pattern of such names being used in England and France in period. [Bedivere de Byron, 06/99, A-Atlantia]
[House Stirling Hart.] The examples cited in the documentation were insufficient to justify the use of a town in an inn name. [Madog Maelgwn ap Llywelyn, 08/99, R-Caid]
The cases where documentation from Shakesphere is sufficient by itself require that the name be formed in a manner consistent with sixteenth century England (it also helps if the play was written before 1600). In this case Yorick appears to not follow English naming practices, but instead was specifically intended to be a foreign sounding version of George. Barring evidence that the name is compatible with period style we must return it. [Yorick of the Craigs, 08/99, R-Caid]
... the submitter's source for the name, The Writer's Digest Character Naming Sourcebook, is not by itself a good enough source for names, especially as its information is contradicted by better sources. [Wiktorzyja Adalbertowna, 10/99, A-Calontir]
As noted before, Hanks and Hodges is a particularly poor source for period names. [Aeron Aschennen of Clan MacKenzie, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
Since the submitter did not provide copies of the S. Gabriel letter we decline to say anything definite about the suitability of the byname. [Roderick Zweisterne, 07/00, R-Meridies]
We have traditionally been somewhat more lenient with names from cultures for which we don't have adequate reference works, and we see no reason to change this policy. However, it does not mean that one can in such cases simply look up random words in a dictionary. At the very least we would expect the submitters to show, first, that the name is grammatically correct and, second, that similar constructions exist somewhere else. These examples of similar names would ideally be from nearby cultures. [Vilku Urvas, Shire of, 09/00, R-Middle]
Submitted as Emry Lioncourt, the only documentation for the given name was from the Info Base of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. However, as noted before, the goals of the LDS are such that their data cannot be considered reliable for the purposes of documenting spelling variants. [Emery Lioncourt, 12/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Astor Peyton, the given name was documented as a header spelling in Reaney and Wilson's A Dictionary of English Surnames. While we do register header spellings from this source as standard modern forms, the header spelling of a surname, as in this case, is not necessarily acceptable as a given name. We have therefore substituted a spelling used as a given name and dated by Reaney and Wilson to 1642, within our grey area. Granted, they also say that the name was used as a given name in the 17th century, but this is not sufficient for disallowing the name: the Glossary of Terms says it is logical to assume that something current in the period 1601—1650 may also have been current in the last years of the 16th century, so long as there is no specific evidence to the contrary. Reaney and Wilson, while casting doubts, are not specific enough. [Aster Peyton, 05/01, A-An Tir]

DUTCH

Submitted as Gerlinda Uda Agast , the name had two moderately serious problems. First, there was a five-century gap between the documented dates for the given names and the byname; second, we have found no evidence that double given names were used in Dutch-speaking regions in our period. Neither of these problems would in itself be grounds for return, but the combination is unacceptable, as it would take the name two steps away from period practice. We have therefore dropped the second given name. [Gerlinda Agast, 05/00, A-Middle]
The given name had two problems. First, names from classical literature are not known to have been used in the Netherlands in period. This in itself would not have warranted a return by our rules, as Netherlands had access to classical authors. Second, Pythias in the context of Damon and — seems to be a misreading of Phinthias; the only classical references to Pythias refer to females. [Pythias of Rotterdam, 06/00, R-Caid]
First, Mefrouwe is a form of address that literally means 'My Lady' — it is therefore inappropriate in an SCA name. Further, op den See does not mean 'from the Sea' but 'at sea', in the sense of being afloat . The appropriate form of the lake would be van der See. [Mefrouwe Beatrix op den See, 09/00, R-Outlands]
Capitalization of van is likely to be a modern phenomenon in Dutch. However, the submitter has provided documentation which lists Van Kouwenhoven with a capitalized V, in addition to other names from the same source where this capitalization does not occur. While the capitalization may appear because of normalization, we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt. [Agnes Van Kouwenhoven, 06/01, A-Middle]

ENGLISH

While Zoë is unattested in England until modern times, it is the name of a late Roman Christian martyr. Such names formed an available name pool in period practice and thus this is a plausible extrapolation. [Cassandra Zoë Paganel, 08/99, A-Caid]
The use of two given names is not a problem; Reaney and Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, list a number of feminine given names used as unmarked matronymics. [Christiana Ailitha, 09/99, A-Artemesia]
Submitted as Dorian of Whispering Oaks, the submitter's source apparently changed the Greek names into similar English names. No other documentation for the use of Dorian in period could be found. We therefore substituted its Italian form, Dorio. Furthermore, no evidence was presented, nor was any found, that Whispering is an adjectbive used in place names in period. Therefore, that element was dropped. [Dorio of the Oaks, 10/99, A-East]
Submitted as Juliana de Florey, called The Imaginour, no evidence was presented or has been found that the use of called is a valid documentary form for English. [Juliana de Florey le Ymagour, 10/99, A-Meridies]
[Trinity] So we have given names derived from four great ecclesiastical feasts. [Christmas, Easter, Pentacost, and Epiphany] (Withycombe mentions also Midwinter and Loveday, which are also day names but not ecclesiastical feasts.) The striking thing is that this is a very short list. This is not enough to constitute a plausible productive pattern, much less extended to nouveaux lesser feasts like Trinity Sunday. [Trinity Munro, 10/99, R-Æthelmearc]
We were given no evidence that Lindsay was a given name in period. [Lindsay MacBean, 10/99, R-Calontir]
Submitted as Eliza O Coileain, while mixed Gaelic/English spellings are allowed, we still require that the grammar of the Gaelic patronymic be correct. We have therefore substituted an appropriate Anglicized form of the byname. [Eliza O'Culane, 11/99, R-Atenveldt]
... there is no evidence that unmarked patronymics were used in Old English names. [Æðelwulf Omundes sunu, 11/99, A-Trimaris]
No documentation was provided, nor could any be found, proving that Camelos was a place name. Reaney, Origin of English Placenames, states that Camulos was the name of a deity and the related place name was Camulodunum. Robert Colchester (the English form of the place name) would be a great medieval name. [Robert Camulos Brigantius, 03/00, R-Caid]
Submitted as Phyllida Longacre of Ravenglass, Phyllida is the accusative singular form of the classical feminine name Phyllis. The earliest citation in English seems to be Phillida and Corydon by Nicholas Breton (1542 - 1626) who appears to have been trying to translate or at least emulate a poem by Propertius. In the original, the name Phyllis appears in the Latin accusative (Phyllida) and using this in translation is probably a misreading of the correct form of the name. As so often happens, a popular poem or song gave rise to a brief vogue for the name. It seems likely that the submitted form appeared as a given name after our period, so we have changed the given name to the documented period form. [Phyllis Longacre of Ravenglass, 04/00, A-Æthelmearc] [Ed.: Overturned, Phillida Parker, 06/01, A-Ealdoremere]
... Esther would appear to be constructed in a period manner — it is a Biblical name, and Biblical names were used in England. We can therefore register the name. [Esther Millar, 05/00, A-Outlands]
Submitted as Mary Catherine of Mull, she wishes an authentic 13th–15th century name. Since double given names were not used in Britain in that time period we have dropped the second one. [Mary of Mull, 06/00, A-Caid]
Submitted on the LoI as Tom MacGrimm, the name was changed to that form in Kingdom; it was originally submitted as Tam MacGrimm. However, Reaney and Wilson's Dictionary of English Surnames has "Peter Tamelyn 1327 SRsf. A double diminutive of Tam (Tom). cf. Tomlin." and "William Tamson 1395 EA (OS) iv (C); Walter Tampson 1641 PrSo; John Tampson 1642 PrD. 'Son of Tam', a variant of Tom, a pet-form of Thomas." Therefore Tam appears to be an acceptable given name. However, there is no documentation for adding mac to the documentable Grimm. We have therefore changed the given name back to the original form and removed mac from the byname. [Tam Grimm, 09/00, A-Outlands]
Submitted as David Warren Rufier of Monmouth, the name has a given name, two unmarked patronymic bynames (Warren and Rufier) and a locative byname. This kind of construction does not follow known period naming practices — a double surname where both were derived from given names and a locative byname is quite unlikely. However, according to Dauzat, Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille et des prénoms de France, the name Rouffier may come from a descriptive byname meaning 'scab'. We have, therefore, changed Rufier to the similar-sounding Rouffier so that the name is composed of a given name followed by a patronymic, descriptive and locative byname. This combination, while uncommon, is registerable. [David Warren Rouffier of Monmouth, 10/00, A-Trimaris]
Submitted as Lili of Eastham, no documentation was provided for the spelling of the given name. We have therefore changed it to a form dated to 1247 in Reaney and Wilson's A Dictionary of English Surnames. [Lilie of Eastham, 11/00, A-East]
Submitted as Robert of the Quill, no documentation was provided for the byname. However, as Argent Snail notes, the OED dates the word quill to 1412, although as a part of a reed instead of the meaning we are now used to. As a feather, the OED dates it to 1552. They also date the word to 1610 as a heraldic charge from Guilliam (a quill of yarn). Inn signs were frequently based on heraldic charges, and we have changed the byname accordingly. [Robert atte Quill, 11/00, A-East]
As we wrote in the July 2000 LoAR,
While we allow real-world name elements in SCA names without further documentation, this is restricted to cases where "such elements are not excessively obtrusive." Combining a Gaelic Irish given name with what appears to be a non-European surname falls afoul of this restriction.
Combining an English given name with a Hindi byname is no less obtrusive. [Margaret Singh, 02/01, R-Outlands]
While a submission was returned in April 2000 because of lack of documentation for the given name Phyllida/Phillida, Argent Snail found a citation of a Fillida who was married in 1620. It therefore appears that the name did appear as a given name early enough to be registerable. [Phillida Parker, 06/01, A-Ealdoremere]
Submitted on the LoI as Marguerite of Sandwich, a second given name was dropped in Kingdom. Since double given names were occasionally used in late period England we have changed the name back to the originally submitted form. [Marguerite Elisabeth of Sandwich, 07/01, A-Calontir]

FINNISH

The name is returned for lack of a given name. While Kissa is a word in Finnish, there was no documentation given to show that this follows a pattern of Finnish given names. [Kissa Sveitarbot, 08/99, R-Caid]

FRENCH

We find no evidence of Danielle in period. However, it follows a pattern of feminizing masculine in France, and Daniel was found in "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" by Colm Dubh. [Danielle de Froideau, 10/99, A-Æthelmearc]
The name was submitted as Amariah de Clovis. While there was a pattern in 16th century England of using Old Testament names, we know of no such pattern in medieval French names. Barring such evidence and barring any direct evidence of Amariah as a French name, we cannot register the combination. [Amauri de Clovis, 10/99, A-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Béatrix d'Angoulême, the submitter requested an authentic 15th century form. Such a form would have used neither accents nor circumflexes. Because the circumflex is used to indicate an old 's' that is no longer pronounced, once we remove the circumflex we must add back in the 's'. [Beatrix d'Angoulesme, 11/99, A-Ansteorra]
Charmant is dated to 1550 in Dauzat, DuBois, and Mitterand, Nouveau Dictionnaire Étymologique. The feminine Charmante therefore is acceptable as a descriptive byname. [Honorée la Charmante, 11/99, A-Caid]
Submitted as Genevieve Gabriel d'Avon Plubel, the name had a given name, a patronymic byname, a locative byname and a hereditary surname; we have no evidence that this kind of byname set was used. However, feminising the second name and switching the last two gives two given names, a hereditary surname and a locative byname which, while not ideal, is registerable. Dropping one of the two first names and one of the last two would make this a fine 15th century French name. [Genevieve Gabrielle Plubel d'Avon, 04/00, A-Atenvedlt]
Submitted as Jean-Pierre Dubois, we know of no period examples of double given names that use the hyphenation. [Jean Pierre Dubois, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Mimet the Minx, the documentation for Mimet is as a byname. However, Argent Snail pointed out that Flutre's "Table des noms propres avec toutes leurs variantes figurant dans les romans du moyen age écrits en français ou en provençal et actuellement publiés ou analysés" has Mimienne, dated 1528. Although the name is cited as belonging to the mother of Merlin, she was human and therefore this can be used as documentation, although barely. [Mimienne the Minx, 04/00, A-Atlantia]
Submitted as Simon Ker Bouchard, no evidence was given for the combination of an Irish byname followed by a French surname of apparently patronymic origin. Dauzat (Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille et des prénoms de France) tells that the initial element ker is a Breton word meaning "village"; Morlet (Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de famille) notes further that it is cognate to the caer found in Britain. It is stated to frequently appear in toponymic formations for the names of domains followed by the name of an ancient owner. As Bouchard is an ancient baptismal name, Kerbouchard would seem to follow such known examples as Kerdavid and Kerjean. [Simon Kerbouchard, 06/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Delphine de la Forêt Verte, no evidence was submitted that 'Green Forest' would be a meaningful place name. However, Dauzat & Rostaing, Dicyionnaire etymologique de noms de Lieux en France, lists places named la Forêt in various spellings from 9th century onwards. [Delphine de la Forêt, 06/00, A-Calontir]
While accents were not used consistently in period French, they were used on occasion, for instance in Louis Meigret's Le tretté de la grammere françoe, published in 1550. [Angelique Michiele du Hérisson, 03/01, A-Middle]

GERMAN

[Maximilliam] ... we know of no examples of Maximillian with a double-l. Therefore the given name was changed to a documented German form. [Maximilian Utz von Wulfen, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
Colm Dubh found a citation of Annalies in 1634 (Wilfred Seibicke, Historisches Deutsches Vornamenbuch), which is in our "gray area" of documentation. Therefore we will allow the compound given name. We will, however, only allow it in the listed spelling (barring documentation that another spelling is a valid period variant). [Annalies Grossmund, 10/99, A-Calontir]
Submitted as Rosalinda Francisca Gertrude Kesselheim, the submitter justified the name as a mixture of Spanish and German. In neither language are three given names justified, therefore we dropped the first middle name. This name still has a "weirdness", as Rosalinda has fallen out of use in Germany by the time double given names were in use. [Rosalinda Gertrude Kesselheim, 12/99, A-Ansteorra]
[Hans Holzarbeiter] No one was able to find any actual examples of Holzarbeiter as an occupational surname, but as it follows a standard pattern of occupational names we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt. [Hans Holzarbeiter, 12/99, A-Atlantia]
No evidence was given, and none was found, to indicate that Blitzkopf, "lightning-head," was a reasonable byname. The German surnames ending in -head all use modifiers that describe heads, such as "broad head," "hard head," "pretty head," "curly head," and "black head." [Jochen Blitzkopf, 02/00, R-Æthelmearc]
Submitted under the name Elisabeth Johanna von der Flossenburg, von der appears to have been used with common names and von with proper names; it is rather similar to the English distinction between of and of the. As Flossenburg is a proper name, we have to agree with the earlier return. [Elisabeth Johanna von Flossenburg, 04/00, A-Æthelmearc]
[Hilderun zu dem Alpenwald] Submitted as Hilderun aus dem Alpenwald, she requested an authentic German name. We have therefore changed the preposition aus, widely used in the Society but rarely if ever used in period, to the documented and widely used zu. [Aline le Fey, 06/00, A-Caid]
Submitted as Alric Rolf von Merzig, the submitter requested an authentic 12th—13th century German name. Double given names were not used at that time, so we had to drop one … [Alric von Merzig, 06/00, A-Caid]
No evidence was supplied as to why 'the Accursed' would be a reasonable byname. Even if such evidence had been found, the grammatically correct form would be Verdammte. [Gregor der Verdammt, 06/00, R-Trimaris]
This name has several problems. First, no dated evidence was submitted for the given name. Second, neither was evidence given for the unusual byname Haifisch, meaning 'shark.' Third, the second byname der Laut does not mean 'the Loud' but 'the Tone'; this doesn't fit with our knowledge about period bynames. Finally, no evidence was submitted for using two descriptive bynames in German. [Arnak Haifisch der Laut, 07/00, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Adalwolfa von der Helle, the question was raised whether there was a pattern of feminizing Germanic masculine names. A quick browse through Morlet's Les noms de personne sur le territoire de l'ancienne Gaule du VIe au XIIe siècle, vol. I - les noms issus du germanique continental et les créations gallo-germaniques does reveal enough pairs of the type AdalsadaAdalsadus to suggest such a pattern. However, Morlet only provides us this kind of evidence for Latinized Germanic names, so we can't get to the Germanic form. We have therefore changed the given name to a Latinized spelling. [Adalulfa von der Helle, 08/00, A-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Irmele von Grünsberg, the first byname had been dropped in Kingdom because she had requested an authentic 15th century German name. While double bynames were not common in that area and time period they were used. [Irmele Schäfferin von Grünsberg, 03/01, A-Caid]
Submitted as Gottfried aus Mainz, no documentation was provided for the non-standard locative particle. We have therefore changed it to the common one. [Gottfried von Mainz, 05/01, A-Atlantia]
Submitted as Anna Katerina von Baden, she requested an authentic 12th century German name and stated that if it was necessary to drop one of the given names, she would prefer to drop Anna. As double given names were not used in that area and time period we have done so. [Katerina von Baden, 07/01, A-Atlantia]
The name was documented as having a Polish given name with an Italian byname, but no evidence was provided that Poland and Italy were in sufficient cultural contact that the combination is registerable. However, the given name seems not to be limited to Poland: for instance, it was borne by the daughter of Henry the Fat, Duke of Saxony, who later married Lothar II, Holy Roman Emperor. The contact between Germany and Italy was sufficient to allow registration. [Richenza d'Assisi, 07/01, A-Lochac]
Submitted as Elsa Lenore von der Movius, the name has two problems. Lenore appears to be an 18th century German literary invention; we have dropped it. The only documentation for von der Movius with the article and preposition is from a genealogy published in English; the College has had no opportunity to verify the quality of this source and the name is not attested with an article or preposition anywhere else. We have therefore dropped these. [Elsa Movius, 07/01, A-Outlands]

GRAMMAR

... there are no known examples of a patronymic ending in -ovna that do not immediately follow the given name. [Tatiana Gordeevna Kazimirova, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
The use of two given names is not a problem; Reaney and Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, list a number of feminine given names used as unmarked matronymics. [Christiana Ailitha, 09/99, A-Artemisia]
Submitted as Damaris St. Cloud, we do not register scribal abbreviations. [Damaris Saint Cloud, 10/99, A-Atenveldt]
The documentation for Xristiana, as confirmed by checking with Fause Lozenge, indicates that Xristiana is a scribal abbreviation, which we do not register. [Xristiana Fraser, 10/99, R-Calontir]
Submitted as Eliza O Coileain, while mixed Gaelic/English spellings are allowed, we still require that the grammar of the Gaelic patronymic be correct. We have therefore substituted an appropriate Anglicized form of the byname. [Eliza O'Culane, 11/99, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as St. Crispin, we do not register scribal abbreviations. [Saint Crispin, College of, 12/99, A-Lochac]
Submitted as the Order of the Gryphon's Eye, the apostrophe was not used until after period. [Artemisia, Kingdom of, 01/00, A-Artemisia]
As the submitter requested an authentic German name, the given name was changed in Kingdom to Kassandra. However, considering the variation in period spelling, the originally submitted Cassandra is equally acceptable, so we have changed the name back. The name may not be entirely authentic, though, since we did not find evidence that Cassandra with any spelling was used in Germany. [Cassandra vom Rhein, 06/00, A-Ansteorra]

HOUSEHOLD
see also BRANCH
see also ORDERS and AWARDS

[La Lancia della Casa Rosatti] We found evidence that "Lance" was a termed used in many places in Europe, including Italy, to describe a very small military group, and that Lancia is a valid Italian term. Therefore we are allowing it as a household designator. It is unclear if such groups had names (beyond the leader), but we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt. [Morgana Elisabetta Rosatti, 07/99, A-Caid]
[Clan Caer Lonn] The name mixes two languages, Welsh (Caer) and Gaelic (Lonn) in one phrase, violating rule III.1.a, "Linguistic Consistency." Brian should also be informed that Clans were named after personal names and nicknames, not places. Lastly we would prefer to see some evidence that "Strong" is a reasonable adjective to apply to keeps. [Brian Brock, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
[House Stirling Hart.] The examples cited in the documentation were insufficient to justify the use of a town in an inn name. [Madog Maelgwn ap Llywelyn, 08/99, R-Caid]
[House Open Hearth] No documentation was given to show that Open Hearth was a reasonable inn or sign name. Sign names of the form <adjective> <noun> tend to have adjectives that can be easily displayed on a sign. "Open" is not such an adjective when applied to hearths. [Jared the Potter and Sajah bint Habushun ibn Ishandiyar al-Hajjaj, 11/99, R-Atlantia]
[House of the Amber Moon] While the submitter did give evidence that amber was used as a color towards the end of our period (although only in a poem), she did not give any evidence showing that <color> Moon is a reasonable household name, i.e., a name consistent with some period organized group of people. [Zhivana Anastasiia Svemirovna, 12/99, R-Caid]
[Compagnie du Graal] This was pended to discuss whether a literary reference to the Knights of the Grail was important enough to protect. While I received little commentary, the evidence indicates that it is not. It is also true that there is a tradition of naming orders after important legendary artifacts, the most notable being the Order of the Golden Fleece. We therefore believe that such while such an order may imply a group intending to emulate the Arthurian knights, barring any notable actual Orders of the Grail, we must assume that they are not pretending to be the Arthurian knights. [Giovanni di Sienna, 01/00, A-Outlands]
[Thorne House] Conflict with Thornhold, registered to Ciorstan MacAmhlaidh. As hold is the designator, it does not contribute difference. [Yin Mei Li and Marie Lorraine de Montclair, 01/00, R-Artemisia]
The Administrative Handbook does limit joint registration to a "couple" but does not define the term (and the term is used very loosely, i.e., the rules do not specifically say that badges and household names can be registered by more than one individual, they just indicate how the name or badge should be referenced when registered by a couple). A couple does not require that the two people be of different sex, and as we do not inquire as to the exact relationship in general we do not do so here. We do, however, intend to alter the Administrative Handbook to be clearer on the issue and to allow registration of joint badge by any two (but no more than two) individuals. [Yin Mei Li and Marie Lorraine de Montclair, 01/00, R-Artemisia]
[Company of the Pembroke Luce] The documentation given did not show that <place name> <noun> or <surname> <noun> was a pattern given to organized groups in period. "Household names must follow the patterns of period names of organized groups of people. Possible models include Scottish clans (Clan Stewart), ruling dynasties (House of Anjou), professional guilds (Baker's Guild of Augsburg, Worshipful Company of Coopers), military units (The White Company), and inns (House of the White Hart)" [Conrad von Zuberbuehler, 02/00, R-Artemisia]
[Wælsinges Hus] ... submitted as Hûs Wælsinges … The argument was made that the submission conflicts with the Wælsinges of Beowulf, which indeed were used as documentation. However, they don't have their own entry in general encyclopaedias, and the opinion of the College was sufficiently mixed that we don't feel compelled to protect them despite this. A similar argument was made about the Volsunga. However, it does not matter whether they are important enough to protect, as translations of a name do not by default conflict with each other. We feel that the difference in this case is, while close to the limit, still significant enough. The documentation for the name is scanty, but the Wælsinges of Beowulf were human; also, Ekwall (s.n. Walsingham) notes that the names of Great and Little Walsingham in Norfolk are derived from the name. We have changed the word order and removed the modern vowel length mark to be consistent with period usage. [Lupus of Arundel, 04/00, A-Caid]
[Guardians of the Golden Grove] No evidence was provided either by the submitters or the College that this would follow any of the known period patterns for the names of fighting units. [Gyldenholt, Barony of, 06/00, R-Caid]
[House Wolfgang von Neunkirchen] No evidence was provided that ships in period were named after specific individuals. On the contrary, based on the knowledge we have, this seems not to have been the case. [Astrid Radulfsdottir, 07/00, R-Æthelmearc]
[Dragon's Bower] No evidence was provided that this is a reasonable construction for the name of an inn, or any other organized group of people. [Sile Linet O'Loughlin, 07/00, R-Meridies]
[Capella Sancti Thomi et Sanctae Mariae Magdalenae] The argument was made in commentary that a chapel is a building, not a group of people, and that it should therefore not qualify as an alternative for household. However, the Oxford English Dictionary lists, among other meanings of the word Chapel,
7. A choir or body of singers attached to a chapel (usually of a king or prince); 'now extended to mean the choir or the orchestra, or both, of a church or chapel, or other musical establishment sacred or secular' (Grove Dict. Music). Often in French form chapelle, Ger. kapelle, or It. capella.
The earliest dated example given for this meaning of chapel is from 1420. This leads us to believe the term can be used for organized groups of people and thus as an alternative for household. [Simon Justus, 09/00, A-Middle]
[House White Hart] The household name is in conflict with the inn of White Hart. While none of the real-world inns of that name is important enough to protect under our current rules, the one featured in Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart is. [Gisla Rodumna, 11/00, R-An Tir]
[Company of Pembroke] This conflicts with the borough of Pembroke, which has its own entry in the Encyclopædia Britannica. As this is a direct conflict, we are not at this time making a ruling whether Company of <Place> is registerable as a household name. Also, we wish to remind the College that for conflict purposes there are two kinds of names: personal and others. Household names, therefore, can conflict with place names, order names, or titles. [Conrad von Zuberbuehler, 02/01, R-Artemisia]
[Castle Newmarch] ... Castle is a valid household designator... [Gryffri de Newmarch, 03/01, A-Meridies]

HUNGARIAN

[Kér Béla] There is no evidence, and none could be found, that tribal names, such as Ker, were used in Hungarian names. [Kér Béla, 11/99, R-Outlands]

INDIAN

There are two problems with the name. First, we would like to see some evidence of interaction between 3rd through 6th century India and Europe. Second, it was the feelings of the College that Brahman denotes a high enough caste that the use of the name is presumptuous. We would need to see evidence that Brahman implied status no higher than gentry in Europe. [Madhu Brahman, 01/00, R-An Tir]
As we wrote in the July 2000 LoAR,
While we allow real-world name elements in SCA names without further documentation, this is restricted to cases where "such elements are not excessively obtrusive." Combining a Gaelic Irish given name with what appears to be a non-European surname falls afoul of this restriction.
Combining an English given name with a Hindi byname is no less obtrusive. [Margaret Singh, 02/01, R-Outlands]

IRISH and SCOTTISH
see also PRESUMPTION

[Clan Caer Lonn] The name mixes two languages, Welsh (Caer) and Gaelic (Lonn) in one phrase, violating rule III.1.a, "Linguistic Consistency." Brian should also be informed that Clans were named after personal names and nicknames, not places. Lastly we would prefer to see some evidence that "Strong" is a reasonable adjective to apply to keeps. [Brian Brock, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
The submitter should be informed that the use of is modern ... [Muirenn ní Ailbe, 08/99, A-Artemisia]
While there is little evidence for mixed Scots/Italian names, there is enough contact between the cultures for this to be allowable. It is, however, a "weirdness." For a fuller discussion, see the cover letter [Ed.: see COMPATIBLE (Language)]. [Laertes McBride, 08/99, A-Caid]
Submitted as Étain inghean uí Braonáin, the submitter requested an authentic form for 6th-12th century Ireland. Clan names of this type were not used in Ireland before the tenth century, but Harpy believes that Étain ingen uí B(h)róenáin is reasonable for the 10th through 12th century. The ‘h' is optional in Old Irish names - the name is still pronounced as lenited but not spelled that way. [Étain ingen uí Bróenáin, 08/99, A-East]
[Coinneach mac Dhomhnuill] This name is clear of both Conal Mac Dhómhnuill and Coinneach Ó Domhnail. Conal and Coinneach are significantly different in sound and spelling. Mac ‘son of' and O ‘descendant (grandson) of/of clan' refer to significantly different relationships and are therefore clear. [Coinneach mac Dhomhnuill, 09/99, A-Outlands]
Submitted as Maura MacLeod, no documentation was given showing that Maura was a period given name. The Irish Gaelic form Maire appeared so late in Irish as a solitary given name that we are doubtful that English diminutives appeared within our period. We therefore replaced the given name with a documented form. [Mary MacLeod, 10/99, A-Æthelmearc]
Arval Benicoeur's article, "Concerning the Names Iain, Ian, and Eoin" mentions the name Eithne ingen Iain i nOchtur Aird in a 12th century Irish Gaelic document. There are other references to Iain (as a genitive form), but they were part of religious names. Nevertheless given the single citation, combined with the fact that Iain is otherwise SCA compatible, we will registered names containing mac Iain or inghean Iain. [Gavin MacIain, 10/99, A-Ansteorra]
... the documentation for Banba indicates that it was used only as a place name or as the wife of a god. [Banba McGowen, 10/99, R-Calontir] [Ed.: Returned for lack of paperwork]
Submitted as Eliza O Coileain, while mixed Gaelic/English spellings are allowed, we still require that the grammar of the Gaelic patronymic be correct. We have therefore substituted an appropriate Anglicized form of the byname. [Eliza O'Culane, 11/99, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Ceara ingen Conaill, lenition was always explictily written for voiceless letters. [Ceara ingen Chonaill, 11/99, A-Caid]
Submitted as Sciath ingen Cuain, lenition was always explicitly written for voiceless letters. Therefore we have corrected the patronymic. [Sciath ingen Chuain, 11/99, A-Caid]
The dated documentation for Baildrin only lists it in the genitive form; however, no one could determine the nominative form and it is possible that the name was a foreign borrowing and has the same nominative as genitive form. Therefore, we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt. [Baildrin MacEinri, 11/99, A-East]
... no documentation was given, nor was any found, showing that Cait is a period diminutive. [Cait inghean ui Flannagain, 11/99, R-Artemisia] [Ed.: Returned for conflict]
Submitted as Duncan Alasdair MacRae, the name had two wierdnesses: mixing the Gaelic and English spellings, and using a double given name in Scots. Therefore, we have Anglicized the entire name. [Duncan Alastair MacRae, 12/99, A-Outlands]
[Culloch MacUalraig] The documentation for Culloch did not show that it was a given name. Not all names used after mac in Irish or Scottish Gaelic are given names. In this case Culloch appears to be a descriptive byname. [Culloch MacUalraig, 12/99, R-Caid]
No evidence was given, nor could any be found, to justify a byname meaning "wolf phantom". Bynames in Irish Gaelic were generally literal, as in F.ind, "fair", or Gabulfota, "long-legged." [Siobhán Faolscatha, 12/99, R-Caid]
Briana is SCA compatible. Submitted as Briana MacConmara, the surname is Gaelic, and, as such the gender of the patronymic is incorrect. If we corrected the gender of the patronymic, then the name would have two weirdnesses: mixed English and Gaelic orthographies and the use of an SCA compatible name. [Briana MacNamara, 01/00, A-Atlantia]
No evidence was given showing that Mungo was ever used except as a nickname of the 6th century saint. We will accept the documented devotional form Cosmungo, but not the name itself barring evidence of its use as a given name (and not a nickname) in period. [Mungo Amadan Mor, 01/00, R-West]
Submitted as Elspeth O'Seaghdha, while the mixture of Scots and Gaelic spelling is a weirdness and not returnable, if the byname is in Gaelic it must follow the rules of Gaelic grammar. Ó Seaghdha (or O'Seaghdha) cannot follow a feminine name. We have therefore Anglicized the byname. If she wants an entirely Irish name she could have Sibéal inghean uí Sheaghdha, where Sibéal is a Gaelic form of Elizabeth/Isabel. [Elspeth O'Shea, 02/00, A-Middle]
Ailionora and Caointiarn are both Irish feminine given names. We know of no examples of Irish names consisting of two given names. Nor can we make the second name a metronymic. There is no evidence that metronymics were used in Ireland; the only examples found involved genealogies of royalty whose claim to royalty involved descent through the female line. [Ailionora Caointiarn, 02/00, R-Atenveldt]
Maura is not justifiable as a period Irish name, as it is a diminutive of Maire, which did not appear in Ireland until the end of our period. There is a possible justification of Maura as a feminization of an 8th c. Frankish male name, but there are other problems. Morlet lists Maura to 739, while MacPharlain is first cited in 1385 (Black, s.n. MacFarlane). Thus the name would have two weirdnesses: the combination of French and Scots Gaelic and temporal incompatibility. [Maura MacPharlain, 02/00, R-Atlantia]
Submitted as Kára MacLeod, the submitter requested an authentic 10th century Scottish name. The name itself is a mix of a Norse name and a Scots spelling of a Gaelic patronymic derived from a Norse name. Scots did not appear as a separate language after the 10th century. Furthermore, the mixture of two spelling systems is not plausible for 10th century Scotland. While elements from Gaelic and Norse may have been used in a single name, the name itself would be written either entirely in Gaelic or Norse, although the same name could have been written in either language depending on the context. For registration we chose to make the name entirely Gaelic both because it is more "Scottish" and because the resulting name is closer in sound to the original. A fully Norse form would be Kára Ljótsdottír. [Cera ingen Leoid, 03/00, A-Meridies]
[Griffin of Lochlan] The submitter documented Lochlan as Scots Gaelic for Norway and thus requested the byname as a lingua anglica form. The problem is that Gaelic did not use bynames of the form "of <placename>." In Gaelic, nationality was shown by using an adjectival form, e.g., instead of "of Norway" they used "Norse". Thus, there is not a Gaelic version of the byname that can be translated. As the submitter allows no changes, we must return the name. Given that Griffin is English and Scots, we recommend two possibilities. If the submitter wants to be from Norway, a Scots form of the locative is of Norroway. If the submitter wants Lochlan, then Lachlann is a period Scots byname derived from the Gaelic given name Lachlan. Thus Griffin Lachlann would be registerable, but the name would mean either that Griffin was the son of Lachlann or, depending on the time, that Lachlann was an inherited surname. [Griffin of Lochlan, 03/00, R-Atlantia]
In Gaelic, the patronymic marker mac can only be used with a masculine name; this needs the feminine patronymic marker inghean instead. Additionally, Mairead is a 20th century form of the given name; the late period Máirghréad would be acceptable. [Mairead MacLabhrain, 03/00, R-Caid]
Submitted as Ewan MacLaren of Balquhidder, the point was made in commentary that Balquhidder figures prominently enough in the MacLaren history to be considered a clan seat. As such, while there is no clan title of MacLaren of Balquhidder, this byname would imply that the person belongs to the immediate family of the chief. Since dropping Balquhidder would result in a conflict with the already registered name of Eoin MacLaren, we have dropped MacLaren instead. [Ewan of Balquhidder, 04/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Cassandra Annabell O Seanacain, the name has two weirdnesses: the mixture of Gaelic and English spelling conventions and the use of two given names, particularly in an Irish context, where it is not allowed. It also used a masculine form of the patronymic with a feminine name. By Anglicizing the surname, we make this an English name for someone of Irish decent, making it registerable. [Cassandra Annabelle O Shannahan, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Fína ingen Áeda, the given name is only documented as Fíne. The example cited from the Academy of Saint Gabriel letter was a misreading of the listing for this name in Ó Corráin and Maguire, Irish Names. [Fíne ingen Áeda, 04/00, A-Middle]
This name has the weirdness of mixing English and Gaelic spelling plus the problem of two given names in Irish. Both problems could be solved by dropping Caitlin, but the submitter allowed no major changes. [Honor Caitlin nic Curtin, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
There are several problems with the name. Brenna is not Gaelic, but is justfiable as possibly Italian. This makes the name acceptable by itself, but not with the rest of the name. The mixture of English and Gaelic spellings in the name is a weirdness. Furthermore, there is no evidence of Scottish or Irish names with two given names, much less three. Also, there is no evidence of the use of Clan <X> in names. Lastly, the Macghie of MacKay implied that the submitter is the clan chief or the clan chief's daughter, which is presumptuous. The submitter should also be informed that Michaela is not Irish. [Brenna Michaela Sine Macghie of Clan MacKay, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Derdriu ingen Murcada , it was noted in commentary that Ó Corrain and Maguire indicate that Derdriu is mythological. However, Black, sub Deirdre , has Derdere, wife of Cospatric Earl in 1166; this leads us to believe that the name is registerable. We have lenited the patronymic, though, to match documentation and to make it grammatically correct. [Derdriu ingen Mhurchadha, 05/00, A-Middle]
[Dún na Laoich Ór] The name, meaning 'Fortress of the Golden Warriors,' isn't very plausible as a period Scots or Irish place name. Metron Ariston notes that the vast majority of place names beginning in Dun seem to be descriptive in nature, referring to a salient feature of the fort (e.g., its color or location). In a lesser number of cases, the Dun is combined with the name of an individual associated with the fort in history or legend. Relatively rare are names like Dumbarton deriving from groups of people (in this case from Dun Breatuin or Fort of the Britains) and even there we could not find any that do not use a proper noun. [Dún na Laoich Ór, Stronghold of, 05/00, R-An Tir]
... no difference is given from the change from ni to ingen. [Medb ingen Domnaill, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
... the construction of Clan X has been disallowed since June 1998. [Aeron Aschennen of Clan MacKenzie, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Falen MacFergus of Sligo, the submitter requested an authentic Anglicised Gaelic name. However, Faílenn was no longer used as a given name by the time names were Anglicised. We were therefore left with various choices. One, we could change the name to Old English orthography (giving something like Fælen); two, modern English orthography (Fallen, Fellen or something like that); or three, we could assume this is a 16th century revival of an ancient Irish name and Anglicise it according to the practice of that era. The third alternative sounds most appealing, given that the Society is interested in pre-17th century culture and that the submitter requested an English spelling, not Old English.

In Anglicising this name, we can follow the example of the surname O Faoileáin, cited in Woulfe and Anglicised c. 1600 to O Foylane and O Fylane. The Gaelic form has the genitive form of Faoileán, a name rather close to the submitted Faílenn, for which O Corráin and Maguire have a modern spelling of Faoileann. These are close enough that we feel comfortable in extrapolating from the Anglicised forms.

Based on these examples we have formed a hypothetical late 16th century anglicisation Fylan. It should be noted that even after Anglicisation the name is still pronounced Fee-l@n (in which the @ is intended to be upside-down e, or the so-called schwa vowel). [Fylan MacFergus of Sligo, 06/00, A-Atlantia]
Of the Scots variants of Alan, the -eyn spellings are all in French constructions and thus not be appropriate in a Gaelic byname construction. ... Either Alexandria nic Allayn or Alexandria Alleyn would be possible. [Alexandria nic Alleyn, 06/00, R-Calontir]
While there is no evidence that Niamh was actually used in period, it appears in period sagas, in some cases as the name of a human being. [Niamh ingen Maolán, 07/00, A-Meridies]
Submitted as Muirenn ingen Darragh, the byname mixed Anglicized and Gaelic spelling. As Bordure put it,
Woulfe (p. 494 s.n. Ó Dara) lists Darragh as a modern Anglicized form of the name. As such, using it with ingen violates RfS III.1.a, "Each phrase must be grammatically correct according to the usage of a single language."
[Muirenn ingen Dara, 08/00, A-Atlantia]
Submitted as Diarmuid de Rosas, this name had two separate problems. First, there was no evidence that the spelling Diarmuid was period. Second, and more importantly, mixed Irish / Spanish names are not allowed (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR of July 1997). [Diarmaid de Rossa, 11/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Flannait Sibéal Ni hIighnigh, we have no evidence that double given names were used in Gaelic names in period. We have therefore dropped the second given name, as well as changed the post-period to a period patronymic construct. [Flannait inghean uí hEighnigh, 12/00, A-Meridies]
Kinchyle appears to be the clan seat of the MacBean, so the two names cannot be combined in this manner. [Lachlan McBean of Kinchyle, 12/00, R-Atenveldt]
The documentation implies that the epithet refers uniquely to Ogma, champion to the Tuatha and, in some sense, the Irish analogue of Hercules. As such, it is not appropriate as a byname, so barring new evidence to the contrary we have to return it. [Ciarán Grianánach, 01/01, R-Caid]
The main question in this submission was how to represent the letter yogh. For most purposes within the College, Da'ud notation is likely to be used; in that notation, {gh} is the appropriate choice. [Effric Neyn Ken{gh}ocht Mcherrald, 05/01,A-West]
Submitted as Faílenn inghean Mheanmain of Ulster, the name had two weirdnesses: combining an Anglicised locative byname with Gaelic elements, and a temporal difference of several centuries between the given name and the patronymic. We have corrected the former by dropping the locative. Note that evidence suggests that Irish locative bynames were normally adjectives — that is, one would be called the Ulsterwoman instead of of Ulster. [Faílenn inghean Mheanmain, 06/01, A-Atlantia]
The submitter requested an authentic 16th century Gaelic name. We were not able to comply with this request: in fact, the College did not find evidence that the given name was used later than 8th century. While we consider a temporal disparity of eight centuries a weirdness we do not consider it sufficient reason to return the name. [Rónán mac an Stalcair, 07/01, A-Atlantia]
Submitted as Caiterína ingen Máirgréc, the question was raised whether Irish metronymic bynames are registerable. They have been ruled unregisterable as recently as February 2000, for the reason that There are no known examples of metronymics in Gaelic names outside of two examples both involving royalty whose claim to the throne was through the female line.

However, recent evidence provided by Orle suggests that the situation is not quite that simple. People other than royalty were occasionally identified by their female ancestors: the Annals of Connacht have, for example, clann ingine Eogain the sons of Eogan's daughter and Sida Occ mac ingini h. Dubidir Sida Oc, the son of O Duibidir's daughter; the Annals of the Four Masters have, for instance, Mac Con Mara .i. mac inghene Uí Dálaigh Mac Namara (i.e. the son of O'Daly's daughter) and Brian mac an Chalbhaigh Uí Chonchobhair & Mairgrege Brian, the son of Calvagh O'Conor, by Margaret.

Based on this new evidence we feel that a properly constructed Irish metronymic should be considered a weirdness instead of reason for a return by itself. An unmarked metronymic is still unregisterable. She asked for an authentic 10th century Irish name, but we were not able to comply with this request without changing the byname entirely. Instead, we have changed the metronymic to the grammatically correct form. We have also changed the spelling of the metronymic particle to make the name temporally consistent, since using an early form of the particle (as submitted) with a name that is only dated to late period would make the name unregisterable. [Caiterína inghean Mháirgrége, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Submitted as Donnchad na Atholl, the byname had a Gaelic locative particle with an Anglicized place name. Since each name element must be consistent with a single language, we have dropped the particle. [Donnchad Atholl, 07/01, A-Calonitr]
Submitted as Finé Eilidh Macrennie, no evidence has been found for double given names in Gaelic. We have therefore dropped the second given name. [Finé Macrennie, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Submitted as Sorcha Mhaoláin, the byname had a particle that was only used in an Anglicized context with a Gaelic-form name. We have changed the byname to an entirely Gaelic form. [Sorcha inghean uí Mhaoláin, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Gearasdan garrison appears to be a loan word from English. The College found only one instance of this word in 1598, but there is no evidence that it was used in period place names and some doubt as to whether the word itself was used at that time to refer to a physical structure. The most typical way to say what the submitters want would be Dun an Óir, but unfortunately there is already a Barony of Dun Or.

The submitters might consider either caiseal or ráth, both meaning ring fort; either Caiseal na Óir or Ráth na Óir would be reasonable place names with a meaning very close to that desired. [An Gearasdan Òir, Stronghold of, 07/01, R-An Tir]
While the given name appears in Ó Corráin and Maguire's Irish Names, they say that The only bearer of this name was Caireen Chasdubh ('of the dark curly hair'), daughter of the king of the Britons, and mother of Niall of the Nine Hostages, legendary ancestress of the high-kings of Ireland. Because of this, the name has already been ruled unregisterable in August 1991. [Cairenn inghean Dubhthaigh, 07/01, R-Calontir]
While the given name appears in Ó Corráin and Maguire's Irish Names, they say it comes from mythology, the wife of the sea-god Manannán mac Lir. Barring evidence that the name was used by humans in period we have to return this. In addition to this, the byname is in a masculine form, inappropriate with a feminine given name. [Fand Mac Cailin, 07/01, R-Calontir]

ITALIAN

The preposition was changed from di to da, which is the appropriate preposition for locatives. [Ermellina da Urbino, 07/99, A-East]
While there is little evidence for mixed Scots/Italian names, there is enough contact between the cultures for this to be allowable. It is, however, a "weirdness." For a fuller discussion, see the cover letter [Ed.: See COMPATIBLE (Language)]. [Laertes McBride, 08/99, A-Caid]
An Italian-English name combination is a weirdness (barring evidence of such combinations in period) but acceptable. [Veronica de Holloway, 09/99, A-Artemisia]
[Mercedes] The submitter documented the given name from De Felice, I Nomi Degli Italiani; however, De Felice notes that Mercedes entered Italy from Spain. Because Mercedes is not found in Spain until well after 1600, the name could not have been found in period Italy. [Mercedes Amici, 01/00, R-Æthelmearc]
Submitted as Beatrice Domènici della Campana, the accent was not used in period; modern authors such as de Felice use them as pronunciation guides. [Beatrice Domenici della Campana, 03/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Sofia Augusta di Livorno , we have changed the preposition. Until someone provides evidence to the contrary, we are working under the assumption that Italian locative bynames use the preposition da. [Sofia Augusta da Livorno, 05/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Giulia Maddalena Sardone di Nicolo. As Kraken put it,
In Italian, by the time that we find (a) double given names and (b) faimly [sic] surnames, I would expect the direct patronymic to have disappeared. On the other hand, given patronymic surname is unexceptional. Adding the double given name is a weirdness, ...
We have therefore changed the order of the patronymic and the surname. [Giulia Maddalena di Nicolo Sardone, 08/00, A-Caid]
As the submitter states, Chavalerio is an occupational byname meaning Knight. It is, therefore, presumptuous according to section VI.1 of the Rules for Submissions. [Rizardo Chavalerio, 05/01, R-Artemisia]
Submitted on the LoI as Alessandra di Vieri, the particle was added in Kingdom. Since an unmarked surname would be fine in late period and since she requested a late name, we have changed the name back to the originally submitted form. [Alessandra Vieri, 07/01, A-Atlantia]
Accents appear in de Felice's Dizionario dei cognomi italiani, but they are simply to help with pronunciation. They are not used in Italian spelling. [Beatrice da Palermo, 07/01, A-Calontir]
The name was documented as having a Polish given name with an Italian byname, but no evidence was provided that Poland and Italy were in sufficient cultural contact that the combination is registerable. However, the given name seems not to be limited to Poland: for instance, it was borne by the daughter of Henry the Fat, Duke of Saxony, who later married Lothar II, Holy Roman Emperor. The contact between Germany and Italy was sufficient to allow registration. [Richenza d'Assisi, 07/01, A-Lochac]

JAPANESE

No evidence was given to indicate that Asagiri, meaning "Morning fog", is a reasonable surname, which are primarily based on geographical features, not weather phenomenon. Furthermore the submitter's given name was incorrectly spelled as Tetsuo instead of Tatsuo. While not a reason for return, the submitter should be informed that men in the samurai class invariably has a nanori as well as a surname and given name. [Asagiri Tetsuo, 10/99, R-Atlantia]

LATIN

There was no documentation indicating that a byname which is possibly justifiable in Middle English could be used for a Latin byname. [Andronicus Ursacor, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
In Latin contexts Panthera would have been a cognomen, roughly equivalent to a byname. No evidence was provided that it was used as a given name; we therefore have to return this. [Panthera Kallista, 07/01, R-Calontir]

LEGAL NAME ALLOWANCE

DeWayne is the submitter's middle name, not his given name. A Middle name is treated by type: if it is structurally a given name it can be used as a given name, but if it is structurally a surname it can only be used as a surname. DeWayne is structurally a surname so cannot be used as a given name. [DeWayne of Locks, 10/99, R-Calontir]
His legal name is Jeffrey Montgomery; your primary persona name must differ at least slightly from your legal name. [Geoffrey Montgomery, 04/00, R-Æthelmearc]
While we allow real-world name elements in SCA names without further documentation, this is restricted to cases where "such elements are not excessively obtrusive." Combining a Gaelic Irish given name with what appears to be a non-European surname falls afoul of this restriction. [Ciarmhac Sayenga, 07/00, R-Æthelmearc]
The submission consists of the given names, in order, of the submitter. As this is one of the possible common use names, we have to return this submission for conflict against the submitter herself, protected under section III.A.9 of the Administrative Handbook. [Mary Amanda, 09/00, R-Artemisia]
As we wrote in the July 2000 LoAR,
While we allow real-world name elements in SCA names without further documentation, this is restricted to cases where "such elements are not excessively obtrusive." Combining a Gaelic Irish given name with what appears to be a non-European surname falls afoul of this restriction.
Combining an English given name with a Hindi byname is no less obtrusive. [Margaret Singh, 02/01, R-Outlands]
Liora is her modern Hebrew given name; such names were ruled registerable under the legal name allowance by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme in September 1992. [Liora eishet Yehoshua, 04/01, A-Middle]

LOCATIVES and PLACE NAMES

Avalon is acceptable only because there is a place in France named Avallon; the place from Arthurian legend is not a reasonable place to be from. [Rowena of Avalon, 08/99, A-Artemisia]
The preposition was changed from di to da, which is the appropriate preposition for locatives. [Ermellina da Urbino, 07/99, A-East]
No one was able to find documentation that -rest was used as an element in place names. [see LoAR for complete discussion of hypothetical use of "rest"] [Dragon's Rest, Shire of, 08/99, R-Artemisia]
No evidence was given to show that a locative taken from a river name is a valid byname in either Norse or Russian. [Bjorn of the Kuma, 08/99, R-Caid]
No one could come up with reasonable justification for this as a place name, and some commenters were bothered by the connotation of "Red Light District." [Luminaire Rouge, Canton de la, 08/99, R-Caid]
This name is returned because no documentation can be found for the name de Compostela. People from Santiago de Compostela were known as de Santiago. [Livia Teresa de Compostela, 09/99, R-Atlantia]
Submitted as Damaris St. Cloud, we do not register scribal abbreviations. [Damaris Saint Cloud, 10/99, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Anastasia of Whispering Oaks, no evidence was presented, nor was any found, that Whispering is an adjective used in place names in period. [Anastasia of the Oaks, 10/99, A-East]
... we would need to see documentation showing that Locks can be used with the preposition of. [DeWayne of Locks, 10/99, R-Calontir]
[Foxrun] No evidence was provided, and no one could find any, that -run is a reasonable terminal element to combine with Fox-. The element -run does not refer to where something runs or is hunted. [Mirabel of Foxrun, 10/99, R-East]
Reaney and Wilson, Dictionary of English Surnames lists examples of de la/del North<object>; for example, they list a William de la Northalle in 1280 and a Henry del Northeclif in 1307. Therefore we will allow the article in the name. [Paulina of the Northwood, 11/99, A-Trimaris]
[Gwendolyn of the Isle of Wight] No evidence was given to show that of the Isle of Wight, as opposed to of Wight was a reasonable form of the locative. The locative itself is dated to 1332 in Reaney and Wilson, Dictionary of English Names in the form de Wight. [Gwendolyn of the Isle of Wight, 11/99, R-Meridies]
[Dragonhurst] No evidence was supplied that Dragon- was a period element in placenames. Drakehurst would be significantly more authentic. Nevertheless, a cursory search found over 30 SCA names with Dragon-<X> as locatives. Therefore Dragonhurst is SCA compatible. [Anne of Dragonhurst, 02/00, A-Middle]
Lyonesse exists only in legend and is thus not a place anyone would describe themselves as being from. [Guinevere of Lyonesse, 03/00, R-Caid] [Ed.: Registered on appeal, 03/01, A-Caid]
While no hard evidence was supplied that the name of Palestine — as opposed to the place itself — is period, Kenneth Nebenzahl, Maps of the Holy Land, has several 16th century maps showing the Latin form Palestina. [Michael of Palestine, 06/00, A-Calontir]
Submitted as Silka of the Lost Woods, there was no evidence that the Lost Woods would be a reasonable place name. However, Ekwall (s.n. Lostwithiel) dates Lostwetell to 1194 and Lostwhidiel to 1269 and says of this name "The name goes with Witheil SW. of Bodmin ... and Lostwithiel would be 'the end (lit. the tail) of Withiel'. Co lost means 'a tail'." Lostwode would thus seem a plausible hypothetical place name, although with a different meaning than intended. [Silka of Lostwode, 06/00, A-Calontir]
No documentation was provided to demonstrate that Wyvernskeep is a reasonably constructed placename. The College could not provide such evidence either. [Edward of Wyvernskeep, 06/00, R-Calontir]
[Kegs End] Submitted as Keg's End, Smith, English Place-Name Elements, under ende lists Sewards End. Forming a hypothetical place name in the form <surname>s + End seems therefore reasonable. We have, however, removed the apostrophe, to conform with period usage. [Briged O'Daire, 07/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Pasche Starling of Mayfair, the byname had a problem. In the June 1999 return of Kerri Stirling of Mayfaire Laurel wrote:
No documentation was presented, and none could be found for Mayfaire as a period place. Without such documentation the name cannot be registered. We would have dropped it in order to register the rest of the name, but the submitter did not allow major changes, and dropping an element such as Mayfaire is a major change. Therefore, we are returning it.
No such documentation was provided this time either, so we have dropped the element. [Pasche Starling, 10/00, A-Artemisia]
[Lyonesse] This was an appeal of the March 2000 return. At that time Laurel gave the reason for the return as
Lyonesse exists only in legend and is thus not a place anyone would describe themselves as being from.
However, RfS II.3 states that New name elements, whether invented by the submitter or borrowed from a literary source, may be used if they follow the rules for name formation from a linguistic tradition compatible with the domain of the Society and the name elements used. Examples given in the section include place names.

The submission cites Watson's History of the Celtic Place-Names of Scotland and Johnston's Place-Names of Scotland to show that Lyonesse is possibly a variant of Lothian. While this etymology is uncertain it does suffice to show that the name has been formed in a manner compatible with the relevant linguistic tradition.

Furthermore, the submission follows the guidelines for using literary names given by Jaelle of Armida, then Laurel, in the 28 February 1999 LoAR cover letter: first, the submitter used the Arthur mythos as a last resort; second, Lyonesse is a place inhabited by humans; third, the name is not allegorical; and fourth, it is not a minor name from a minor work. [Guinevere of Lyonesse, 03/01, A-Caid]
Submitted on the LoI as Uther of Southolt, the byname was changed to that form in kingdom. While that spelling is more likely, members of the College were able to document the occasional use of -hold in period spelling. [Uther of Southold, 06/01, A-Æthelemearc]
Submitted as Margaret of Catteshull in Meriden, no documentation was provided for using two locative bynames in this manner, or for a locative byname derived from a complex place name like Catteshull in Meriden. We have changed the first byname to an inherited surname. [Margaret Catteshull of Meriden, 07/01, A-Atlantia]
Submitted as Donnchad na Atholl, the byname had a Gaelic locative particle with an Anglicized place name. Since each name element must be consistent with a single language, we have dropped the particle. [Donnchad Atholl, 07/01, A-Calonitr]
Gearasdan garrison appears to be a loan word from English. The College found only one instance of this word in 1598, but there is no evidence that it was used in period place names and some doubt as to whether the word itself was used at that time to refer to a physical structure. The most typical way to say what the submitters want would be Dun an Óir, but unfortunately there is already a Barony of Dun Or.

The submitters might consider either caiseal or ráth, both meaning ring fort; either Caiseal na Óir or Ráth na Óir would be reasonable place names with a meaning very close to that desired. [An Gearasdan Òir, Stronghold of, 07/01, R-An Tir]

MONGOL

According to Pennon, Avarga may very well mean 'Giant' or 'Big One' in Modern Mongolian, specifically the Khalkhan dialect; also, this fits the pattern of elements used in Mongol naming practices. Unfortunately, however, this would not be the word used in period. The Khalkhan dialect has changed the spelling of some original words and time has added not only words but letters to the language. V is not found in Mongol words prior to 1206 when Genghis Khan ordered the use of the Uighur script for writing Mongolian. Its use came in with the importing of words from other cultures and did not find its way into Mongolian names until after period.

The word the submitter is looking for is Yeke. Meaning literally 'great' it is used as a synonym for 'big' and 'large' also. There are several instances of its use as a personal name element in period. In the Index of the Secret History of the Mongols, translated by Francis Woodman Cleaves (Professor Emeritus of Harvard University) there are 6 instances of Yeke: Yeke Barula, Yeke Cheren, Yeke Chiledü, Yeke Nerghürin, and Yeke Nidün.

The spelling of Chagaadai is modern - a good attempt, but modern none the less. As the submitter allows minor changes, we would have changed it to Chaghadai; however, the change from Avarga to Yeke is far too major for us to make. [Avarga Chagaadai, 04/00, R-Æthelmearc]
Submitted as Teh-Mu-Ginn Burgud Jerekh, the question was raised whether Temugin was a restricted name. However, the March 1998 registration of Timujin Timortologai overturned that precedent after considering new evidence. However, no evidence was given for using hyphens in the transliteration. We have changed the spelling to a likely period one. [Tehmuginn Burgudjerekh, 11/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Uriangqadai Cinoajin, no evidence was provided that the byname should precede the given name in Mongol names. We have therefore changed the order of the name elements. We have also added the accent to the given name to match the transliteration used in the submitted documentation. [Cinoajin Uriangqadai, 04/01, A-Ansteorra]

NORSE

There is no documentation indicating that "strong merchant-ship" is a reasonable epithet in Norse. We could not register the name as Magnús Thorvaldsson ... because it would then conflict with the already registered name Magnus Torvaldson. [Magnús balliknarr Thorvaldsson, 07/99, R-Atlantia]
No evidence was given to show that a locative taken from a river name is a valid byname in either Norse or Russian. [Bjorn of the Kuma, 08/99, R-Caid]
We are returning the name because the word drakkar has not been documented as a Norse (or any Scandanavian) word. It appears that the word was not used in period. Lind (Norsk-Isländska Personinamn från Medeltiden, col. 202) shows the late medieval personal name Draki with a genitive form Draks so Draksfjord looks to be a likely name. [Drakkarfjord, Canton of, 08/99, R-Lochac]
Ravenlocks does not follow any pattern for Norse names; "raven" refers only to the bird. [Astrid Ravenlocks Thorvaldsdottir, 10/99, R-Meridies]
Submitted as Hrothgar Hrothgarsson, Hrothgar is the Anglo-Saxon form of the name so cannot be used with Norse grammar. [Hróðgierr Hróðgierson, 02/00, A-Artemisia]
There is no evidence that Volsung was ever used outside of legend. [Ingunn Völsungsdöttir, 02/00, R-Meridies]
Submitted as Kára MacLeod, the submitter requested an authentic 10th century Scottish name. The name itself is a mix of a Norse name and a Scots spelling of a Gaelic patronymic derived from a Norse name. Scots did not appear as a separate language after the 10th century. Furthermore, the mixture of two spelling systems is not plausible for 10th century Scotland. While elements from Gaelic and Norse may have been used in a single name, the name itself would be written either entirely in Gaelic or Norse, although the same name could have been written in either language depending on the context. For registration we chose to make the name entirely Gaelic both because it is more "Scottish" and because the resulting name is closer in sound to the original. A fully Norse form would be Kára Ljótsdottír. [Cera ingen Leoid, 03/00, A-Meridies]
Submitted as Emma inn Draumspaki, we have changed the gender of the byname to match the given and changed it to lowercase to match conventional Old Norse spelling. [Emma in draumspaka, 04/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Gunnarr Egilsson av Uppsala, the submitter is interested in an authentic 8th–10th century Norse name. However, this would be inconsistent with the locative byname, as the name of Uppsala is several centuries and linguistic changes younger. We have dropped the locative to get Gunnarr Egilsson, which is a plausible Viking-era name; Gunnar Egilsson av Uppsala would be a fine medieval Swedish one. [Gunnarr Egilsson, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
The submitter is interested in an authentic 10th–11th century Norse name, so we have changed the name from medieval Swedish to Viking-era Norse by adding one r to the given name. [Gunnarr Einarsson, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Freydís Sigurðardóttir in tryggva , we have switched the elements to the correct order: given name + descriptive byname + patronymic byname. [Freydís in tryggva Sigurðardóttir, 05/00, A-Middle]
Unfortunately for the submitter, Geirr Bassi does not actually say that all Old Norse male names can be feminized. His example of Helgi ~ Helga is especially irrelevant in this case since Helgi is a weak masculine and Háleygr is a strong one; that is, their declinations are quite different. Since none of our sources show a feminine form of Háleygr or a pattern of similar feminizations we have to return this.

The submitter should know that metronymics, like the submitted one (which would be grammatically correct as Ólöfardóttir), were extremely rare in the Viking culture. Essentially, a metronymic byname signifies not only a bastard but one whose father is not even known. She might consider the similar-sounding patronymic Óláfsdóttir instead. [Haleya Olofsdottir, 07/00, R-Atenveldt]
Contrary to what the submitter thinks, -rún is not simply a feminine suffix. It is rather a deuterotheme meaning, roughly, 'secret'. Adding it to the compound name Snæúlfr would result in a three-part compound name, for which we do not have evidence. [Snæúlfrún Rauðúlfsdottir, 07/00, R-Atlantia]
The byname Kálsvísa, justified as a kenning based on the name of a legendary horse, has serious problems. No evidence was submitted that proper names appeared as kennings, that is, allusive names used primarily in scaldic poetry; the most the College could find was that names were used as parts of kennings. Furthermore, the argument presented in the submission does not address the issue of whether Kálsvísa as a name refers to a particular legendary individual in such a way that its use should be prohibited. It is also unclear whether the byname is a claim to superhuman powers and therefore presumptuous. [Kormákr Kálsvísa, 08/00, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Smiðr-Hákon blánef, he desired an authentic Norse name. Since the College could not find evidence of using both an occupational and descriptive byname in that culture we have dropped the first byname. [Hákon blánef, 04/01, A-Drachenwald]

ORDERS and AWARDS
see also Branch
see also Household

Submitted as Order of the Golden Swans of Aneala, there is no evidence of plural nouns used in order names in period, with the exception of the word "knights." [Aneala, Barony of, 07/99, A-Lochac]
[Order of the Dragon's Pheon] This name is being returned because it does not follow period style of order names, nor does it follow the pattern of previous order names of the barony. ... Dragon's is not a reasonable adjective to modify a pheon. [Dragonsspine, Barony of, 08/99, R-Outlands]
Submitted as an order name, Company is a designator that applies only to household names. [Dun Carraig, Barony of, 10/99, A-Atlantia]
[Order of the Caltrop] The name conflicts with Caltrop Pursuivant, which is registered to the Kingdom of Calontir. Æthelmearc has a letter to conflict from the King and Queen of Calontir. However, current practice allows someone owning Order of the X to use X Pursuivant and vice versa. Therefore two such items are effectively identical. Since we cannot register two identical items even with permission, the order name must be returned. [Æthelmearc, Kingdom of, 10/99, R-Æthelmearc]
[Order of the Mountain Hart] No evidence was given that "mountain" is a reasonable adjective to apply to a hart. While there are no doubt harts in the mountains, we know of no particular mountain variety. [Highland Foorde, Barony of, 10/99, R-Atlanita]
[Order of the Mountain Hawk] No evidence was given that "mountain" is a reasonable adjective to apply to a hawk. [Highland Foorde, Barony of, 10/99, R-Atlanita]
[Order of the Mountain Lark] No evidence was given that "mountain" is a reasonable adjective to apply to a lark. [Highland Foorde, Barony of, 10/99, R-Atlanita]
[Order of Manus] The name "of hand" does not make any sense and does not follow any pattern for order names. Either Order of the Hand or Ordo Manus would be acceptable, barring conflicts. [Ealdormere, Kingdom of, 10/99, R-Ealdormere]
[Order of the Serpent's Fang] No evidence was presented that fang meant "tooth" in period. Barring conflict, the Order of the Serpents Tooth would be acceptable. [Calafia, Barony of, 11/99, R-Caid] [Ed.: This was appealed 07/00; the return was upheld]
[Defender of Darkwater] This name has no designator, such as Order or Award. It needs a designator to be registerable, under RfS III.2.b. Note that it is appropriate to name someone the Defender of Darkwater without registering the name; it is a reasonable generic description similar to Champion. [Darkwater, Barony of, 11/99, R-Trimaris]
[Award of the Indigo Mountain] Indigo was not used as an adjective in period, nor was it used as a color until 1622. [Hidden Mountain, Barony of, 12/99, R-Atlantia]
[Order of the Griffin's Flame] A flame is not an attribute associated with a griffin, therefore we need to see evidence that Griffin's Flame is a reasonable name for an order. [Avacal, Principality of, 01/00, R-An Tir]
[Order of the Gaudium Alces] First, the grammar is incorrect — the name should be Gaudium Alcis. More importantly no evidence was given, nor could any be found, to indicate that "Joy of the Moose" matched any known naming pattern for order names. [Arn Hold, Barony of, 01/00, R-Artemisia]
[Award of the Sapphire] This name does not conflict with the personal name Sapphyra (registered August 1971), because personal names do not conflict with order names. [Middle Kingdom, 02/00, A-Middle]
[Middle Kingdom Archers] This name is too generic to register by itself, although it could be used as an identifier for a badge. [Middle Kingdom, 02/00, R-Middle]
Champion of Arts and Sciences is a generic descriptor and need not be registered. [Avacal, Principality of, 03/00, A-An Tir]
[Order of the Radiance of Starkhafn] No evidence was given, nor could any be found, showing that the word Radiance existed before 1600. Moreover, it is too abstract to be a reasonable order name. The documentation cited by the submitter does not date the Order of Silence to period, and even then it is difficult to extrapolate from a single example. [Starkhafn, Barony of, 03/00, R-Caid]
[Companionate of the Meridian Queen's Rapier Champion] The name is too generic to register. Note that Meridies can have a Queen's Rapier Champion, and can even have a companionate of former champions, but the name Queen's Rapier Champion cannot be protected. [Meridies, Kingdom of, 03/00, R-Meridies]
[L'Ordre de l'Hèrme d'Or] An OED citation for the English herm is not sufficient to document the French hèrme. Even if the word were documented as a period French word, we would have the problem that hèrme seems too specific to be used in an order name — Order of the Statue would be fine but Order of the Statue of Hermes much less so. [Blatha an Oir, Barony of, 04/00, R-An Tir]
[Order of the Defender of Darkwater] This conflicts with the already registered names Order of the Defenders of Mons Tonitrus and Order of the Defenders of the West. Also, while such order names have been registered in the past it is not clear that this construction follows real-world examples. [Darkwater, Barony of, 06/00, R-Trimaris]
[Order of the Serpent's Fang] While fang was indeed used in period, it seems to have been applied only to canine animals. No new evidence was provided that a serpent's fang follows period patterns for order names — or even that it would have been a meaningful concept in period. We therefore have to deny the appeal. [Calafia, Barony of, 07/00, R-Caid]
[Order of the Argent Slipper] Meridies already has several order names of the type Argent X, so this particular use is grandfathered to the Kingdom. [Meridies, Kingdom of, 08/00, A-Meridies]
[Award of the Little Griffin] No evidence was provided that this name would conform to period patterns of order names. As the College could not find such evidence either, we have to return this. [Avacal, Principality of, 09/00, R-An Tir]
[The Order of Artist] This does not follow known period examples of order names. While orders were named after saints, as the submitters note, the order name is consistently formed from the saint's given name. We were unable to find any period order names that were formed from a byname or occupation. [One Thousand Eyes, Barony of, 10/00, R-Artemisia]
[The Order of the Wellspring] This does not follow known period examples of order names. The argument made on the LoI was that a wellspring was a possible heraldic charge. While this argument has some merit in that some order names come from items that could be heraldic charges, it also fails in that a wellspring is not a heraldic charge. It is a special type of stream, not easily depicted as a distinct entity different from a regular stream. [One Thousand Eyes, Barony of, 10/00, R-Artemisia]
[Order of the Silver Stars of Mons Tonitrus] By the precedent set in the July 1997 LoAR, plural nouns are not allowed in order names. Also, according to RfS V.2.a, names of SCA branches are not descriptive elements; they are therefore invisible when determining whether a conflict exists. This name therefore conflicts with the US military decoration of Silver Star. While we do not intend to protect every military decoration, this is one of the few that is well enough known and prestigious enough to warrant protection. [Mons Tonitrus, Barony of, 11/00, R-Atenveldt]
[Order of the Gilded Antelope] No documentation was submitted for the construction of this order name — it is not sufficient to show that the individual words were used in period, one must demonstrate that the overall name is formed in a period manner as well. As the College did not provide such evidence either we have to return this. [Dun Or Barony of, 03/01, R-Caid]
[Order of the Tower's Keystone] No evidence was provided for the construction Order of the X's Y. Since the College could not provide such evidence either, we have to return this. [Lonely Tower, Barony of the, 07/01, R-Calontir]

PATRONYMIC and MATRONYMIC

... there are no known examples of a patronymic ending in -ovna that do not immediately follow the given name. [Tatiana Gordeevna Kazimirova, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
The submitter should be informed that the use of is modern... [Muirenn ní Ailbe, 08/99, A-Artemisia]
The use of two given names is not a problem; Reaney and Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, list a number of feminine given names used as unmarked matronymics. [Christiana Ailitha, 09/99, A-Artemisia]
Mac ‘son of' and O ‘descendant (grandson) of/of clan' refer to significantly different relationships and are therefore clear. [Coinneach mac Dhomhnuill, 09/99, A-Outlands]
... there is no evidence that unmarked patronymics were used in Old English names. [Æðelwulf Omundes sunu, 11/99, A-Trimaris]
[Culloch MacUalraig] The documentation for Culloch did not show that it was a given name. Not all names used after mac in Irish or Scottish Gaelic are given names. In this case Culloch appears to be a descriptive byname. [Culloch MacUalraig, 12/99, R-Caid]
Briana is SCA compatible. Submitted as Briana MacConmara, the surname is Gaelic, and, as such the gender of the patronymic is incorrect. If we corrected the gender of the patronymic, then the name would have two weirdnesses: mixed English and Gaelic orthographies and the use of an SCA compatible name. [Briana MacNamara, 01/00, A-Atlantia]
This byname is justifiable as a patronymic surname derived from True Mark. Surnames derived in the same way, including Jolirobin, Godedick, and Litelwatte, are found in Reaney, The Origin of English Surnames. [Andras Truemark, 02/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Ailesh nic Rose ni Malone, the submitter requested and authentic 11th century Irish name meaning "Ailesh, daughter of Rose of the clan Malone." ... there is no evidence that metronymics were used in Ireland; the only examples found involved genealogies of royalty whose claim to royalty involved descent through the female line. [Alis ni Malone, 02/00, A-Ansteorra]
Ailionora and Caointiarn are both Irish feminine given names. We know of no examples of Irish names consisting of two given names. Nor can we make the second name a metronymic. There is no evidence that metronymics were used in Ireland; the only examples found involved genealogies of royalty whose claim to royalty involved descent through the female line. [Ailionora Caointiarn, 02/00, R-Atenveldt]
Both 'Inan and Nihlah are Arabic feminine given names, but there is no evidence that Arabic names were formed of two given names. As they did not use metronymics we could not fix this by making the second name a metronymic. ['Inan Nihlah, 02/00, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Roscelin the Silversmith's Daughter, no one was able to find evidence of patronymics formed in such a manner. We therefore changed the patronymic to a form consistent with a form found in 1379: Agnes Taylour-doghter (Bardsley, Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, s.n. Taylorson). [Roscelin Silversmith-doghter, 03/00, A-An Tir]
In Gaelic, the patronymic marker mac can only be used with a masculine name; this needs the feminine patronymic marker inghean instead. [Mairead MacLabhrain, 03/00, R-Caid]
... no difference is given from the change from ni to ingen. [Medb ingen Domnaill, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
The submitter should know that metronymics, like the submitted one (which would be grammatically correct as Ólöfardóttir), were extremely rare in the Viking culture. Essentially, a metronymic byname signifies not only a bastard but one whose father is not even known. She might consider the similar-sounding patronymic Óláfsdóttir instead. [Haleya Olofsdottir, 07/00, R-Atenveldt] [Ed.: Returned for lack of documentation of Haleya]
Submitted as Onóra nic Catháin, nic only appears in Anglicised spellings. As we do not allow mixed-spelling name elements we have changed the patronymic (and thus the entire name) to be consistently Gaelic. [Onóra inghean mhic Catháin, 08/00, A-Meridies]
Submitted as Siobán Ó Fidhne, the name had a feminine given name and a masculine form of the patronymic. We have changed the name to be entirely feminine. [Siobán inghean uí Fhidhne, 12/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Caiterína ingen Máirgréc, the question was raised whether Irish metronymic bynames are registerable. They have been ruled unregisterable as recently as February 2000, for the reason that There are no known examples of metronymics in Gaelic names outside of two examples both involving royalty whose claim to the throne was through the female line.

However, recent evidence provided by Orle suggests that the situation is not quite that simple. People other than royalty were occasionally identified by their female ancestors: the Annals of Connacht have, for example, clann ingine Eogain the sons of Eogan's daughter and Sida Occ mac ingini h. Dubidir Sida Oc, the son of O Duibidir's daughter; the Annals of the Four Masters have, for instance, Mac Con Mara .i. mac inghene Uí Dálaigh Mac Namara (i.e. the son of O'Daly's daughter) and Brian mac an Chalbhaigh Uí Chonchobhair & Mairgrege Brian, the son of Calvagh O'Conor, by Margaret.

Based on this new evidence we feel that a properly constructed Irish metronymic should be considered a weirdness instead of reason for a return by itself. An unmarked metronymic is still unregisterable.

She asked for an authentic 10th century Irish name, but we were not able to comply with this request without changing the byname entirely. Instead, we have changed the metronymic to the grammatically correct form. We have also changed the spelling of the metronymic particle to make the name temporally consistent, since using an early form of the particle (as submitted) with a name that is only dated to late period would make the name unregisterable. [Caiterína inghean Mháirgrége, 07/01, A-Calontir]
Submitted as Sorcha Mhaoláin, the byname had a particle that was only used in an Anglicized context with a Gaelic-form name. We have changed the byname to an entirely Gaelic form. [Sorcha inghean uí Mhaoláin, 07/01, A-Calontir]

POLISH

... z domu Piast means "the House of Piast" which was the founding royal dynasty of Poland, ruling from 965-1370. Barring evidence that the general populace used the name, we consider it presumptuous ...[Judwiga Czarna Pika ze Smocza Jamy, 08/99, A-Caid]
As Polonus means 'the Pole' or 'of Poland', this name conflicts with the three kings...: Wladyslaw I (king of Poland from 1306), Wladyslaw II (king from 1386) and Wladyslaw III (king from 1434). [Wladyslaw Polonus, 04/00, R-Æthelmearc]
The name was documented as having a Polish given name with an Italian byname, but no evidence was provided that Poland and Italy were in sufficient cultural contact that the combination is registerable. However, the given name seems not to be limited to Poland: for instance, it was borne by the daughter of Henry the Fat, Duke of Saxony, who later married Lothar II, Holy Roman Emperor. The contact between Germany and Italy was sufficient to allow registration. [Richenza d'Assisi, 07/01, A-Lochac]

PRESUMPTION

Strathardale is a clan seat of the MacKinnons, so the name must be returned as presumptuous. [Duncan MacKinnon of Strathardale, 08/99, R-East]
[Catriona McKenzie of Kintail] As one of the seats of the McKenzies was Kintail, by long standing precedent, using McKenzie of Kintail is presumptuous. [Catriona McKenzie of Kintail, 12/99, R-Atenveldt]
... it was the feelings of the College that Brahman denotes a high enough caste that the use of the name is presumptuous. We would need to see evidence that Brahman implied status no higher than gentry in Europe. [Madhu Brahman, 01/00, R-An Tir]
Submitted as Anna Graham of Montrose. While adding of Montrose clears the earlier conflict with Hannah Graham it adds the new problem that the Graham chiefs are also the Dukes (originally Earls) of Montrose. This means that the submitted name would have been used only by a member of the immediate family of the clan chief and is thus presumptuous. [Anna Graham of Montrose, 04/00, R-Artemisia]
... the Macghie of MacKay implied that the submitter is the clan chief or the clan chief's daughter, which is presumptuous. [Brenna Michaela Sine Macghie of Clan MacKay, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
The question was raised whether the name is presumptuous, since Cäsarea is derived from Caesar , a standard translation for 'Emperor'. However, it is not a title in its own right; furthermore, Zwickau is neither an empire nor a capital city. [Cäsarea von Zwickau, 05/00, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Colin MacKenzie of Eilean Donan, but as Eilean Donan appears to be the clan seat of the MacKenzies the name would have implied membership in the immediate family of the clan chief. Since Colin MacKenzie has already been registered in March 1999, we had to drop the clan name instead of the locative. [Colin of Eilean Donan, 06/00, A-Caid]
Since the Chief of Campbell is also the Duke of Argyll, the submitted name would imply membership in the immediate family of the chief. [Caitriona Campbell of Argyll, 06/00, R-Meridies]
As the name as a whole means 'Lady of Grove', this submission violates section VI.1 of the Rules for Submissions. For the same reason we cannot form a holding name by the standard method of combining her given name with her SCA branch, either. Thus the device must be returned as well. [Dona de Grove, 06/00, R-Meridies]
Submitted as Caecilie the Blessed, she requested an authentic German name. We have therefore changed the byname to a German one with the same meaning. …The question was raised in commentary whether the byname is presumptuous, as Blessed is the level just below Saint in the Catholic process of canonization. However, it has also been used as a byname both in England and in Germany at least since late 13th century. If the general public didn't find a problem with this in period, we are disinclined to see a problem now. [Caecilie Selig, 07/00, R-Meridies]
While the given name would be registerable as her real-world middle name, the name as a whole has serious problems. As early as the excavations by the monks of Glastonbury in 1191, there was an association between Glastonbury Tor and Isle of Avalon or Avallon where Arthur was said to be buried. As this association has continued to the present day, we should be very careful about using the locative Glastonbury in any context where we would not happily use Avalon; after all, the two have been seen as the same place from the twelfth century on. Looking at another twelfth-century work, the Vita Merlini, which was written in verse around 1150 and is generally attributed to Geoffrey of Monmouth (author of the History of the Kings of Britain), we see Morgen as the ruler of the Isle of Apples (i.e., Avalon).

All in all, the name is tantamount to a claim to be Morgan le Fay and therefore falls afoul our rules against presumption. [Morgaine of Glastonbury, 07/00, R-An-Tir]
The byname as submitted has serious problems. Nur appears to be a modern given name (in use, for instance, by the current Queen Mother of Jordan), but we could not find evidence of its use as a period byname. Also, Salahuddin Ahmed's A Dictionary of Muslim Names, notes that al-Noor 'the Light' is one of the names of Allah, so the name appears to be presumptuous as well. [Naadira an-Noor, 07/00, R-Meridies]
[FitzGilbert de Strigoil] This violates RfS VI.3:
Names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character will generally not be registered.
By combining FitzGilbert and de Strigoil, he is claiming to be either the grandson of Gilbert FitzGilbert, first earl of Pembroke, or the brother of Richard FitzGilbert, second earl of Pembroke. Both of these gentlemen have their own entries in the Encyclopaedia Britannica and are therefore important enough to protect; Strigoil was their primary seat. [Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil , 10/00, R-Artemisia]
Submitted as Morwenna ferch y Pennaeth Ceinewydd, the name means Morwenna daughter of the chieftain of Ceinewydd. This, unfortunately, violates Rfs VI.1: Names containing titles, territorial claims, or allusions to rank are considered presumptuous. We have therefore dropped the patronymic. [Morwenna Ceinewydd, 03/01, A-An Tir]
The byname means Wizard and thus violates RfS VI.2: Names containing elements that allude to powers that the submitter does not possess are considered presumptuous. Barring evidence that he is a wizard, or that this byname was used by normal humans in period, we have to return this. [Dirk de Tovenaar. 03/01, R-Atenveldt]
Unfortunately, this name is presumptuous under section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions: "Names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character will generally not be registered." We cannot therefore register it without permission from Eoghan O'Neill, whose name was registered in An Tir in 1992. [Siobhán inghean Eoghain uí Neill, 04/01, R-Ansteorra]
Unfortunately the name Rhianwen ferch Bran ap Gruffydd has already been registered in June 1986. The current submitter is, in effect, claiming to be Rhianwen's father, and the submission is therefore in violation of section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions. [Bran ap Gruffudd, 05/01, R-Ansteorra]
As the submitter states, Chavalerio is an occupational byname meaning Knight. It is, therefore, presumptuous according to section VI.1 of the Rules for Submissions. [Rizardo Chavalerio, 05/01, R-Artemisia]
... the submitted name may be presumptuous. Granted, section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions addresses only names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character. However, it seems appropriate to apply similar standards to personal and non-personal names, and Section VI.4 gives us enough discretion to do so. We would, therefore, return names that unmistakably imply identity with a protected place: for instance, while Londinium does not have its own article in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, London is protected and so registering the Roman name for the city would be presumptuous. In the current case, the modern town does not have its own entry in Britannica and the submission is thus clear on this count as well. [Torna, Canton of, 06/01, A-Drachenwald]
This name ... claims relationship with Griffith ap Morgan ap Griffith, registered in June 1992. [Morgan ap Grufydd, 06/01, R-Ealdormere]
While the given name appears in Ó Corráin and Maguire's Irish Names, they say that The only bearer of this name was Caireen Chasdubh ('of the dark curly hair'), daughter of the king of the Britons, and mother of Niall of the Nine Hostages, legendary ancestress of the high-kings of Ireland. Because of this, the name has already been ruled unregisterable in August 1991. [Cairenn inghean Dubhthaigh, 07/01, R-Calontir]
While the given name appears in Ó Corráin and Maguire's Irish Names, they say it comes from mythology, the wife of the sea-god Manannán mac Lir. Barring evidence that the name was used by humans in period we have to return this. [Fand Mac Cailin, 07/01, R-Calontir]
Unfortunately for the submitter, Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, or El Cid, was essentially the sovereign ruler of Valencia. This name thus implies identity with him and is therefore in violation of section VI.3 of the Rules for Submissions. [Rodrigo de Valencia, 07/01, R-Calontir]

ROMANY

As far as we know, Romany names not used amongst outsiders; however, that is a matter for consideration by the submitter and not a bar to registration. [Kisaiya Zingara, 08/99, A-Atenveldt]

RUSSIAN

... there are no known examples of a patronymic ending in -ovna that do not immediately follow the given name. [Tatiana Gordeevna Kazimirova, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
No evidence was given to show that a locative taken from a river name is a valid byname in either Norse or Russian. [Bjorn of the Kuma, 08/99, R-Caid]
The submitter should be informed that while two given names were used in medieval Russia, one of them was invariably Slavic in origin. In this case both given names are Christian, which is currently a registerable weirdness. [Ekaterina Filippiia, 10/99, A-An Tir]
... there are serious problems with this name. ... There certainly are cases of compound (double-element) given names — where you see an adjective and noun combined together to create a given name — but nothing involving animals. Furthermore, the result is that the two words would be treated as a single element. … we have no cases of adjectival bynames being added to masculine names with feminine endings. … Finally, a reminder that double Russian given names (as the client was trying to construct here) are not grammatically sound in the first place. [See the LoAR for the full discussion.] [Plokhoi Sobaku, 11/00, Ansteorra]
[Zefiryna] The documentation for the given name was not properly summarized in the LoI: it is not sufficient to list the page number and bibliographical information of a source, we need to know what is said. As none of the commenters were able to find documentation that the name is period — and in fact they found indications that it is modern — we are returning the name. [Zefiryna Mikhailovna, 01/01, R-Caid]
While combining Russian with French is registerable, it is a weirdness. The use of double given names in Russian was also ruled a weirdness by Jaelle of Armida in June 1997. The name is, therefore, not registerable as it is. [Jarucha Ekaterina Delamare, 04/01, R-Caid]
Submitted on the LoI as Vladimir Orendorff, we have changed the spelling of the given name back originally submitted form; while that form is less common it is nevertheless registerable. [Vladymyr Orendorff, 06/01, A-Middle]

Scottish see Irish and Scottish


SPANISH and PORTUGUESE

In all known period examples of multiple surnames consisting of a patronymic and a locative, the patronymic invariably appears before the locative. [Juan Lázaro Ramirez Xavier, 10/99, A-East]
Submitted as Rosalinda Francisca Gertrude Kesselheim, the submitter justified the name as a mixture of Spanish and German. In neither language are three given names justified, therefore we dropped the first middle name. This name still has a "weirdness", as Rosalinda has fallen out of use in Germany by the time double given names were in use. [Rosalinda Gertrude Kesselheim, 12/99, A-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Catalina del Sol de Oro, no evidence was given, and none could be found, to show that "of the Golden Sun" is a valid byname in Spanish. The letter of intent suggested that it might be based on an inn name, but we know of no examples of an inn name being used as a byname in Spanish either. Given the dated example Oro Sol in the 13th century, one of the submitter's specifically requested alternates, Catalina Oro Sol, is possible as a name of the form <given name> <given name> <unmarked metronymic>. The submitter also requested an authentic name for 14th-16th century Spain or Portugal. We doubt that the name is authentic as the use of double given names was unheard of until the end of period and we have no citation of Oro or Sol at that time. Catalina Sol would be a reasonably authentic 13th century Spanish name. [Catalina Oro Sol, 03/00, A-Caid]
Submitted as Lupo del Luna, del can only be used with a masculine noun. Furthermore, no documentation was given for the formation of the moon; however, Luna is a period place in Spain, so we dropped the article to make de Luna. [Lupo de Luna, 04/00, A-Middle]
The given name Dulcinea appears first in Miguel Cervantes Saavedra's Don Quijote. Unfortunately, the first volume of the novel was published in 1605. Furthermore, even in the book Dulcinea was not the person's real name but instead a "romance" name given by Don Quijote to his love. [Dulcinea Hurtado de Mendoza, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
[Silvestre Rodriguez de Oliveira] Submitted as Silvestre Rodriguez Gonçalvez de Oliveira, the submitter requested an authentic Portuguese name for about 1200. However, a combination of a given name followed by two patronymics and a locative byname is excessive for Iberia during most of our period, let alone this early. We have therefore dropped the second patronymic. [Cadwan Galwiddoe of Redmarch, 06/00, A-Atlantia]
The submitters have documented that the words used in the name are period. They have provided evidence that the river now known as the Rio de las Animas Perdidas was probably seen by Spanish explorers in the 16th century. They have also documented the use of Las Animas in modern Spanish place names and in the names of Spanish brotherhoods during the period 1558—1832. However, since no dates are given for specific brotherhoods or for the founding of those places, we have no way of knowing whether the brotherhoods and places in question were founded in period.

We still need evidence that rivers were named in this manner in period. In addition, we need evidence that nearby places were named after rivers. Since such evidence was not submitted, we have to return this name again. [Rio de Las Animas Perdidas, Shire of, 01/01, R-Outlands]
Submitted as Moria the Black, the only documentation for the given name was from Tatiana Nikolaevna Tumanova, The Complete Russian Name Book. However, the name could not be found in more recent works on the subject, and Tumanova's book is known to be outdated. Since the submitter is interested in the sound of the name we have changed the given name to a similar-sounding name found in Withycombe's The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. [Maria the Black, 06/01, A-Ealdormere]

SPELLING VARIANTS

[Maximilliam] ... we know of no examples of Maximillian with a double-l. Therefore the given name was changed to a documented German form. [Maximilian Utz von Wulfen, 07/99, A-Atenveldt]
As the submitter requested an authentic German name, the given name was changed in Kingdom to Kassandra. However, considering the variation in period spelling, the originally submitted Cassandra is equally acceptable, so we have changed the name back. The name may not be entirely authentic, though, since we did not find evidence that Cassandra with any spelling was used in Germany. [Cassandra vom Rhein, 06/00, A-Ansteorra]

TIBETAN

Tibetan names were ruled unacceptable by Talan Gwynek in November 1995:
More important, significant interaction between Tibet and pre-seventeenth century Western culture has not been demonstrated. The Encyclopædia Britannica dates the first visits to Tibet by Western missionaries to the 17th century, and the fact that the 8th century Tibetan kingdom had some contact with the Arab conquerors of Iran still leaves Tibetans at least two removes from Western Europe.
Also, the documentation for this name consisted of a letter from a professor of Tibetan studies in Sakya Monastery. However, no background information was given for the academic status of the monastery, and the information on the letter was not supported by, for example, photocopies of a dictionary showing the name elements. Thus we would have had problems with the documentation even if Tibetan names were registerable. [Mu-Man Dkon-Mchog Näm, 04/01, R-An Tir]

TITLES

[Paramount Pursuivant] This title conflicts with Paramount Pictures, which the College of Arms feels is a non-SCA name important enough to protect. Also, we'd like to see more evidence of adjectives used as heraldic titles in period. [Atenveldt, Kingdom of, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
[Order of the Caltrop] The name conflicts with Caltrop Pursuivant, which is registered to the Kingdom of Calontir. Æthelmearc has a letter to conflict from the King and Queen of Calontir. However, current practice allows someone owning Order of the X to use X Pursuivant and vice versa. Therefore two such items are effectively identical. Since we cannot register two identical items even with permission, the order name must be returned. [Æthelmearc, Kingdom of, 10/99, R-Æthelmearc]
[Argent Panthère Herald] While heraldic titles of the type <tincture> <charge> are no longer acceptable where the tincture is specified with the usual terminology of English blazon, titles where the tincture is specified with an everyday word are. Changing panther to the French panthère was a minor change, which the submitters allowed; it also made the title follow such known English examples as Rouge Croix Pursuivant and Rouge Dragon Pursuivant. We were thus able to register this. [Ansteorra, Kingdom of, 06/00, A-Ansteorra]
[Gullinkambi Herald] As noted, Gullinkambi is Old Norse for 'Golden Comb'. While names of deities are not as such appropriate for heraldic titles, names of the type <tincture> <charge> are, when both tincture and charge are specified in everyday language. We also allow heraldic titles in languages where such titles were not used. [Ansteorra, Kingdom of, 06/00, A-Ansteorra]
[Sable Roundel Herald] While heraldic titles of the type <tincture> <charge> are no longer generally acceptable unless the tincture is specified with an everyday word, Ansteorra has already several heralds' titles of the type Sable <charge>. [Ansteorra, Kingdom of, 06/00, A-Ansteorra]
[Argonaut Herald] No evidence was supplied that mythological names as such were used as heralds' titles. [Trimaris, Kingdom of, 06/00, R-Trimaris]
[Vox Mar Herald] Grammatically the title should be Vox Maris. However, the title has style problems as well as grammatical ones. To quote Mistress Jaelle of Armida, Laurel Queen of Arms, quoting Master Da'ud ibn Auda, Laurel King of Arms:
[Artemisia, Kingdom of. Title for Vox Grypis Herald] This is being returned for non period style. In a similar case, Master Da'ud as Laurel said:
[returning Vox Draconis Pursuivant] The previous version, Dragon's Voice Pursuivant, was returned 3/95 for failure to emulate period models as required by RfS III.2.b.iii; translation into Latin doesn't bring it any closer. It was suggested that it might derive from a motto Vox draconis sum 'I am the voice of the dragon', but the period examples noted allcomprise the entire motto, and no evidence was presented that Vox draconis sum is a reasonable imitation of a period motto. (Caid, Kingdom of, 10/95 p. 18)
Barring documentation that this follows period exemplar of heraldic titles, it must be returned. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR, June 1998)
No such documentation was provided this time, either. [Trimaris, Kingdom of, 06/00, R-Trimaris]
[Azure Decrescent Herald] Azure is used as an adjective in period not only for heraldic charges in an English context but also for normal English nouns. [Atlantia, Kingdom of, 07/00, A-Atlantia]
[Merlin Pursuivant] The question was raised in commentary whether this title conflicts with the literary person Merlin. However, personal names and other names are two separate categories. [Calontir, Kingdom of, 08/00, R-Calontir] [Ed.: Returned for lack of paperwork]
[Raptor Pursuivant] ... contrary to what the LoI claims, the name is not "the name of a hunting bird from the hawk, eagle or falcon families, which were common during period". To quote Metron Ariston:
In classical and medieval Latin raptor is the term for a thief or plunderer or even a rapist, essentially anyone who seizes upon something and carries it away. The earlier English usage for this term follows that meaning. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the use of the term for the order of birds of prey would appear to be a nineteenth century usage.
The name does not appear to follow period examples of heralds' titles, any more than the synonymous Rapist Pursuivant would. [Calontir, Kingdom of, 08/00, R-Calontir]
[Ambre Pursuivant] Submitted as Ambres Pursuivant, Crescent indicated he would prefer Ambre. We have recently registered several other precious stones as heraldic titles, so we can change this one to the preferred form. [Caid, Kingdom of, 03/01, A-Caid]

TURKISH

This name has several problems. First, Hurrem/Roxelana, cited in the submission, was known by her original Russian name only to the West; to Turks, she was known by the Turkish harem name. Combining the two names seems to be restricted to modern history books.

Second, an epithet is not acceptable simply because a native speaker says so; modern-day people do not normally have that kind of knowledge about period naming practices. Third, Sarolta is incompatible with the rest of the name: it is only known from 10th century Hungary, and by the time of the Turkish invasion, pagan-era Hungarian female names had already disappeared. [Akilli Asian Sarolta, 07/00, R-Atenveldt]

WEIRDNESS
see also Compatible (Language)
see also Comaptible (SCA)

The submitter should be informed that while two given names were used in medieval Russia, one of them was invariably Slavic in origin. In this case both given names are Christian, which is currently a registerable weirdness. [Ekaterina Filippiia, 10/99, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Ian MacEanruig, that name contains two weirdnesses: it uses a post-period anglicization of a Gaelic name and mixes Gaelic and English orthographies. [Ian MacHenrik, 10/99, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Rosalinda Francisca Gertrude Kesselheim, the submitter justified the name as a mixture of Spanish and German. In neither language are three given names justified, therefore we dropped the first middle name. This name still has a "weirdness", as Rosalinda has fallen out of use in Germany by the time double given names were in use. [Rosalinda Gertrude Kesselheim, 12/99, A-Ansteorra]
Submitted as Duncan Alasdair MacRae, the name had two wierdnesses: mixing the Gaelic and English spellings, and using a double given name in Scots. Therefore, we have Anglicized the entire name. [Duncan Alastair MacRae, 12/99, A-Outlands]
Maura is not justifiable as a period Irish name, as it is a diminutive of Maire, which did not appear in Ireland until the end of our period. There is a possible justification of Maura as a feminization of an 8th c. Frankish male name, but there are other problems. Morlet lists Maura to 739, while MacPharlain is first cited in 1385 (Black, s.n. MacFarlane). Thus the name would have two weirdnesses: the combination of French and Scots Gaelic and temporal incompatibility. [Maura MacPharlain, 02/00, R-Atlantia]
Submitted as Cassandra Annabell O Seanacain, the name has two weirdnesses: the mixture of Gaelic and English spelling conventions and the use of two given names, particularly in an Irish context, where it is not allowed. It also used a masculine form of the patronymic with a feminine name. By Anglicizing the surname, we make this an English name for someone of Irish decent, making it registerable. [Cassandra Annabelle O Shannahan, 04/00, A-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Anu of Shelmerdine, this name has two weirdnesses: it combines English and Irish orthography, and the form Anu was only found before 1300 and Selmerdine is dated to the 16th century, therefore the name is temporally incompatible. We have, therefore, changed the given name to a late period form. [Ana of Shelmerdine, 04/00, A-Middle]
This name has the weirdness of mixing English and Gaelic spelling plus the problem of two given names in Irish. Both problems could be solved by dropping Caitlin, but the submitter allowed no major changes. [Honor Caitlin nic Curtin, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
There are several problems with the name. Brenna is not Gaelic, but is justfiable as possibly Italian. This makes the name acceptable by itself, but not with the rest of the name. The mixture of English and Gaelic spellings in the name is a weirdness. Furthermore, there is no evidence of Scottish or Irish names with two given names, much less three. Also, there is no evidence of the use of Clan <X> in names. Lastly, the Macghie of MacKay implied that the submitter is the clan chief or the clan chief's daughter, which is presumptuous. The submitter should also be informed that Michaela is not Irish. [Brenna Michaela Sine Macghie of Clan MacKay, 04/00, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Gerlinda Uda Agast , the name had two moderately serious problems. First, there was a five-century gap between the documented dates for the given names and the byname; second, we have found no evidence that double given names were used in Dutch-speaking regions in our period. Neither of these problems would in itself be grounds for return, but the combination is unacceptable, as it would take the name two steps away from period practice. We have therefore dropped the second given name. [Gerlinda Agast, 05/00, A-Middle]
Submitted as Úlfarr MacVanis, he requested an authentic Norse/Scots name. The combination of an Old Norse given name and an Anglicized Scots patronymic had too severe a temporal disparity. We have therefore changed the spelling of the given name to medieval Norwegian. [Ulvar MacVanis, 07/00, A-Lochac]
The name has two moderately serious problems. First, the name Iain, while ruled SCA compatible, is not attested in period. Second, the name Menzies is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mèinnearach, so the submitted name as a whole mixes Gaelic and Anglicized orthographies. Neither of these problems would in itself be grounds for a return; however, the combination of the two makes this submission not acceptable. [Iain Bán Menzies, 07/00, R-Atlantia]
While combining Russian with French is registerable, it is a weirdness. The use of double given names in Russian was also ruled a weirdness by Jaelle of Armida in June 1997. The name is, therefore, not registerable as it is. [Jarucha Ekaterina Delamare, 04/01, R-Caid]
Submitted as Faílenn inghean Mheanmain of Ulster, the name had two weirdnesses: combining an Anglicised locative byname with Gaelic elements, and a temporal difference of several centuries between the given name and the patronymic. We have corrected the former by dropping the locative. Note that evidence suggests that Irish locative bynames were normally adjectives — that is, one would be called the Ulsterwoman instead of of Ulster. [Faílenn inghean Mheanmain, 06/01, A-Atlantia]
Submitted on the LoI in this form, Cali seems to be a misreading of 'Ali. Even so, the documentation of this name had several problems, and while none of them would in itself be grounds for return, the combination is not registerable.

Using the kunya of one's father as a part of the name, such as Abi 'Ali here, seems to have been rare enough to be considered a weirdness, at least when followed by father's 'ism, in this case Mahmud.

Mahmud itself is a Turkish form of Muhammad, unattested in an Arabic context. While registerable as a part of an Arabic name it is also a weirdness.

Finally, al-Mufassir is essentially an occupational byname. As such it should normally appear either as the final element or right before the final element. Its position at the beginning of the name is a weirdness as well. [Al-Mufassir Ibrahim ibn Abi Cali Mahmud Al-Fatimi, 06/01, R-Ealdoremere]
The submitter requested an authentic 16th century Gaelic name. We were not able to comply with this request: in fact, the College did not find evidence that the given name was used later than 8th century. While we consider a temporal disparity of eight centuries a weirdness we do not consider it sufficient reason to return the name. [Rónán mac an Stalcair, 07/01, A-Atlantia]
Based on this new evidence we feel that a properly constructed Irish metronymic should be considered a weirdness instead of reason for a return by itself. An unmarked metronymic is still unregisterable. [Caiterína inghean Mháirgrége, 07/01, A-Calontir]

WELSH

Welsh names did not include more than one direct relationship in a name. [Tanglust wraig Brychan, 06/99, A-Atlantia]
[Clan Caer Lonn] The name mixes two languages, Welsh (Caer) and Gaelic (Lonn) in one phrase, violating rule III.1.a, "Linguistic Consistency." Brian should also be informed that Clans were named after personal names and nicknames, not places. Lastly we would prefer to see some evidence that "Strong" is a reasonable adjective to apply to keeps. [Brian Brock, 07/99, R-Atenveldt]
Submitted as Bronwen Gwehyddes y Anglesey, ... Welsh names rarely used locatives in their names, ... we have dropped the preposition as there is no evidence that it would be appropriate in either Welsh or English. [Bronwen Gwehyddes Anglesey, 12/99, A-Atenveldt]
The point was made whether the locative was so closely associated with Owain Glendower that its use should be considered presumptuous. There is, however, no evidence for such a claim; on the contrary, Glendower is an entirely ordinary Welsh place. [Constance Glyn Dwr, 04/00, A-Æthelmearc]
According to Metron Ariston, Aeron appears in some sources as the name of a Welsh battle goddess and it is certainly the name of a river in Wales; however, no one has been able to find it as a given name for a human in period. Furthermore, the construction of Clan X has been disallowed since June 1998. [Aeron Aschennen of Clan MacKenzie, 05/00, R-Ansteorra]
Submitted on the LoI as Gwineth of Iona, the given name was originally submitted as Gwyneth. As Jaelle of Armida, then Laurel, wrote in the November 1997 LoAR,
Morgan & Morgan note the feminine Welsh given name Gwineth in 1577. Therefore, Gwyneth is acceptable as a plausible variant of that name.
We have therefore chagned the name back to the submitted form. [Gwyneth of Iona, 08/00, A-Caid]
Submitted as Morwenna ferch y Pennaeth Ceinewydd, the name means Morwenna daughter of the chieftain of Ceinewydd. This, unfortunately, violates Rfs VI.1: Names containing titles, territorial claims, or allusions to rank are considered presumptuous. We have therefore dropped the patronymic. [Morwenna Ceinewydd, 03/01, A-An Tir]
Submitted as Morwenna teg y Caernarvon, no documentation was provided for the article y (the) in the locative byname. We have dropped it. [Morwenna teg Caernarvon, 07/01, A-Atenveldt]

CONFLICT TABLE

see CONFLICT - Personal Names for complete citations and rulings; not all conflicts are included here

Áengus conflicts with Angus [10/00]
Aindrea conflicts with Andrew [07/01]
Alasdair does not conflict with Alexander [07/00]
Alexander does not conflict with Alasdair [07/00]
Aleyn conflicts with Lynn [05/00]
Alicia conflicts with Alix [07/00]
Alix conflicts with Alicia [07/00]
Andreas conflicts with Andrew [11/00]
Andrew conflicts with Aindrea [07/01]
Andrew conflicts with Andreas [11/00]
Angus conflicts with Áengus [10/00]
Antonella does not conflict with Antonio [01/00]
Antonio does not conflict with Antonella [01/00]
Aubrey does not conflict with Auveré [04/00]
Auveré does not conflict with Aubrey [04/00]
Brian conflicts with Brianna [04/00]
Brian conflicts with Brione [05/00]
Brianna conflicts with Brian [04/00]
Brione conflicts with Brian [05/00]
Cait conflicts with Catairiona [11/99]
Caitlin conflicts with Catharine [01/00]
Caitlin conflicts with Katerine [10/99]
Carolus conflicts with Karius [06/00]
Catairiona conflicts with Cait [11/99]
Catharine conflicts with Caitlin [01/00]
Catriona conflicts with Katherine [05/01]
Coinneach does not conflict with Conal [09/99]
Conal does not conflict with Coinneach [09/99]
Donnchadh conflicts with Duncan [09/00]
Dougal conflicts with Dugald [01/00]
Drago does not conflict with Drake [10/99]
Drake does not conflict with Drago [10/99]
Dugald conflicts with Dougal [01/00]
Duncan conficts with Donnchadh [09/00]
Edwardson conflicts with FitzEdward [03/00]
Eileen conflicts with Ellen [04/00]
Eiríkr conflicts with Eric [10/00]
Elisabeth conflicts with Elisée [05/00]
Elisée conflicts with Elisabeth [05/00]
Ellen conflicts with Eileen [04/00]
Eoin conflicts with Ewan [04/00]
Eoin does not conflict with Ian [11/00]
Eoin conflicts with Ihone [04/01]
Eric conflicts with Eiríkr [10/00]
Ewan conflicts with Eoin [04/00]
FitzEdward conflicts with Edwardson [03/00]
Griffin conflicts with Grufydd [06/01]
Grufydd conflicts with Griffin [06/01]
Hans conflicts with Johann [02/00]
Ian does not conflict with Eoin [11/00]
Ihone conflicts with Eoin [04/01]
ingen conflicts with ni [05/00]
ingen Griogair conflicts with MacGregor [07/01]
inghean conflicts with Nic [02/01]
inghean does not conflict with inghean uí [04/01]
inghean uí does not conflict with inghean [04/01]
inghean uí Dhomnaill does not conflict with MacDonald [04/01]
ingen ui Gobhainn conflicts with MacGowan [06/01]
James conflicts with Jamie [06/00]
Jamie conflicts with James [06/00]
Jan conflicts with John [11/99]
Jane conflicts with Jeanne [09/99]
Jeanne conflicts with Jane [09/99]
Jeanne conflicts with Sean [12/99]
Jehanne conflicts with Johan [06/00]
Johan conflicts with Jehanne [06/00]
Johann conflicts with Hans [02/00]
John conflicts with Jan [11/99]
John Doe conflicts with Seaan Dowe [12/99]
Karius conflicts with Carolus [06/00]
Katerine conflicts with Caitlin [10/99]
Katherine conflicts with Catriona [05/01]
Lynn conflicts with Aleyn [05/00]
Mac ‘son of' does not conflict with O ‘descendant (grandson) of/of clan' [09/99]
MacAngus conflicts with MacAonghais [09/00]
MacAonghais conflicts with MacAngus [09/00]
MacDonald does not conflict with inghean uí Dhomnaill [04/01]
MacDougall conflicts with Ó Dubhghaill [10/00]
MacEogan conflicts with Macewan [11/00]
Macewan conflicts with MacEogan [11/00]
MacGowan conflicts with ingen ui Gobhainn [06/01]
MacGregor conflicts with ingen Griogair [07/01]
MacKenzie conflicts with nicCoinnich [10/99]
Maire conflicts with Mara [10/99]
Mara conflicts with Maire [10/99]
Mary conflicts with Moira [09/99]
Michael conflicts with Mikjal [06/00]
Mikjal conflicts with Michael [06/00]
Moira conflicts with Mary [09/99]
ni conflicts with ingen [05/00]
Nic conflicts with inghean [02/01]
nicCoinnich conflicts with MacKenzie [10/99]
O 'descendant (grandson) of/of clan' does not conflict with Mac 'son of' [09/99]
Ó Dubhghaill conflicts with MacDougall [10/00]
Owain conflicts with Owen [03/00]
Owen conflicts with Owain [03/00]
Seaan Dowe conflicts with John Doe [12/99]
Sean conflicts with Jeanne [12/99]
Seán conflicts with Shauna [09/99]
Shauna conflicts with Seán [09/99]
Sterne conflicts with Sturme [12/99]
Sturme conflicts with Sterne [12/99]
Uilleam conflicts with William [04/00]
William conflicts with Uilleam [04/00]

INDEX

ADMINSTRATIVE
ARABIC
BRANCH see also HOUSEHOLD and ORDERS and AWARDS
BYNAMES
CHINESE
COMPATIBLE (Languages)
COMPATIBLE (SCA)
CONFLICT - Other Names
CONFLICT - Personal Names see also Conflict Table
Conflict Table
DANISH
DEITY
DOCUMENTATION
DUTCH
ENGLISH
FINNISH
FRENCH
GERMAN
GRAMMAR
Gypsy see ROMANY
Heraldic Titles see TITLES
HOUSEHOLD see also BRANCH and ORDERS and AWARDS
HUNGARIAN
Iberian see SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
INDIAN
IRISH and SCOTTISH see also PRESUMPTION
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
LATIN
LEGAL NAME ALLOWANCE
LOCATIVES and PLACE NAMES
Matronymic see PATRONYMIC and MATRONYMIC
MONGOL
Mundane Name Allowance see LEGAL NAME ALLOWANCE
NORSE
ORDERS and AWARDS see also BRANCH and HOUSEHOLD
PATRONYMIC and MATRONYMIC
Place Names see LOCATIVES and PLACE NAMES
POLISH
Portuguese see SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
PRESUMPTION
ROMANY
RUSSIAN
Scottish see IRISH and SCOTTISH
SPANISH and PORTUGUESE
SPELLING VARIANTS
TITLES
TURKISH
WEIRDNESS see also COMPATIBLE (Language) and COMPATIBLE (SCA)
WELSH






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